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Nobel Prize vs Fields Medal?

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    I have looked online everywhere in search for some guidance but I couldn't find anything. So I am currently reading A-levels and I have a few questions regarding these two prestigious prizes.

    1. If I was to go after one, which one would be more worth the effort? I hear it is harder to get the Fields Medal as they give them out every 4 years, whereas the Nobel Prize is annual.

    2. What extra curricula reading should I do? I hear that "A Letter to a Young Mathematician" by Ian Stewart is a great start, any other recommendations? (Btw if I was to go for the Nobel Prize I definitely go for the Physics 1 as I am quite good at maths)

    3. How long would it take for me to accomplish such a thing? I don't want to be still working on this after I finish university.

    4. Prize money?

    5. Which university should I go to? apparently the University of Oxbridge has a lot of almuni who have accomplished such a thing so would I be advantaged in going there?
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    (Original post by JustReallyRandom)
    I have looked online everywhere in search for some guidance but I couldn't find anything. So I am currently reading A-levels and I have a few questions regarding these two prestigious prizes.

    1. If I was to go after one, which one would be more worth the effort? I hear it is harder to get the Fields Medal as they give them out every 4 years, whereas the Nobel Prize is annual.

    2. What extra curricula reading should I do? I hear that "A Letter to a Young Mathematician" by Ian Stewart is a great start, any other recommendations? (Btw if I was to go for the Nobel Prize I definitely go for the Physics 1 as I am quite good at maths)

    3. How long would it take for me to accomplish such a thing? I don't want to be still working on this after I finish university.

    4. Prize money?

    5. Which university should I go to? apparently the University of Oxbridge has a lot of almuni who have accomplished such a thing so would I be advantaged in going there?
    There is no Nobel Prize for Mathematics. Fields Medals and Nobel Prizes aren't everyday accomplishments and to be awarded one; your achievement must be truly groundbreaking.

    You will still be working on this until you finish university - for the rest of your life potentially(Nobel Prize only I think - fields medal is 40 and under).

    In 2006 for example the winner was awarded the Fields Medal for solving one of the millenium problems - the Poincaré Conjecture. He declined to accept it, which kind of proves that for some, it is the accomplishment in itself that makes the work worthwhile, rather than the awards.
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    Nobel Prize for Physics
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    A Nobel prize for physics is typically awarded years after the publication to which it relates, you'd stand a better chance at the peace prize which is sometimes awarded for things the recipient hasn't event done yet (eg Mr B Obama)
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    there's no guide to winning a nobel prize man.
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    Sorry dude. But given this is TSR, your post isn't even totally random.

    Better luck trolling next time? If you had actually said something completely random it could have been funny.
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    (Original post by JustReallyRandom)
    I have looked online everywhere in search for some guidance but I couldn't find anything. So I am currently reading A-levels and I have a few questions regarding these two prestigious prizes.

    1. If I was to go after one, which one would be more worth the effort? I hear it is harder to get the Fields Medal as they give them out every 4 years, whereas the Nobel Prize is annual.

    2. What extra curricula reading should I do? I hear that "A Letter to a Young Mathematician" by Ian Stewart is a great start, any other recommendations? (Btw if I was to go for the Nobel Prize I definitely go for the Physics 1 as I am quite good at maths)

    3. How long would it take for me to accomplish such a thing? I don't want to be still working on this after I finish university.

    4. Prize money?

    5. Which university should I go to? apparently the University of Oxbridge has a lot of almuni who have accomplished such a thing so would I be advantaged in going there?
    Are you serious?
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Sorry dude. But given this is TSR, your post isn't even totally random.

    Better luck trolling next time? If you had actually said something completely random it could have been funny.
    I actually thought the "University of Oxbridge" bit was quite funny.
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    (Original post by JustReallyRandom)
    I have looked online everywhere in search for some guidance but I couldn't find anything. So I am currently reading A-levels and I have a few questions regarding these two prestigious prizes.
    Hello Mr Random,

    I am a Nigerian Prince and I will like to give to you my Nobel prize as you are like a son to me. Just send to me your banking numbers and I will send it to you in the electronic post.

    Looking forward to acquaintancing you,

    Nigerian prince
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    I have a few Pullitzer prizes lying around. I studied at the University of Ivy League in America and also attended Bobo College at Camford.

    I also hold an honorary degree from the LSE Medical School and am Chancellor of the University of Burnley.
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    OP you seem to have potential to win both. If you would contemplate continuing your research after university, try for the Abel Prize too, which my mate John Milnor tells me is piss. All Souls College Oxford would be a decent choice, but the University of *Oggsbridge is fine too
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    (Original post by scherzi)
    OP you seem to have potential to win both. If you would contemplate continuing your research after university, try for the Abel Prize too, which my mate John Milnor tells me is piss. All Souls College Oxford would be a decent choice, but the University of *Oggsbridge is fine too
    Given how sparse the student body is at All Souls, that's going to be one interesting Summer Ball lol!
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    Serious responses only please.
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    (Original post by JustReallyRandom)
    Serious responses only please.
    In all seriousness, Witten is the only physicist who ever received the Fields Medal so I suggest you become a physicist but aim to win the Fields Medal. That way you will be almost unique.

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Updated: November 1, 2012
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