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How much to run a car excluding car insurance?

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    (Original post by Ishy_Blackburn)
    This is one of the reasons I really want a car, the freedom it gives you and the independence. Plus if I'm getting the train everyday that'll cost me about a tenner and a bus bass is about 200 quid, worth it? Only thing I'm hesistant about is maintaning my car and cost if something goes wrong with it.

    Cheers for all the tips and advice so far guys.
    That's one of the few downsides of car ownership - the costs if something goes wrong. Not only because it's potentially expensive, but also because it's unpredictable.

    I've been really lucky with my car, it's done 91k and the only things that have needed replacing other than consumables (filters, tyres, etc) are the rear section of the exhaust (could have been repaired for about 20-30GBP, but I opted to get a new exhaust as I had more money than sense at the time, cost about 210GBP) and some rubber bushings on the suspension (about 80GBP).

    I know that things can go wrong very suddenly and they can be very expensive to fix sometimes. I have a 750GBP overdraft with my student bank account, which I can use if something unexpected happens. I'd recommend opening a student bank account, the overdraft is very reassuring just knowing it's there, plus you get many other benefits such as free travel insurance, some banks even give you free railcards and stuff. I've never used the overdraft though, fortunately. If you don't want a student account, I'd highly recommend you keep at least 500 or so in a savings account/isa, and keep it in case something happens, or perhaps your parents might be able to lend you the money and you pay them back?

    The thing about public transport is that it caters to the needs of everyone, hence you're limited on where you can go, at what time, and how long it takes to get there. A journey that takes as little as 20 mins by car can easily take over 4 times as long on the bus, as the bus will have to stop numerous times between the start of the journey and the destination, and while in a car you can just go through the most direct route, the bus may have to go through many different housing estates and towns, and stop at all the stops there.

    Cars can be quite expensive, but they are very useful. I believe that the convenience that they bring is more than worth the costs that come with them.
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    (Original post by NewFolder)
    That's one of the few downsides of car ownership - the costs if something goes wrong. Not only because it's potentially expensive, but also because it's unpredictable.

    I've been really lucky with my car, it's done 91k and the only things that have needed replacing other than consumables (filters, tyres, etc) are the rear section of the exhaust (could have been repaired for about 20-30GBP, but I opted to get a new exhaust as I had more money than sense at the time, cost about 210GBP) and some rubber bushings on the suspension (about 80GBP).

    I know that things can go wrong very suddenly and they can be very expensive to fix sometimes. I have a 750GBP overdraft with my student bank account, which I can use if something unexpected happens. I'd recommend opening a student bank account, the overdraft is very reassuring just knowing it's there, plus you get many other benefits such as free travel insurance, some banks even give you free railcards and stuff. I've never used the overdraft though, fortunately. If you don't want a student account, I'd highly recommend you keep at least 500 or so in a savings account/isa, and keep it in case something happens, or perhaps your parents might be able to lend you the money and you pay them back?

    The thing about public transport is that it caters to the needs of everyone, hence you're limited on where you can go, at what time, and how long it takes to get there. A journey that takes as little as 20 mins by car can easily take over 4 times as long on the bus, as the bus will have to stop numerous times between the start of the journey and the destination, and while in a car you can just go through the most direct route, the bus may have to go through many different housing estates and towns, and stop at all the stops there.

    Cars can be quite expensive, but they are very useful. I believe that the convenience that they bring is more than worth the costs that come with them.
    Yeah I'm trying to weigh up all the benefits against the costs, seems pretty even so far. Big factor as it always is is money. Just bit wary about maintaining it, especially if I need to save.

    Got a student account, had an overdraft but relied on it too much so not making that mistake again but could always borrow off patents I suppose.

    Is it a lot to maintain a car then, especially if I use it a lot for motorway driving? I'm guessing it's one of then things that depends on the car, age, mileage etc.


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    (Original post by Ishy_Blackburn)
    Yeah I'm trying to weigh up all the benefits against the costs, seems pretty even so far. Big factor as it always is is money. Just bit wary about maintaining it, especially if I need to save.

    Got a student account, had an overdraft but relied on it too much so not making that mistake again but could always borrow off patents I suppose.

    Is it a lot to maintain a car then, especially if I use it a lot for motorway driving? I'm guessing it's one of then things that depends on the car, age, mileage etc.

    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    As long as nothing goes wrong with it, an oil change every 6000 miles and a service every year or so will do it fine, if you do 12k a year it'll cost about £150-£200 a year for this maintenance, if you do 6k a year, you could probably get away with a two-yearly service, so £30-40 for an oil change one year and £120-£160 for the service the next year.
    Then you have to pay for the tax, currently £135 a year, could increase as it often does :unimpressed:
    Then you have petrol. Depending on your car's fuel efficiency and the price of petrol, this will cost you anywhere between 25p and 10p per mile, so for 6k miles it'll be between £600 and £1500, for 12k it'll be £1200 to £3000, although with you doing mostly motorway miles it'll probably be nearer to the lower price.

    I have a savings account for if my car needs repairs or anything, and I have never had to take money out of it. I'd advise you to do something similar, or use your overdraft etc, that's what your overdraft is there for really. If all else fails I suppose you could borrow a small amount from your parents and pay them back when you have the money.

    As long as your car is in good working order and serviced every year or every 12000 miles, nothing major should go wrong with it, I've never had a problem with my car other than minor repairs and consumable parts.

    As long as you can afford it, which you should be able to if you're living at home, you'll be fine.

    One more thing to consider though.. does your university have free parking? If not you'll have to factor in the cost of this, or maybe park on a free car park or a road nearby and walk a short distance there to save a bit of money
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    It may sound daft, but try looking at a more modern car. Something on the new type of reg plate is ideal. Avoid the typical teenager Corsa/Clio/Fiesta/Puntos and you'll be OK. I drive a more unusual car for my age, a diesel 307 estate. I pound it up and down the motorways for work and I get 63 mpg on cruise control. Town driving is not ideal with it as it has a dpf which clogs in low speed driving, so with diesel @ 1.40 per litre in my area and 10k per year @ let's say for the sake of arguing that it averages 55mpg overall, that means around £1800 per year in diesel. Plus £120 per year tax (if you buy a car regd before 1/3/01 it's always £215 per year) then about £50 for MoT then wear and tear and that all depends on the car. I put so many new parts on my Megane and had so many problems with it that it cost a fortune. My current 307 has been faultless in comparison but it will need a new clutch soon and @144k the cambelt wants changing, and I'm on 128k now!
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    Thanks for all the advice, still in two minds and got a lot of thinking to do but I've got a much clearer picture now.


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