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Going to a doctor/sports expert to answer all the broscience questions/myths

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    has anyone thought about doing this before? there is so much broscience surrounding lifting/fitness in general and a lot of anecdotal evidence. things like does lifting stunt growth in teenagers, does a high protein diet damage your kidneys, does working out cause hair loss, does squatting below parallel damage your knees, is it bad to eat carbohydrates late in the day etc. i could go on and on. i want all the broscience myths put to rest because i cant find a definite answer for most of them on the internet.
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    have u ever wondered if there is no definite answer for your questions.....

    working out causes hair loss :facepalm2:
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    I think all of those have already been answered by hard science.
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    (Original post by Movember)
    has anyone thought about doing this before? there is so much broscience surrounding lifting/fitness in general and a lot of anecdotal evidence. things like does lifting stunt growth in teenagers, does a high protein diet damage your kidneys, does working out cause hair loss, does squatting below parallel damage your knees, is it bad to eat carbohydrates late in the day etc. i could go on and on. i want all the broscience myths put to rest because i cant find a definite answer for most of them on the internet.
    Stop looking general internet sites and find some academic research. All of these questions have been answered. The academic research, assuming it's up to date, will often give you better information than your doctors.

    As for the questions you asked; no, no, no, no and it depends on your goals and the type of carbohydrate.
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    A lot of doctors haven't a clue when it comes down to bodybuilding type questions. Nhs physios haven't a clue either
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    (Original post by tooosh)
    I think all of those have already been answered by hard science.

    (Original post by ChaoticMaster)
    Stop looking general internet sites and find some academic research. All of these questions have been answered. The academic research, assuming it's up to date, will often give you better information than your doctors.

    As for the questions you asked; no, no, no, no and it depends on your goals and the type of carbohydrate.
    QFT, OP read the academic journal articles
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    1) as others have said, there is no reason why a doctor would know anything about recent scientific research into these issues

    2) you need to take scientific studies with caution and avoid generalizing them too much, many studies will (eg) investigate whether a weight program works by using subjects who have never touched been to a gym before, and monitoring them monitoring them for 2 weeks to see how much muscle they gain. Its highly debatable whether you can extrapolate these results to trained bodybuilders/athletes. Similarly a lot of studies on nutrition (particularly diet studies) tend to confuse compliance with whether a diet works nutritionally; you will often find claims like "The group following diet A lost 6lbs on average in 2 months while the group following diet B lost 8lbs", however it wont be clear whether this is because diet A was harder to stick to, so more people cheated on their meal plans, or whether it was actually worse given equal compliance (90% of the literature on low-carb diets is horrible for this reason).
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    Hey, OP

    Instead of worrying about the minutiae (as you always seem to do), why not just get down a gym and train real hard for like 5-10 years. Your bull**** detector will be so awesome after 5 years of hard training you won't need to ask these questions because you would have found out the answers for yourself (and gotten much bigger and stronger in the process).
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    (Original post by Old School)
    Hey, OP

    Instead of worrying about the minutiae (as you always seem to do), why not just get down a gym and train real hard for like 5-10 years. Your bull**** detector will be so awesome after 5 years of hard training you won't need to ask these questions because you would have found out the answers for yourself (and gotten much bigger and stronger in the process).
    By that logic, OP should go and "risk" losing his hair and destroying his kidneys over 10 years rather than achieving his goals in 5 years and not doing things that are known to be risky? Knowledge is power, and in the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.
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    (Original post by HFerguson)
    By that logic, OP should go and "risk" losing his hair and destroying his kidneys over 10 years rather than achieving his goals in 5 years and not doing things that are known to be risky? Knowledge is power, and in the land of the blind, the one eyed man is king.
    Says the guy who can't squat 3 plates after how many years of training?

    Look, I'm all for knowledge and stuff especially when it comes to evidence based medicine etc. but when it comes to exercise too many people get caught up in studies and **** when really they should be doing 3 things:

    1) Squatting, pressing, pulling- hard, heavy and consistently

    2) Conditioning- sprints (or cool variations thereof) tyre flips, farmer's walks etc.

    3) Eating right- If you're fat, eat less if you're small, eat more

    I don't care what the evidence base says, if you do all of those things week in, week out for a long time you're going to be stronger than 100% of the general population, 99% of people who 'work out' and be towards the top end of the hardcore who don't compete. You'll look pretty awesome too.

    This is fact. Unfortuantly, it's hard and people don't like doing things that are hard and would prefer to sit and use things like the possibility of 'kidney damage' or 'hair loss' (ffs) as excuses to sit on their arse and read studies. Or, they sit on their arse and read studies looking for the 'best most super awesome training program ever!' instead of training, conditioning and eating.

    I know I've probably come across as a dick but don't get me wrong- I respect you and I respect your knowledge but it's obvious that, for people like you and OP, a little less thinking and a little more doing would go a long, long way.
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    There is a lot of broscience within the realm of medical profession. A doctor isn't a researcher and a GP is essentially just a secretary acting as a gatekeeper to NHS services. A lot of times they are just blindly following clinical guidelines. Don't get me wrong, I am not berating the job that GPs do - I think it is important but am just stating that often, they don't know that much about things, especially about the minutiae of stuff that is outside the realm of general health.

    I have heard a lot of **** from actual medical practioners e.g. GPs sending people for homeopathy.
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    (Original post by Old School)
    Hey, OP

    Instead of worrying about the minutiae (as you always seem to do), why not just get down a gym and train real hard for like 5-10 years. Your bull**** detector will be so awesome after 5 years of hard training you won't need to ask these questions because you would have found out the answers for yourself (and gotten much bigger and stronger in the process).
    i dont want to find out 10 years down the line that i ruined my kidneys because i was predisposed to weak kidneys in my genetics. i care about my health.
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    (Original post by Old School)
    This is fact. Unfortuantly, it's hard and people don't like doing things that are hard and would prefer to sit and use things like the possibility of 'kidney damage' or 'hair loss' (ffs) as excuses to sit on their arse and read studies.
    I'm not disagreeing with anything you wrote, yeah it may be hard, but I don't think that's why so many people don't want to do it; I think it's because a lot of people are unwilling to sacrifice their perfectly manicured image and ego. You can include me in that majority, unfortunately. I could be wrong though, what the **** do I know, I mean I can't even squat 3plates



    (Original post by Mark85)
    There is a lot of broscience within the realm of medical profession. A doctor isn't a researcher and a GP is essentially just a secretary acting as a gatekeeper to NHS services. A lot of times they are just blindly following clinical guidelines. Don't get me wrong, I am not berating the job that GPs do - I think it is important but am just stating that often, they don't know that much about things, especially about the minutiae of stuff that is outside the realm of general health.

    I have heard a lot of **** from actual medical practioners e.g. GPs sending people for homeopathy.
    Unfortunate amount of truth in this - GPs are, generally, ****. It's their job to be able to distinguish between **** that won't kill you and **** that will (or close to). It's sad that 50% of medical students eventually become GPs, but we need GPs. I hate that you have to go through a GP to access the NHS, like a gatekeeper. If you find a good one, stick with them. However, in specialities, there's actually not much THAT much broscience - all the guidelines that do exist are based on empirical evidence; as that evidence body evolves, so too our guidelines.
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    This page has wet my appetite ha. Firstly I can't squat 3 plates either, due to the fact that 2 plates on one side of the bar and 1 on the other doesn't work I just fall on my arse.

    Knowledge is definitely power HFerguson, why do so many people join the gym in January and by mid year a lot have giving in? I'd put that down to a lack of knowledge.

    If your telling a beginner to lift heavy weights consistently, yes i'm sure they would see an immediate improvement but their most likely to a. become bored with their training and b. most importantly overtrain!

    And the answers to your question Movember, training doesn't stunt a teenagers growth but they should be supervised at all times, taught the correct training techniques and be physically mature. Your body doesn't store protein like it does carbohydrates so excessive amounts will just be excreted. Not sure about the hair loss one ha. As long as your not image and can squat properly then you should squat below parallel, great for flexibility and look at weightlifters guys front and overhead squatting nearly double their body weight in each respective lift.
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    (Original post by jmlkey)
    :facepalm2:
    I think he was making an attempt at a joke...

    (Original post by tsulee20)
    and b. most importantly overtrain!
    Beginners cannot overtrain. They do not have the muscle mass nor the CNS capacity. They can fatigue and/or get injured, sure, but overtrain, no.
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    most of them have very general knowledge, much of which is outdated, or follows generally accepted anecdotal evidence.
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    (Original post by Movember)
    has anyone thought about doing this before? there is so much broscience surrounding lifting/fitness in general and a lot of anecdotal evidence. things like does lifting stunt growth in teenagers, does a high protein diet damage your kidneys, does working out cause hair loss, does squatting below parallel damage your knees, is it bad to eat carbohydrates late in the day etc. i could go on and on. i want all the broscience myths put to rest because i cant find a definite answer for most of them on the internet.
    It's better to check with the doctor than any site, I'd say, because your doctor will understand your physique and if you have any needs (if you're really young for instance it probably isn't a good idea to spend 50 hours a week doing bench presses! :P). I've looked a bit online and I don't think lifting stunts growth that much but doctors will be better informed than most people online :P

    Let me know how your research goes!
    Dan
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    (Original post by HFerguson)
    I think he was making an attempt at a joke...



    Beginners cannot overtrain. They do not have the muscle mass nor the CNS capacity. They can fatigue and/or get injured, sure, but overtrain, no.
    And where still relating this to a beginner performing heavy lifting constantly as suggested?
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    (Original post by tsulee20)
    And where still relating this to a beginner performing heavy lifting constantly as suggested?
    in English please?
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    Never heard of the term broscience before. I assume it means bullpoo that people say as if it's scientific fact in regards to bodybuilding/gym etc.

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