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Recovering from a dislocated elbow?

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    Dislocated my elbow. Now I'm worried about recovery.

    It's been a week but I am someone who likes to prepare well in advance for everything.

    The ortho surgeon told me I will lose some mobility. But I like to lift weights.

    I asked him about this and he said let's worry about your elbow first. Whatever.

    Anyways, I wanted to ask if anyone has dislocated their elbow, their recovery time, and what to do to assist a speedy and FULL RECOVERY.

    I also wanted to ask whether you could lift normally e.g. bench press, shoulder press, bicep curl, tricep pressdowns etc. All those exercises which require elbow flexion.
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    I've dislocated my elbow twice: once when I was about 8 then a year later, so about age 9. Of course at that age I didn't exercise heavily but I still wanted mobility back in my arm, because wearing a sling for months on end is extremely annoying. :lol:

    The length of time would depend on multiple factors; for example, is your arm in a cast? If so, I had mine on for at least 6 weeks, and wasn't allowed to participate in any strenuous exercise during that time. The first time, once the cast was removed, I had a course of physiotherapy, where I was taught basic yoga-like stretches where I had to put more and more weight onto my arm muscles. Also, I would suggest swimming: it is a seemingly easy workout that forces you to use your arm; afterwards, you will definitely feel the benefit.

    As for recovery time, my arm took about a year to fully recover. I could use it within weeks of the cast being removed, but I often suffered - and still do when the weather is very cold - from aching joints and muscle weakness. Then again, I was a lot younger than you are now, and didn't have toned muscles as you would have from lifting weights; your recovery time should be less, I presume.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, or quote me on it, but you may be left with a weakness in the joint: hence why I dislocated my elbow again a year later. I wouldn't try to rush into any taxing routine because you may end up doing more damage than good; once you start lifting again, I would be careful. If you're sensible, you will know when your arm has had enough, and when to let it rest.

    I hope I have been slightly helpful, and that you recover soon!
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    I once dislocated both shoulders simultaneously and I fully second the swimming, it's low impact against your elbow, which is presumably very sore currently. I must emphasise that you must not work out as you normally do when before your elbow was dislocated as you risk doing more serious or permanent damage to it.

    For weights I'd recommend doing a smaller amounts of lifts/curls etc or whatnot and on a smaller weight so you can keep doing your weights but putting a lot less strain on the elbow.
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    (Original post by Lainathiel)
    I've dislocated my elbow twice: once when I was about 8 then a year later, so about age 9. Of course at that age I didn't exercise heavily but I still wanted mobility back in my arm, because wearing a sling for months on end is extremely annoying. :lol:

    The length of time would depend on multiple factors; for example, is your arm in a cast? If so, I had mine on for at least 6 weeks, and wasn't allowed to participate in any strenuous exercise during that time. The first time, once the cast was removed, I had a course of physiotherapy, where I was taught basic yoga-like stretches where I had to put more and more weight onto my arm muscles. Also, I would suggest swimming: it is a seemingly easy workout that forces you to use your arm; afterwards, you will definitely feel the benefit.

    As for recovery time, my arm took about a year to fully recover. I could use it within weeks of the cast being removed, but I often suffered - and still do when the weather is very cold - from aching joints and muscle weakness. Then again, I was a lot younger than you are now, and didn't have toned muscles as you would have from lifting weights; your recovery time should be less, I presume.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much, or quote me on it, but you may be left with a weakness in the joint: hence why I dislocated my elbow again a year later. I wouldn't try to rush into any taxing routine because you may end up doing more damage than good; once you start lifting again, I would be careful. If you're sensible, you will know when your arm has had enough, and when to let it rest.

    I hope I have been slightly helpful, and that you recover soon!
    Thanks for the post.

    Hmm, I see.

    I guess I'll have to take this LONG and slow then. Guess all the work I've done over the past few months will be undone

    My arm is currently in a cast. I've regained control of my left hand, and can open and close without any problems.

    That is my greatest worry you see - the fact I've dislocated it means it's more susceptible to injury again. How is your arm now? Do you have any PROBLEMS with it, especially when you do anything which bears weight or stress on your elbow joints? Also, are you able to throw a punch with this arm without any issues? (Have done kickboxing, want to get back into it after my arm has healed, lol).
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    (Original post by oz40)
    That is my greatest worry you see - the fact I've dislocated it means it's more susceptible to injury again. How is your arm now? Do you have any PROBLEMS with it, especially when you do anything which bears weight or stress on your elbow joints? Also, are you able to throw a punch with this arm without any issues? (Have done kickboxing, want to get back into it after my arm has healed, lol).
    Nope, it's fine now. I don't lift weights or anything, but with my everyday activities it's perfectly fine. The only time where I notice it at all is in the dead of a bad winter; some mornings I will wake up and my arm muscles will be very stiff, like I have damaged them in some way. After having a shower/doing some light physio it's usually okay, and it doesn't affect me from doing something, it's just a bit of a nuisance. The kickboxing should be okay: I used to do karate and I think it helped build up my muscles a bit more, which were obviously rather weak after it had been practically stationary for several months. Again, I would take it easy and listen to your body if it needs rest, but if you think you are okay, I would say go for it.
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    Also, if you're thinking of doing a routine which involves running and similar activities, be careful, and secure it in some way. I first dislocated my elbow by falling off a trampoline, the second by falling over on a perfectly flat floor. :lol: I'm not trying to worry you, but it can happen. Or perhaps not: maybe I'm just awkward, which is very likely.
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    Ah right.

    Well I'm taking two tablets of glucosamine everyday. It's supposed to be beneficial for joints. I hope this will accelerate my healing.

    But I'll heed your advice and take it slow! Will probably stick to bodyweight exercises instead of weight training for the time being.
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    Does glucosamine have similar benefits to cod liver oil jointwise?
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    Is cod liver oil necessary or can one simply use omega 3?

    edit: Cod liver oil seems to contain Vitamin D and A in addition. No need to take it then - I already get vit A and D in my diet.

    Yes, glucosamine appears to be beneficial for joints.
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    (Original post by Lainathiel)
    Nope, it's fine now. I don't lift weights or anything, but with my everyday activities it's perfectly fine. The only time where I notice it at all is in the dead of a bad winter; some mornings I will wake up and my arm muscles will be very stiff, like I have damaged them in some way. After having a shower/doing some light physio it's usually okay, and it doesn't affect me from doing something, it's just a bit of a nuisance. The kickboxing should be okay: I used to do karate and I think it helped build up my muscles a bit more, which were obviously rather weak after it had been practically stationary for several months. Again, I would take it easy and listen to your body if it needs rest, but if you think you are okay, I would say go for it.
    Hi

    I had my cast removed today.

    My arm is so freaking stiff.

    The physio booked me an appointment next week.

    I can't move it at all. Got any exercises?
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    (Original post by oz40)
    Hi

    I had my cast removed today.

    My arm is so freaking stiff.

    The physio booked me an appointment next week.

    I can't move it at all. Got any exercises?
    Aww; I can sympathise! Don't worry, it won't be long until it's back to normal.
    The physio will, of course, have personally tailored exercises which are suited to your needs, but in the meantime I would again suggest swimming, and any other stretch that encourages you to extend your arm further than 90 degrees. The most useful one I was taught was to go on all fours, making sure your weight is equally distributed. When this is comfortable, lift your normal arm up, thereby shifting the weight onto your affected arm. When you have practised this and are fully comfortable, lift the leg on the same side to the arm that is injured. Although I was quite young at the time and this probably would have affected it, I found this quite difficult, and it definitely helped build my arm muscles back up.

    If you do not have enough time to practise, I would suggest you stretch your arm during your everyday activities. It won't look that obvious; even when walking down the street, just try and move your arm as best you can so that it is at 180 degrees: a straight line. Remember: this will take time, so don't get frustrated if you don't get results immediately.

    Good luck, and get well soon!
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    (Original post by robo donkey)
    I once dislocated both shoulders simultaneously
    Randomly...how did you do that? I once did the same incline benching with a bar on my own few years back
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    (Original post by rattyryan)
    Randomly...how did you do that? I once did the same incline benching with a bar on my own few years back
    It was a strange one, I fell into the bath as I was running it and put my arms to stop me falling on either side of the tub and they both popped, which led to me going straight back to hospital. On the plus side I'd come out of hospital that same morning from something else the night before and ended up back in the same bed for a while longer. *sigh*

    Something to talk about I guess

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