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What is the feminist objection to "Blurred Lines"?

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    I've heard this song so much lately that it's been bugging me exactly what this feminist outcry about this song is. To me the lyrics are quite innocuous. Risque, certainly, and full of objectifying words, but nothing that sets it apart from other songs, and nothing that appears to condone rape.
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    i really don't see the problem. it's nowhere near as bad as other songs but yet it seems like loads more people have a problem with it.
    robin thicke, pharrel and TI have all come out and said 'it was just a bit of fun'.
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    It's just feminist trying to find something to be outraged at badly. I think they object mostly to that line "I know you want it" because it's the kind of **** rapist would say.
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    It's just as sexist towards men, look at how they're objectified for being successful and having status.
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    It describes a woman who is "blasted" (i.e. too drunk/high to consent to anything) with the line "I know you want it". Can you see why some people might not be ok with that?
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    (Original post by sugar-n-spice)
    It's just as sexist towards men, look at how they're objectified for being successful and having status.
    Is that sarcastic? I see no references to success and status in that song whatsoever. If anything, the woman is the one implied to have high status, she's the "hottest bitch in this place" and is being approached by plenty of men...
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    (Original post by L-x)
    It describes a woman who is "blasted" (i.e. too drunk/high to consent to anything) with the line "I know you want it". Can you see why some people might not be ok with that?
    I suppose, but I don't see why anyone would assume "blasted" means "insensible" given the sort of exaggeration these rappers are prone to. Also, the line is apparently "talk about getting blasted", which frankly could mean anything. Does "I know you want it" automatically imply rape, in your view?
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    (Original post by L-x)
    It describes a woman who is "blasted" (i.e. too drunk/high to consent to anything) with the line "I know you want it". Can you see why some people might not be ok with that?
    How is it describing a girl who is blasted? http://rapgenius.com/Robin-thicke-blurred-lines-lyrics - Read up.
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    What is so bad about objectification? It's not as if we have time to get to know every ****ing random person who appears in pictures and films.
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    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    What is so bad about objectification? It's not as if we have time to get to know every ****ing random person who appears in pictures and films.
    I do agree with you, but that's a separate debate. There's plenty of objectification in this song and in music that I'm sure people could object to on a systemic basis. I'm just wondering why it's this song particularly that's got the feminists' hackles up considering it doesn't seem to be any more or less objectifying than most other songs in the genre.

    Has it simply been a particularly successful song? Certainly seems to have had an annoying amount of airplay.
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    Since when did "blasted" mean someone is unable to consent to anything?

    Anyone offended by Blurred Lines needs to stop reading so much into it and getting angry for the sake of it. It's utterly pathetic. If anything the song is saying that its ok for women to be sexual and liberate themselves.

    Also it's funny how, for example Rihanna sings CONSTANTLY about getting d*ck and that's ok but Blurred Lines isn't?
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Is that sarcastic? I see no references to success and status in that song whatsoever. If anything, the woman is the one implied to have high status, she's the "hottest bitch in this place" and is being approached by plenty of men...
    The references are all visual. You have a well groomed, sharply dressed Robin Thicke, it implies wealth it implies status status, these are his attributes as a man which are being objectified. In fact, apart from Pharrell in his silver shell-suit, the men wear clothes which imply they are wealthy throughout the video, shirts, jackets etc.
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    (Original post by sugar-n-spice)
    The references are all visual. You have a well groomed, sharply dressed Robin Thicke, it implies wealth it implies status status, these are his attributes as a man which are being objectified. In fact, apart from Pharrell in his silver shell-suit, the men wear clothes which imply they are wealthy throughout the video, shirts, jackets etc.
    Well, that's the genre for you. Rappers project that image because their fans aspire to that brand of success. I never watch music videos myself, I was just going by the lyrics of the song. I don't think it's to do with men vs women, it's just an important part of the artists' image.
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    they used the word 'liberate' a bit, so if anything the feminists should be happy.

    i don't like the video/song but its not offensive.
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    obviously nothing is wrong with the song but i imagine feminista will be so butthurt about it that they'll go on live tv again and get owned.
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    (Original post by Annoying-Mouse)
    How is it describing a girl who is blasted? http://rapgenius.com/Robin-thicke-blurred-lines-lyrics - Read up.
    Talk about getting blasted/I hate these blurred lines.

    There's no blurred line if someone is blasted. There's a big clear line which says no.

    @scrotgrot

    No, "I know you want it" doesn't automatically imply rape. It is, however one of the most common way rape is excused/justified. Can you see, therefore, why people have been offended by it's use?
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    the problem I have with the music video is that all the women look like sex toys. you see the men looking all successful and the women look like they are objects not people. its like when men have lots of sex they are seen as successful but when a woman does I she is half a person and not worthy of any respect as if that makes her a bad person or even worse not important.what the hell is wrong with women liking sex its called a libido and if it is wrong why is it okay for men to do it!!
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    Pffffttttt, this 50 Cent song makes it look like a nursery rhyme:




    Feminists are just looking for an excuse to complain about anything nowadays.
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    (Original post by Kiss)
    Pffffttttt, this 50 Cent song makes it look like a nursery rhyme:




    Feminists are just looking for an excuse to complain about anything nowadays.
    maybe. but it doesn't make it any less wrong.
    and what do you mean feminists are just looking for an excuse. if you were a woman I should hope you'd be upset.
    and I'm not a feminists I just don't like what the song portrays.
    I think that it got so much attention because its so famous - its been on the charts for six weeks straight.

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    I don't think that the song itself is the major issue. But the fact that the explicit video would be interpreted as an offence to women should be no surprise really. Feminism is all about equality and watching naked girls dance awkwardly around fully-dressed predatory men while they sing “do it like it hurt” is a pretty obvious imbalance.
Updated: July 30, 2013
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