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Should I do a psychology degree?

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    I'm about to go into A2 with Human Biology, Chemistry and Psychology and I have just completed an AS in Physics. This year I've realised how much I hate science and much prefer the writing and analytical side of Psychology . I remember liking this too when I studied English Literature at GCSE. For this reason, I'm considering doing a Psychology degree because it seems like my only, and safest, option. I know that I definitely don't want to go into anything science related.

    I enjoy psychology and the only thing putting me off is the fact that it's not as respected as a chemistry degree which was my original plan.

    As far as future jobs go I have no idea. The only thing that's stood out to me and interested me is being a clinical psychologist. The other problem with that is I feel like it'd be quite a lonely job? I'd love to work in an office environment with lots of people around me whilst incorporating an aspect of psychology, although I doubt that job exists lol.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by LeaX)
    I enjoy psychology and the only thing putting me off is the fact that it's not as respected as a chemistry degree which was my original plan.
    I don't understand what you mean by that


    Psychology is considered a science, so if you do psychology most people would be starting to call that science related, which you say you don't want. I'm not actually sure how a BA in psychology would be different because all the courses I've looked at are exactly the same for the BSc and the BA.

    I think you can go into human resources type positions with a psychology degree, so maybe that could fill your office environment w/ psychology idea?
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    (Original post by Carrby)
    I don't understand what you mean by that


    Psychology is considered a science, so if you do psychology most people would be starting to call that science related, which you say you don't want. I'm not actually sure how a BA in psychology would be different because all the courses I've looked at are exactly the same for the BSc and the BA.

    I think you can go into human resources type positions with a psychology degree, so maybe that could fill your office environment w/ psychology idea?
    I know it's technically a science but compared to the three core sciences it's to much lesser extent (thank god lol).

    Ooh thanks, I'll look into that job.
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    (Original post by LeaX)
    I know it's technically a science but compared to the three core sciences it's to much lesser extent (thank god lol).

    Ooh thanks, I'll look into that job.
    It is a science

    Most people who do a psychology degree do not go into psychology related careers ... check out stats at many universities for career prospects
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    When you hit undergrad you'll be surprised at the amount of science involved in Psychology. At A-level the science parts are nothing compared to those in the hard sciences, but come university you will have to learn complex neuroanatomy and the biological and chemical basis of vision, hearing etc. And a lot of stats. Just fair warning. People struggle.

    Also further to what Carrby said about a BA - don't do it. You will not be able to go into clinical without a conversion course. Make sure your degree is accredited by the BPS.
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    Definitely study something you'll enjoy. You don't want to be stuck doing a degree you hate coz it would probably drag your marks down.

    Psychology is a great subject to study, but I have to admit I lost interest in my degree for the last 2 years lol.
    If you prefer writing essays then you should do well on a BSc Psychology course.

    I have to warn you, Clinical Psychology is extremely competitive. If you really want to go into this area I'd suggest you to get some work experience during your A2 year or during your degree, such as volunteering on hospital wards or befriending schemes. This will be a good starting point.

    If you want to work in an environment where you can interact with your colleagues then possibly recruitment/human resources is a good area to go into. I've applied for some recruitment consultant positions since I've graduated, but unfortunately not had much luck.
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    (Original post by alexmagpie)
    When you hit undergrad you'll be surprised at the amount of science involved in Psychology. At A-level the science parts are nothing compared to those in the hard sciences, but come university you will have to learn complex neuroanatomy and the biological and chemical basis of vision, hearing etc. And a lot of stats. Just fair warning. People struggle.

    Also further to what Carrby said about a BA - don't do it. You will not be able to go into clinical without a conversion course. Make sure your degree is accredited by the BPS.
    Oh okay looks like it need to do lots of research. I don't even know the difference between a BA and a BSc.
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    (Original post by LeaX)
    Oh okay looks like it need to do lots of research. I don't even know the difference between a BA and a BSc.
    BA - Bachelor of Arts
    BSc - Bachelor of Sciences

    Don't get me wrong - BAs aren't bad. They're just not good for science subjects, understandably. The BPS (our professional body) only accredits BScs (and only certain ones at that), and you can only progress onto postgrad to qualify as a psychologist with an accredited Psychology BSc.

    Let me know if you have any questions - I've just finished first year
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    (Original post by LeaX)

    As far as future jobs go I have no idea. The only thing that's stood out to me and interested me is being a clinical psychologist. The other problem with that is I feel like it'd be quite a lonely job? I'd love to work in an office environment with lots of people around me whilst incorporating an aspect of psychology, although I doubt that job exists lol.

    Thank you.
    So I'm going to go against general opinion on this thread. If you're not sure what to do regarding jobs, don't do a psychology degree. That's notoriously what psych students do. 16,000 people get offers to do it each year and it's popularity is only second to law-there is an oversaturated pool of psych graduates. That's a lot of graduates. If you've completed it and you go to a general non psych specific employer, your degree won't wow them as so many others have it. And would they choose you over a person with a degree in the other sciences solely based on the degree? Honestly I don't think so. I love psych, and I think the degree is a good one but it just isn't that well respected.

    The road to becoming a clinical psych is tough, many want to do postgrad so it is difficult to get there. Pop psychology has made forensic/clinical psychologist dream jobs for so, so, so many applicants.

    Maybe research chemistry and psychology more and see what you think. Look at the possible careers, talk to graduates/chemists/psychologists, check out unistats (it's a must) and use the UCAS data sets.

    Psychology was always perfect to me from what the unis, brochures and teachers said-a good mix of essay writing, discussion and science and stats mixed with human life and culture, which was all bloody interesting, but remember, university is an investment you're paying 9k a year for this degree. Is it really worth it when so, so many others have it?

    In answer to the title...for me personally, no.
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    (Original post by LeaX)
    Oh okay looks like it need to do lots of research. I don't even know the difference between a BA and a BSc.
    BA and BSc allows you to take different career paths. The courses are exactly the same. People who graduate as a BA tend to go into counselling whilst those who do a BSc tend to work in a more clinical environment, i.e hospitals and research.

    Psychology is incredibly science based. It's completely different to A Level. If you want to be a clinical psychologist, it can involves a lot of chemistry and biology, for example neurotransmitters. So if you don't like those two subjects, perhaps it's not for you? If you're interesting in an analytical side, try counselling.

    Work experience for clinical psychology is scarce at a young age since you're obviously working with very vulnerable people. When you get to an undergraduate level, you can ask your university to help you find work experience as they tend to have connections with hospitals. For now, I recommend doing something like peer mentoring if it's offered at your school? Shows you're a good listener and eager to help others which is important to a clinical psychology/counselling degree.
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    (Original post by alexmagpie)
    BA - Bachelor of Arts
    BSc - Bachelor of Sciences

    Don't get me wrong - BAs aren't bad. They're just not good for science subjects, understandably. The BPS (our professional body) only accredits BScs (and only certain ones at that), and you can only progress onto postgrad to qualify as a psychologist with an accredited Psychology BSc.

    Let me know if you have any questions - I've just finished first year

    For clarity, must point out that the BPS accredits both BA and BSc psychology degrees - in psychology they often offer the same content and differ only in the award at the end.
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    (Original post by Anotherdegree)
    For clarity, must point out that the BPS accredits both BA and BSc psychology degrees - in psychology they often offer the same content and differ only in the award at the end.
    My apologies OP, I was misinformed. Ignore my advice!

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