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Neuroimaging Career

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    Hey (not sure if this is the right place to ask this) but im currently studying English Literature & Psychology at uni and am definitely swaying more towards a career in psychology when i graduate in a year's time, in particular neuroimaging. I find the more science-based lectures far more interesting than the wishy-washy theory side of psychology and I was just wondering if anyone could tell me the route to take in order to be able to work in neuroimaging / neuroscience. I plan on applying for some relevant work experience in my final year (even if it's just a couple of hours each week) and my dissertation will involve a study using the EEG equipment there is on campus but basically, is a masters / Phd essential or would it be possible to start as an assistant and then work my way up or something? Perhaps even a graduate scheme if this sort of thing exists - i don't really know what my options are. Funding would be a major issue, that's all
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    (Original post by AdventureIndigo)
    Hey (not sure if this is the right place to ask this) but im currently studying English Literature & Psychology at uni and am definitely swaying more towards a career in psychology when i graduate in a year's time, in particular neuroimaging. I find the more science-based lectures far more interesting than the wishy-washy theory side of psychology and I was just wondering if anyone could tell me the route to take in order to be able to work in neuroimaging / neuroscience. I plan on applying for some relevant work experience in my final year (even if it's just a couple of hours each week) and my dissertation will involve a study using the EEG equipment there is on campus but basically, is a masters / Phd essential or would it be possible to start as an assistant and then work my way up or something? Perhaps even a graduate scheme if this sort of thing exists - i don't really know what my options are. Funding would be a major issue, that's all
    There are master degrees out there in Neuroimaging and Neuroscience, and you Psychology background with a good result should get you a place on a course. Have a look on findamasters.com/ and/or mastersportal.eu/ (great if you're interested in going abroad), and if you're interested in studying in a variety of locations see the Erasmus Mundus.

    Hope this helps. I have a degree in Eng Lit and took a few Psychology modules, and I'm looking to enter the world of Neuroscience now, too. I've been doing lots of research on it, so if you have any questions, feel free to ask. There are a variety of subdivision in neuroscience as well, and if you are interested in going abroad, the Netherlands have very strong programs as well and are much cheaper than the UK.
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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    There are master degrees out there in Neuroimaging and Neuroscience, and you Psychology background with a good result should get you a place on a course. Have a look on findamasters.com/ and/or mastersportal.eu/ (great if you're interested in going abroad), and if you're interested in studying in a variety of locations see the Erasmus Mundus.

    Hope this helps. I have a degree in Eng Lit and took a few Psychology modules, and I'm looking to enter the world of Neuroscience now, too. I've been doing lots of research on it, so if you have any questions, feel free to ask. There are a variety of subdivision in neuroscience as well, and if you are interested in going abroad, the Netherlands have very strong programs as well and are much cheaper than the UK.
    Which universities are in the netherlands which are good for neuroscience?
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    Which universities are in the netherlands which are good for neuroscience?
    Just note that their MSc programmes (research) are usually 2 years. The unis will depend on the area of neuroscience you're interested in.

    Cognitive
    A top program in cognitive neuroscience is offered by Radboud University Nijmegen. They're a world leading institution in cognitive neuroscience research.

    Utretch also offer an MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience, but I don't know as much about it.

    University of Amsterdam offer and MSc Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

    Bio
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is part of the Neurasmus masters, but you can study the entire masters there as well.

    There is a lot of quality research coming out of the Netherlands, especially in Cognitive Neuroscience. Many graduates of these courses from the universities above tend to go on PhDs at some of the top unis in the world.


    (This all comes from research I did last year as I've been considering moving into neuroscience. I'd post links if I still had them, but you can feel free to check out the unis listed for yourself. They tend to give lots of information. I've been on various forums as well, and I have met some cognitive neuroscience students through them who completed their MSc at Nijmegen and then got on to a PhD at Oxford and UCL, and I know some who've done the reverse.)

    Hope this helps. I'm not trying to sell this to anyone, just trying to provide info that might offer other options for those looking for them, for whatever reason.
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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    Just note that their MSc programmes (research) are usually 2 years. The unis will depend on the area of neuroscience you're interested in.

    Cognitive
    A top program in cognitive neuroscience is offered by Radboud University Nijmegen. They're a world leading institution in cognitive neuroscience research.

    Utretch also offer an MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience, but I don't know as much about it.

    University of Amsterdam offer and MSc Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

    Bio
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is part of the Neurasmus masters, but you can study the entire masters there as well.

    There is a lot of quality research coming out of the Netherlands, especially in Cognitive Neuroscience. Many graduates of these courses from the universities above tend to go on PhDs at some of the top unis in the world.


    (This all comes from research I did last year as I've been considering moving into neuroscience. I'd post links if I still had them, but you can feel free to check out the unis listed for yourself. They tend to give lots of information. I've been on various forums as well, and I have met some cognitive neuroscience students through them who completed their MSc at Nijmegen and then got on to a PhD at Oxford and UCL, and I know some who've done the reverse.)

    Hope this helps. I'm not trying to sell this to anyone, just trying to provide info that might offer other options for those looking for them, for whatever reason.
    OMG cheers. I don't understand why we pay little in amsterdam yet we wouldn't return the favour to EU students who will pay £9000 (or more possibly, don't really know). Will i need a first to get into Nijegen ? Im doing a mixed honours (Politics, Psychology & sociology) course too, although I've specialised in just psychology from second year on.

    Also do most of the unis do courses in english?
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    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    OMG cheers. I don't understand why we pay little in amsterdam yet we wouldn't return the favour to EU students who will pay £9000 (or more possibly, don't really know). Will i need a first to get into Nijegen ? Im doing a mixed honours (Politics, Psychology & sociology) course too, although I've specialised in just psychology from second year on.

    Also do most of the unis do courses in english?
    I would say a 2.1 should be enough to get in, but you're best off contacting the uni. I've always received very friendly and fairly prompt replies when asking questions about entry requirements. Nijmegen Cognitive Neuroscience info. Check their website. It's quite informative. You can even check the admission requirements, which tells you the type of knowledge you need for each track based on your bachelor degree.

    Many postgrad courses are taught in English, even some courses station Dutch/English, with it defaulting to English if there are any non-Dutch speakers on the course.

    Also, Phds over there are treated like jobs, you are paid for four years, and your pay increases each year. Much better funding. Also, even though the masters is 2 years, fees are €1,771 for the year for 2012-2013. Cost of living is cheaper, at least cheaper than London.

    Hope this is helpful. I wish I were in a situation right now where I could make the move and start this masters.

    As for the fee difference, well you are treated like a home student. This is why I know many EU nationals who have opted to complete a degree in their home country and then do an Erasmus, where you pay fees to your home country.
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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    I would say a 2.1 should be enough to get in, but you're best off contacting the uni. I've always received very friendly and fairly prompt replies when asking questions about entry requirements. Nijmegen Cognitive Neuroscience info. Check their website. It's quite informative. You can even check the admission requirements, which tells you the type of knowledge you need for each track based on your bachelor degree.

    Many postgrad courses are taught in English, even some courses station Dutch/English, with it defaulting to English if there are any non-Dutch speakers on the course.

    Also, Phds over there are treated like jobs, you are paid for four years, and your pay increases each year. Much better funding. Also, even though the masters is 2 years, fees are €1,771 for the year for 2012-2013. Cost of living is cheaper, at least cheaper than London.

    Hope this is helpful. I wish I were in a situation right now where I could make the move and start this masters.

    As for the fee difference, well you are treated like a home student. This is why I know many EU nationals who have opted to complete a degree in their home country and then do an Erasmus, where you pay fees to your home country.
    Cool thanks for this. I guess i can't really make a decision until i know what part of psychology i'd like to do research in (if at all, although it looks that way). Netherlands and other EU places seem to be worth a look in!
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    (Original post by k1tsun3)
    Just note that their MSc programmes (research) are usually 2 years. The unis will depend on the area of neuroscience you're interested in.

    Cognitive
    A top program in cognitive neuroscience is offered by Radboud University Nijmegen. They're a world leading institution in cognitive neuroscience research.

    Utretch also offer an MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience, but I don't know as much about it.

    University of Amsterdam offer and MSc Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

    Bio
    Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is part of the Neurasmus masters, but you can study the entire masters there as well.

    There is a lot of quality research coming out of the Netherlands, especially in Cognitive Neuroscience. Many graduates of these courses from the universities above tend to go on PhDs at some of the top unis in the world.


    (This all comes from research I did last year as I've been considering moving into neuroscience. I'd post links if I still had them, but you can feel free to check out the unis listed for yourself. They tend to give lots of information. I've been on various forums as well, and I have met some cognitive neuroscience students through them who completed their MSc at Nijmegen and then got on to a PhD at Oxford and UCL, and I know some who've done the reverse.)

    Hope this helps. I'm not trying to sell this to anyone, just trying to provide info that might offer other options for those looking for them, for whatever reason.

    Hello,

    I stumbled upon this thread and if would be very helpful if you all could guide me here.I have received Neurasmus ( Erasmus Mundus funded Neuroscience program). My first year is at University of Berlin and second year at University of Amsterdam. I also have a offer to study MSc in Integrated Immunology at Oxford University.

    I am a bit dubious about the program at Oxford since its a taught program and whether it would fetch me a funded PhD in the top universities. Could you please tell me how good is this 2year Neurasmus program(its pros and cons). What would I be able to do after getting this degree?Would I be able to get into the top universities in world(Oxford,Cambridge,Yale,Prin ceton etc) and obtain funded PhD after completion of this course?

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