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Muslims, could you ever bring yourself not to fast?

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    Well to answer the OP I know many Muslims who fast like you are meant to, and many who go along with it because they have to, and some more who just pretend to do it.

    And I wouldn't say it's unhealthy unless you are gorging yourself on unhealthy stuff at iftari.
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    There's a Muslim girl at my work who is not fasting. This is because she has an infection.
    It's a hot place to work, so a different Muslim girl broke her fast temporarily to have some water to prevent a headache.

    There are lots of issues in Islam in foreign countries. How they fast isn't an issue - according to my colleagues (most of whom are Muslim), fasting may be broken in case of illness or such. It isn't supposed to make you sick, it's supposed to show self-control. Apparently, if you can control the desire for food/drink, you can control the desire for anything.
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    (Original post by lightburns)
    There's a Muslim girl at my work who is not fasting. This is because she has an infection.
    It's a hot place to work, so a different Muslim girl broke her fast temporarily to have some water to prevent a headache.

    There are lots of issues in Islam in foreign countries. How they fast isn't an issue - according to my colleagues (most of whom are Muslim), fasting may be broken in case of illness or such. It isn't supposed to make you sick, it's supposed to show self-control. Apparently, if you can control the desire for food/drink, you can control the desire for anything.
    True


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    (Original post by jmlkey)
    I know i said i wouldn't, but...

    I meant i couldn't find a study relevant to our discussion.
    I wasn't aware glycogen couldn't be stored at night, sources?
    The way you keep "quoting" things i haven't said is starting to get annoying. All i actually said was that ramadan done properly is not unhealthy, and is useful for teaching yourself things, like empathy with the poor and self control. I never said or implied it was anything beyond that.
    Seriously, when you demonstrate you dont even have a basic understanding of ketogenesis why would you even be trying to give advice on the health aspects of fasting and eating before sleep?
    glyocgen is stored in the liver during sleep - to a point, when there is excess the overflow is converted to fat which the body assimlates while you sleep, sleep is the time most weight gain actually occurs.
    therefore boosting sugar levels, and fast acting carb intake prior to sleep by an action such as gorging on food at bedtime after a day fast, like muslims do, is a trigger for unhealthy blood sugar levels and weight gain. I cant dumb that down for you anymore than that. If you still dont understand these basic concepts , suggest you do a little reading before returning to this thread.
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    From my understanding, unless you have some type of food related disorder or illness, then Muslims cannot exempt themselves and therefore it will be a sin (in their eyes) to break the fast. For example, if I were Muslim (I'm a liberal protestant btw), I would be exempt on grounds of being diabetic.

    Other than islam, is fasting a part of other religions? I'm just curious to know
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    (Original post by gagaslilmonsteruk)
    From my understanding, unless you have some type of food related disorder or illness, then Muslims cannot exempt themselves and therefore it will be a sin (in their eyes) to break the fast. For example, if I were Muslim (I'm a liberal protestant btw), I would be exempt on grounds of being diabetic.

    Other than islam, is fasting a part of other religions? I'm just curious to know
    Most religions have fasting rituals or histories of, including christianity and judaism, probably originating from the same pre-abrhamic ancient rituals that islam copied too.
    but modern day i dont think anyone fasts ritually for a whole month, or at least does it as allowed in islam ie dont eat during the day but jsut eat at night time instead.
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    Seriously, when you demonstrate you dont even have a basic understanding of ketogenesis why would you even be trying to give advice on the health aspects of fasting and eating before sleep?
    glyocgen is stored in the liver during sleep - to a point, when there is excess the overflow is converted to fat which the body assimlates while you sleep, sleep is the time most weight gain actually occurs.
    therefore boosting sugar levels, and fast acting carb intake prior to sleep by an action such as gorging on food at bedtime after a day fast, like muslims do, is a trigger for unhealthy blood sugar levels and weight gain. I cant dumb that down for you anymore than that. If you still dont understand these basic concepts , suggest you do a little reading before returning to this thread.
    If you manage to entirely saturate glycogen stores whilst eating at a caloric deficit, the resulting fat will then be used, because of the deficit.
    If you're eating at a surplus, well, we know you'll gain fat anyway.

    My point was whether calories are coming from carbs, or the carbs are coming at night, is all irrelevant in terms of fat gain.
    Also, i'm not sure that saturation is likely to occur after having fasted for a whole day. You'd be running pretty low on glycogen.

    This has been my fault, I've just not explained what i meant very well. Apologies
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    Most religions have fasting rituals or histories of, including christianity and judaism, probably originating from the same pre-abrhamic ancient rituals that islam copied too.
    but modern day i dont think anyone fasts ritually for a whole month, or at least does it as allowed in islam ie dont eat during the day but jsut eat at night time instead.
    You obviously don't know any Muslims. A majority of Muslims do fast 'properly' in the 'modern day' and don't eat (or drink) during the day and just eat at night - I've been doing it since I was 7 years old (not out of force mind, but because I wanted to). Unless you're saying no one doesn't eat anything for an entire month?! Of course no body would do that as it would lead to death (at very serious anorexia).

    To answer OP, Islam should technically not have any force behind it, of course families tend to pressurize their kids (luckily mine don't) but ultimately, its a do it if you want to sort of thing. You know its good that you do it but it's your choice in the end. I have taken days off due to illness but I always redo them before next fast - it's the same for most muslims.

    But if you're gonna do it and be angry or take it out on others than don't do it at all - at least that's how Islam sees it.

    All in all though, you get use to it very quickly. I've been doing it since I was young, so I don't feel anything from it anymore. It's all about will power, I've always been strong willed so fasting really doesn't affect me at all.
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    Most religions have fasting rituals or histories of, including christianity and judaism, probably originating from the same pre-abrhamic ancient rituals that islam copied too.
    but modern day i dont think anyone fasts ritually for a whole month, or at least does it as allowed in islam ie dont eat during the day but jsut eat at night time instead.
    You obviously don't know any Muslims. A majority of Muslims do fast 'properly' in the 'modern day' and don't eat (or drink) during the day and just eat at night - I've been doing it since I was 7 years old (not out of force mind, but because I wanted to). Unless you're saying no one doesn't eat anything for an entire month?! Of course no body would do that as it would lead to death (or very serious anorexia).

    To answer OP, Islam should technically not have any force behind it, of course families tend to pressurize their kids (luckily mine don't) but ultimately, its a do it if you want to sort of thing. You know its good that you do it but it's your choice in the end. I have taken days off due to illness but I always redo them before next fast - it's the same for most muslims.

    But if you're gonna do it and be angry or take it out on others than don't do it at all - at least that's how Islam sees it.

    All in all though, you get use to it very quickly. I've been doing it since I was young, so I don't feel anything from it anymore. It's all about will power, I've always been strong willed so fasting really doesn't affect me at all.
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    (Original post by Politricks)
    The reason some Muslims fast is simply because they feel pressured to do so; they see their friends and family doing it, and they'd feel very awkward if they're the odd one out, and not to mention the shame...Ramadan is the period where Muslims put up a 'Holier-than-thou' attitude for a month.

    Edit: Some Many Muslims*. Most Muslims I know rarely pray or read from the Qur'an, because most of the time they won't get shamed for not doing so, however, come Ramadan, they do get shamed by their peers and family for not fasting, so they fast so they don't get looked down on by their holier-than-thou friends, I doubt some of them fast because they sincerely want to, they probably scoff on goodies when nobody's looking.
    I'm a Muslim and I know many Muslims, and I deffos agree with this.
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    (Original post by Politricks)
    The reason some Muslims fast is simply because they feel pressured to do so; they see their friends and family doing it, and they'd feel very awkward if they're the odd one out, and not to mention the shame...Ramadan is the period where Muslims put up a 'Holier-than-thou' attitude for a month.


    Edit: Some Many Muslims*. Most Muslims I know rarely pray or read from the Qur'an, because most of the time they won't get shamed for not doing so, however, come Ramadan, they do get shamed by their peers and family for not fasting, so they fast so they don't get looked down on by their holier-than-thou friends, I doubt some of them fast because they sincerely want to, they probably scoff on goodies when nobody's looking.
    I agree with this largely, for many there is a large part of pressure, but there is no need to put it so negatively.

    Fasting - at least in my home, is also a time that the family is all the together and breaking our fast together is a great event and a fun time. Akin to a Christmas dinner but everyday! Everyone is there, enjoying and knowing that we've all gone through that day of fast together. Brings the family together.

    So yes, there are some negative elements (mainly due to family cultures) but let's not shut out the positives.
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    If I'm ill I miss days, but make up for them at another time. If I "can't be bothered" to fast, I'd still do it. It's really not that hard. I don't get pressured by my family to fast and I have started fasting properly at the age of 12.

    It DOES have benefits if done correctly, and by "correctly" I mean not eating like a pig and stocking up on the 2000+ calories you've missed out on, as that is clearly unhealthy and defeats the point of Ramadan, which is self control and seeing how people in poverty feel on a daily basis.
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    (Original post by Oiseaux)
    If I'm ill I miss days, but make up for them at another time. If I "can't be bothered" to fast, I'd still do it. It's really not that hard. I don't get pressured by my family to fast and I have started fasting properly at the age of 12.

    It DOES have benefits if done correctly, and by "correctly" I mean not eating like a pig and stocking up on the 2000+ calories you've missed out on, as that is clearly unhealthy and defeats the point of Ramadan, which is self control and seeing how people in poverty feel on a daily basis.
    Exactly, you pretty much sum it up.

    There is actually going to be a BBC program I think (sometimes soon anyway) about the health benefits of fasting (ancient and modern). One I can think of is it helps control out of the control eating habits, mainly overeating. Not to say it stops it 100% or turns obese people healthy but it does discourage, especially for younglings.

    But for me, it's ultimately a test of will and one I gladly preserve through every time.
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    (Original post by Tom_Hagen)
    Nobody actually knows if you're fasting or not though, surely? If you don't want them to know, I'm guessing it's fairly easy to slip away for a quick bite?

    (Original post by Politricks)
    The reason some Muslims fast is simply because they feel pressured to do so; they see their friends and family doing it, and they'd feel very awkward if they're the odd one out, and not to mention the shame...Ramadan is the period where Muslims put up a 'Holier-than-thou' attitude for a month.

    Edit: Some Many Muslims*. Most Muslims I know rarely pray or read from the Qur'an, because most of the time they won't get shamed for not doing so, however, come Ramadan, they do get shamed by their peers and family for not fasting, so they fast so they don't get looked down on by their holier-than-thou friends, I doubt some of them fast because they sincerely want to, they probably scoff on goodies when nobody's looking.
    As a 16 year old muslim who plays tennis competitively, I can guarantee that what you said is bull, and a lie. God knows if you have eaten or not, if you do take sneak bites then you don't understand the meaning of fasting.

    I have faced some rough situations when playing tennis matchs while fasting, and i am proud that i haven't drank or eaten anything during them
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    (Original post by jmlkey)
    If you manage to entirely saturate glycogen stores whilst eating at a caloric deficit, the resulting fat will then be used, because of the deficit.
    If you're eating at a surplus, well, we know you'll gain fat anyway.

    My point was whether calories are coming from carbs, or the carbs are coming at night, is all irrelevant in terms of fat gain.
    Also, i'm not sure that saturation is likely to occur after having fasted for a whole day. You'd be running pretty low on glycogen.

    This has been my fault, I've just not explained what i meant very well. Apologies
    by pigging out at night, you clear any calorie deficit anyway. And eating prior to sleep is more likely to create a spike and surplus becuase of the period of physical inactivity that follows ( sleep). Most muslims consume large amounts of high calorie food at night time becuase they are so hungry (chicken cottage on Broad st birmingham at 2 am was a good place to observe this mass phenoneman)
    reversing the eating cyling during ramadan is dumb in all sorts of ways, becuase it creates a glyocgen dip in the day time when your body ( and brain) needs it and creates a surplus when it doesnt ( at sleep). The reason for this is simple, 7th century desert arab tribes had no understanding of the human digestive cycle.
    But we do nowadays, so there is no excuse for such daft practice.
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    (Original post by Indo-Chinese Food)
    by pigging out at night, you clear any calorie deficit anyway. And eating prior to sleep is more likely to create a spike and surplus becuase of the period of physical inactivity that follows ( sleep). Most muslims consume large amounts of high calorie food at night time becuase they are so hungry (chicken cottage on Broad st birmingham at 2 am was a good place to observe this mass phenoneman)
    reversing the eating cyling during ramadan is dumb in all sorts of ways, becuase it creates a glyocgen dip in the day time when your body ( and brain) needs it and creates a surplus when it doesnt ( at sleep). The reason for this is simple, 7th century desert arab tribes had no understanding of the human digestive cycle.
    But we do nowadays, so there is no excuse for such daft practice.
    Why are you so obsessed with Muslim and Islam? You're literally in every Muslim and Islam related thread I've come across. What's it to you if you see some people ''pigging out'' when fasting closes? It's their life, let them do what they want. Not everyone goes overboard during Iftaari time, I love how you like to generalise greatly in your posts.
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    (Original post by Mortalengines)
    You obviously don't know any Muslims. A majority of Muslims do fast 'properly' in the 'modern day' and don't eat (or drink) during the day and just eat at night - I've been doing it since I was 7 years old (not out of force mind, but because I wanted to). Unless you're saying no one doesn't eat anything for an entire month?! Of course no body would do that as it would lead to death (or very serious anorexia).

    To answer OP, Islam should technically not have any force behind it, of course families tend to pressurize their kids (luckily mine don't) but ultimately, its a do it if you want to sort of thing. You know its good that you do it but it's your choice in the end. I have taken days off due to illness but I always redo them before next fast - it's the same for most muslims.

    But if you're gonna do it and be angry or take it out on others than don't do it at all - at least that's how Islam sees it.

    All in all though, you get use to it very quickly. I've been doing it since I was young, so I don't feel anything from it anymore. It's all about will power, I've always been strong willed so fasting really doesn't affect me at all.


    No that is exactly what i was saying - the fasting ritual that islam has copied orignated from the Sabian ritual of fasting for 30 days ( no food at all day or night) during a festival for a sun Deity, only water and pinch of salt. People have fasted for as long as this, it isnt impossible so long as you are consuming water, and modern sicnece is suggessting there are health benefits for doing so and there are many sports science diets that use full fasting- water only principles. there are disdvanteages for doing so also obviously
    My point was ramadan isnt a proper fast becuase you only fast for max 12 or awake hours, then stuff faces with food at night time.
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    (Original post by Jordan_1)
    Fasting is stupid. So glad Im not religious.
    Not true. I won't get involved in the religious ramifications of fasting because I don't know them and would rather saying nothing than appear ignorant. But in terms of health and diet fasting is actually very beneficial. Fasting every other day helps to regulate your blood sugar and cholesterol and can stave off binge eating on non-fasting days. For religious reasons or not, everyone could do with a little fasting every now and again.
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    (Original post by Teatania)
    Not true. I won't get involved in the religious ramifications of fasting because I don't know them and would rather saying nothing than appear ignorant. But in terms of health and diet fasting is actually very beneficial. Fasting every other day helps to regulate your blood sugar and cholesterol and can stave off binge eating on non-fasting days. For religious reasons or not, everyone could do with a little fasting every now and again.
    Have you been watching BBC documentaries? Hehe. I recently watched the documentary on CRON and alternate day fasting, and while the fasting technique appears impressive, I think it's exaggerated. They make the point about reducing the growth of new cells, but contradict themselves when they say that fasting stimulates brain cell growth? I will need more convincing via medical papers before I'll accept that fasting is healthy.

    Surely more healthy than alternate day fasting is having healthy days every day..? I would vastly prefer CRON to the fasting.
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    (Original post by Theafricanlegend)
    As a 16 year old muslim who plays tennis competitively, I can guarantee that what you said is bull, and a lie. God knows if you have eaten or not, if you do take sneak bites then you don't understand the meaning of fasting.

    I have faced some rough situations when playing tennis matchs while fasting, and i am proud that i haven't drank or eaten anything during them
    Well done. I really mean that. I think my first post was a little misunderstood. I wasn't saying Muslims do. I was just questioning the premise of this thread. If someone really wants to have a bite, big deal.. Whether someone chooses to fast or not is their own business.

    This idea that all Muslims keep this fasts is rubbish - I know that from personal experience. On the other hand, equally, the idea that all young Muslims keep it just to please their families or that they'll have their head chopped off is complete nonsense.

    Sorry for any misunderstanding.

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