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Getting an A* in a mother-tongue language?

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    So if I get an A* in my mother-tongue language (the language that is spoken at home between family members, which doesn't require any revision/lessons) would that count? or would it be as a cheat-GCSE?

    I'm considering doing Arabic GCSE but I know everything and it feels as if I'm cheating my way into an A*, I don't know whether I should do it or not.
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    You may as well, it's always useful.
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    I don't see any problem with that? I were you, I'd certainly do so; I know a friend fluent in Dutch (as his mum is from Holland) who took a Dutch GCSE in Year 9 and got an A* - easy, no problems, nobody cared or considered it "cheating" (in fact the school encourages people like you to do so). Without a doubt it would make you stand out ahead of the increasing no. of people who don't have/aren't taking a GCSE in a foreign language. It's an intrinsic asset you have, don't waste it
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    I'd go for it- it isn't going to take much effort to get a good grade so you might as well. A lot of kids in my secondary school used to take their mother-language GCSE in year 9 to have it done by the time they were actually doing their GCSE and I know a couple of them did no revision just because they were fluent so there wasn't any point.

    In terms of what it will count towards it differs- I know some colleges/ Unis don't accept qualifications if it's a person's mother-tongue as they are looking for an ability to learn rather than actually knowing the language. But it is always something useful to have when your applying to jobs- sort of a proof that you can speak a different language. It's not a cheat GCSE- a GCSE is a GCSE noone can take that away from you, some people may not care for it because it doesn't require much effort but I can't really see a situation where it would be a hnderance.
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    Do it. My friend did German A-Level when she was really young (she's Austrian). Didn't help with her uni application, but why not, if you have the time?!
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    (Original post by `God)
    So if I get an A* in my mother-tongue language (the language that is spoken at home between family members, which doesn't require any revision/lessons) would that count? or would it be as a cheat-GCSE?

    I'm considering doing Arabic GCSE but I know everything and it feels as if I'm cheating my way into an A*, I don't know whether I should do it or not.
    I did it, and I did the A level as well.

    Free UCAS points, I couldn't resist.

    Haters gonna hate.

    But then I realised it doesn't mean anything since 90% of unis ask for grades, not points. :facepalm:
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    Surely it's only the same as English people getting A* in English GCSE or Welsh people getting A* in GCSE First-Language Welsh? Only difference is that those are compulsory whereas you can choose these other ones. I say go for it, an extra A* is an extra A*. No-one's going to sit you down in a job interview and explain that you're perfect for the job in all aspects other than the fact that they consider your A* in your mother-tongue a "cheat" GCSE.

    Jeez, people need to read the thread before negging... I already explained I was mistaken :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by tamimi)
    I did it, and I did the A level as well.

    Free UCAS points, I couldn't resist.

    Haters gonna hate.

    But then I realised it doesn't mean anything since 90% of unis ask for grades, not points. :facepalm:
    That's a good point, free ucas points up for grabs to be honest, but then again, ucas points only apply to the 'not so regarded degrees'.
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    (Original post by Coconutter)
    I'd go for it- it isn't going to take much effort to get a good grade so you might as well. A lot of kids in my secondary school used to take their mother-language GCSE in year 9 to have it done by the time they were actually doing their GCSE and I know a couple of them did no revision just because they were fluent so there wasn't any point.

    In terms of what it will count towards it differs- I know some colleges/ Unis don't accept qualifications if it's a person's mother-tongue as they are looking for an ability to learn rather than actually knowing the language. But it is always something useful to have when your applying to jobs- sort of a proof that you can speak a different language. It's not a cheat GCSE- a GCSE is a GCSE noone can take that away from you, some people may not care for it because it doesn't require much effort but I can't really see a situation where it would be a hnderance.
    How are universities going to know?and OP should take it for A-Level as well-easy A*.
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    Go for it, I did, although I only mustered an A, I didn't revise my writing scripts so didn't do as good as them. So moral, just because its your mother tongue, still learn your scripts.

    It's not a cheat, its like an athletic person doing PE, or a person who's really into politics doing politics.
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    (Original post by James A)
    That's a good point, free ucas points up for grabs to be honest, but then again, ucas points only apply to the 'not so regarded degrees'.
    That's right. I applied so that my first choice was "decent" and my insurance was Ucas dependant.

    Good strategy when you know you've got the points but not sure about the grades.
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    most unis don't take it into account because like you said, its basically cheating the system
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    (Original post by rmpr97)
    Go for it, I did, although I only mustered an A, I didn't revise my writing scripts so didn't do as good as them. So moral, just because its your mother tongue, still learn your scripts.

    It's not a cheat, its like an athletic person doing PE, or a person who's really into politics doing politics.
    If it was writing,you should have got 60 minutes,which should be enough to create a full UMS GCSE piece from scratch,if it was your mother tongue I would have imagined and I forgot my writing scripts for German and created it all from scratch and it ended up being my highest mark,an high A* and no,German isn't my mother tongue language I only speak English so i'm a little:confused:
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    How are universities going to know?and OP should take it for A-Level as well-easy A*.
    I like how out of my whole post you take that one little bit XD. I said they should do it because there is no reason not to- just I personally know someone that was told by a Uni admissions office that they wouldn't accept her German GCSE because they were looking for ability to learn not how well they know the language.
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    GCSEs aren't worth anything in UCAS points. I think the only Level 2 qualification that is worth anything in UCAS points are Key Skills and even then it's only 10.

    http://www.ucas.ac.uk/students/ucas_.../tarifftables/

    My ex had an A* in GCSE Persian. He'd tell people he had one A* (amongst many lesser grades, unfortunately for him) but as soon as he told people what it was in there was less interest because, "oh... you didn't really have to put in effort then, did you?". On the other hand I don't see why not. It's always a back up if you don't do so well in another GCSE and you need x amount to get into a college course/sixth form. Besides, SOME universities do look at GCSEs so it would help in that instance too.
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    (Original post by Coconutter)
    I like how out of my whole post you take that one little bit XD. I said they should do it because there is no reason not to- just I personally know someone that was told by a Uni admissions office that they wouldn't accept her German GCSE because they were looking for ability to learn not how well they know the language.
    How did they find out-there must have been some espionage:confused:
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    You might as well! I did my GCSE in my bi-lingual language and got an A* ( I consider English to be my mother tongue now )
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    How did they find out-there must have been some espionage:confused:
    No she called in about it (very long story), regarless she wanted to add a bit in her personal statement about her close links with her German heritage so it would have been a give away either way.
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    (Original post by Coconutter)
    No she called in about it (very long story), regarless she wanted to add a bit in her personal statement about her close links with her German heritage so it would have been a give away either way.
    That wasn't too clever.
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    (Original post by madders94)
    Surely it's only the same as English people getting A* in English GCSE or Welsh people getting A* in GCSE First-Language Welsh? Only difference is that those are compulsory whereas you can choose these other ones. I say go for it, an extra A* is an extra A*. No-one's going to sit you down in a job interview and explain that you're perfect for the job in all aspects other than the fact that they consider your A* in your mother-tongue a "cheat" GCSE.
    Not sure about Welsh but getting an A* in English in England is nothing compared to A* in other languages which at GCSE is elementary level AS the work really loads up.

    Basically it is much difficult to get good grade in English GCSE requires more work than in a GCSE language.

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