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Edinburgh Medical school Applicants 2014

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    THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

    2014 PROSPECTIVE MEDICAL STUDENTS

    (MBChB programme)






    The picture is from the University of Edinburgh's College of medicine website.



    Well, I didn't see any thread for 2014 entry, so I thought it'd be good to start one.

    Is there anyone else who'll be applying to the UoE for medicine? :rolleyes:

    Good luck with your application everyone! Hope we'll meet in September 2014 and that we'll be coursemates.
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    In.

    Any questions guys, let me know!
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    i was thinking about applying to edinburgh for next year, i have 13 A*s at GCSE, 730 ukcat average and AAA predicted grades, but my AS levels were AABC, would i still be considered? i would drop the subject i got a C in this year, and carry on with the other 3 subjects, but i really don't know if my as levels would let me down and i wouldn't be considered? any help would be appreciated
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    (Original post by sammy999)
    i was thinking about applying to edinburgh for next year, i have 13 A*s at GCSE, 730 ukcat average and AAA predicted grades, but my AS levels were AABC, would i still be considered? i would drop the subject i got a C in this year, and carry on with the other 3 subjects, but i really don't know if my as levels would let me down and i wouldn't be considered? any help would be appreciated
    I'm afraid you wouldn't actually be considered with the C. The minimum entry requirements for Edinburgh are AAAb, so you just miss out.

    If you took the C onto A-level and dropped the B, you'd be considered, but don't do this just because it'll let you be considered. It'd be much better to study A-levels you enjoy rather than just studying something you don't like just to go to Edinburgh.
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    Is Edinburgh really competitive for English students
    I have:
    GCSE: 9A*s 2A
    AS Level: AAAAA IN biology, chemistry, maths , further maths and french
    A2 predictions (respectively): AA*A*A*A*
    UKCAT: 827.5

    Is my application competitive enough? (I mucked up a module and got a B but overall still got an A for biology)



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    (Original post by dadiamondz)
    Is Edinburgh really competitive for English students
    I have:
    GCSE: 9A*s 2A
    AS Level: AAAAA IN biology, chemistry, maths , further maths and french
    A2 predictions (respectively): AA*A*A*A*
    UKCAT: 827.5

    Is my application competitive enough? (I mucked up a module and got a B but overall still got an A for biology)
    Your only competition when you apply for Edinburgh is other students from England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. It's still just as competitive as it is for Scottish and EU students.

    The way it works at Scottish medical schools is that places are funded separately. So those from Scotland and the EU have a certain number of places allocated for them, because those students are eligible to have tuition fees paid for them by the government, whereas students from the rest of the UK (RUK) have to pay tuition fees. Hence, the places are entirely separate. At Edinburgh, there are about 200 places and they're split almost 50:50 between the Scots/EU and RUK groups.

    The academic side of your application is fantastic, and in fact, would get you a perfect score from the selectors. What you have to keep in mind, though, is that a big chunk of the selection process at Edinburgh looks at non-academic things, so that side of your application has to be good, too. I'm afraid I can't give you percentages right now because the UKCAT weighting is being shifted up to 16% from 8%, and I don't know whether it's academics or non-academics that suffers in their weighting.
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    Thanks - that's so helpful & clear !


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    (Original post by Almckeever)
    Ah good! I've just been told so many different things by different people, but it's good to talk to an Edinburgh student. What year are you? Yeah I've Ben worrying if I have enough medical work experience, it's just so are to get hold of, especially in my area. What specific areas of the non-academic qualities do they look at? I feel I have quite a good non academic qualification, I do a lot of extra curricular activities which all have given me the ability to be a good leader, communicator and empathise etc. and evidence of these skills. Also I have very good communication and interpersonal skills, my tutor has suggested I really emphasise this in my PS.

    to be honest, I never really had much interest in Birmingham or Cambridge. I think if UKCAT goes well I'm thinking: bristol, Edinburgh, peninsula, Leicester. If not then: bristol, Liverpool, cardiff, Edinburgh.

    many thanks!
    Quoting you in here just to keep the other thread on topic.

    I'm just going into 2nd year after the summer! I sympathise with how difficult it can be to find work experience, I had relatively little when applying myself!

    This is what Edinburgh say wrt to the non-academic side of things:
    The non-academic score is based on the confidential reference and on the applicant's statement. The
    non-academic qualities score is based on judgements of (a) personal qualities (b) career exploration
    (experience & understanding of medicine) and (c) achievement in non-academic activities.
    Career exploration is valued, less as a qualification, but more as evidence that the applicant has been
    exposed to either working with disadvantaged, diseased or disabled people (work experience) or
    observing the realities of medical practice (work shadowing). A small number of potential applicants may
    undertake such experience, find that they do not like it and choose another career. Thus the application
    may be informed (rather than naive). Not all applicants have ready access to work shadowing which may
    be precluded by confidentiality or lack of suitable contacts through school or family (most commonly those
    from socially and educationally disadvantaged backgrounds).
    Non-academic achievement provides evidence that applicants can successfully integrate academic
    achievement with other aspects of their personal lives. Fulfilment of extra-curricular activities, especially
    those with a leadership role or at a high level of achievement, demonstrates commitment and
    organisation and may predict ability to cope with the rigors of medical life.
    And quite specifically from scoring:

    PERSONAL QUALITIES
     suitability for medical practice
     interpersonal relationships & skills
     verbal and written communication skills
    CAREER EXPLORATION
     application informed or naïve?
     understanding of the nature of medical education & practice through reading & discussion
     experience of working with diseased, disadvantaged or disabled people through work experience prior
    to application
    NON-ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
     broad range of interests and achievements for example in music, arts or sports
     achievements at local, national or international level
     evidence of leadership abilities & organisational skills & evidence of social responsibility.
    With regards to UKCAT, Edinburgh currently use a quartile ranking system, where applicants get between 0 (bottom quartile) and 3 points (top quartile), which make up 3/37 points in the application (8%). However, the weighting's being upped to 16% (edit: information has since been released reporting that this has been upped to, in fact, 20%!) if my insider info's correct, and I don't have any further information than that, so I don't know if they're doubling the points given in each quartile to further differentiate, or if they'd be using octiles instead. We have to wait and see what more information they release in time!
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    Hi, future fellow medics.:hello: Just thought I'd dropped by and hi. I hope everyone has heard about the new changes for the 2013-14 application cycle. If you haven't, well have a quick read here.
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    (Original post by Medic 2014)
    Hi, future fellow medics.:hello: Just thought I'd dropped by and hi. I hope everyone has heard about the new changes for the 2013-14 application cycle. If you haven't, well have a quick read here.
    That is fantastic. I hadn't seen that, thank you!
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    http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departme...ng/2014changes

    Just thought people might like to know about this. UKCAT will now have a 20% weighting, up from 8%. Non academic (which now includes SJT) is 30%, and academic at 50%.

    Any thoughts?
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    (Original post by Herisson)
    http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departme...ng/2014changes

    Just thought people might like to know about this. UKCAT will now have a 20% weighting, up from 8%. Non academic (which now includes SJT) is 30%, and academic at 50%.

    Any thoughts?
    I'm thinking of applying to Edinburgh this year, so thanks for the update! Are they still allocating the UKCAT scores into quartiles or will they be doing octiles?
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    I think they're still using quartiles. Which is a shame for me, but oh well
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    (Original post by Herisson)
    http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departme...ng/2014changes

    Just thought people might like to know about this. UKCAT will now have a 20% weighting, up from 8%. Non academic (which now includes SJT) is 30%, and academic at 50%.

    Any thoughts?
    Quite a big jump. Academic weighting up 8%, UKCAT weighting up 12% to 20% (they were talking about increasing it to 16% a few months ago - I wonder what made them go for the larger weighting). Non-academic down 20%, probably because they were unhappy with how heavily selection relied on the personal statement and reference. I'm going to see if I can squeeze some information out of admissions or any of the med-ed lads when I go back.

    I'm surprised Edinburgh have chosen to take such a traditional focus on admissions, I wouldn't be at all surprised if they started interviewing by the time I graduate!

    (Original post by Lanah95)
    I'm thinking of applying to Edinburgh this year, so thanks for the update! Are they still allocating the UKCAT scores into quartiles or will they be doing octiles?
    They're still using quartiles, it sounds like they're just giving out more "points", probably to better differentiate based on the UKCAT. An updated selectors' handbook should be released soon, so we'll be able to get more information when that's released (probably soon after application date!). I'm looking forward to hearing what they have to say about how they'll use SJT banding.
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    Quite a big jump. Academic weighting up 8%, UKCAT weighting up 12% to 20% (they were talking about increasing it to 16% a few months ago - I wonder what made them go for the larger weighting). Non-academic down 20%, probably because they were unhappy with how heavily selection relied on the personal statement and reference. I'm going to see if I can squeeze some information out of admissions or any of the med-ed lads when I go back.

    I'm surprised Edinburgh have chosen to take such a traditional focus on admissions, I wouldn't be at all surprised if they started interviewing by the time I graduate!



    They're still using quartiles, it sounds like they're just giving out more "points", probably to better differentiate based on the UKCAT. An updated selectors' handbook should be released soon, so we'll be able to get more information when that's released (probably soon after application date!). I'm looking forward to hearing what they have to say about how they'll use SJT banding.
    Oh cool. Thanks for the info!
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    (Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
    I'm just going into 2nd year after the summer!
    Hi, I was just wondering if anyone (or you as you have just done this and so have the best experience) knows the reliance Edinburgh has on the PBL method of teaching Medicine. It is something I'm thinking that I'm hoping to avoid but Edinburgh seems amazing in every other way and so...how much do they use over the years and what's it really like if anyone knows/has experience?

    I have no idea how to post/quote etc on here, so apologies in advance.

    Thanks :)
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    (Original post by lydiaruth)
    Hi, I was just wondering if anyone (or you as you have just done this and so have the best experience) knows the reliance Edinburgh has on the PBL method of teaching Medicine. It is something I'm thinking that I'm hoping to avoid but Edinburgh seems amazing in every other way and so...how much do they use over the years and what's it really like if anyone knows/has experience?

    I have no idea how to post/quote etc on here, so apologies in advance.

    Thanks
    You get 2 sessions of PBL a week - that's 3 hours (they rarely last the full time, though!) - in first and second year. From there PBL gets ditched (although there's chatter of putting it into 3rd year, too, but nothing confirmed). It's not used so much as a primary teaching method as it is a way of consolidating and supplementing your learning. Personally, I absolutely adored PBL. The first few years at Edinburgh have a systems-based focus on the basic sciences (subject-based in first semester), and PBL acts as a great way of giving what you learn a clinical context, since they're all based around cases that the associated clinicians have created.

    I loved PBL, personally. The discussion aspect of it all is great, and I much prefer self-directed learning than I do just learning from a lecture just because I think the latter is really inefficient - you get some really exciting, brilliant lecturers and theirs are always worth it, but HES lectures for example are just boring and bleh.

    PBL's dead simple! How a session goes:

    You all come in, sit down. The group consists of a group of students and a facilitator, who's there to help out if need be. You'll find as you first start out, they take a bit more of an active role in pushing you in the right direction. After a while, you're all awesome at it, so the facilitator just kind of sits back and lets you run with it and only steps in if need be, but basically, their role is to just push things along if you get stuck, or to guide you in the right direction if you're swerving off.
    You elect a chair, who'll lead the session, and a scribe, who writes all the stuff down on the whiteboard or flipchart.

    Yous then read through the case, they're usually a page or 2 long (your first proper one is like 5 pages long, though, and chocfull of medical jargon. Edinburgh take the "throw you in at the deep end" approach. ), and then you just talk about the case. You pick out the things you think are important or interesting, and talk about them, clarifying things or having a go at explaining them - this lets you know what stuff you already know, and what stuff you don't know. You go through the entire case doing this, and then at the end once you're done and exhausted things to talk about, you look at the things you feel like you should know, and come up with questions based on that: "how does X work; what do you do for Y; why is the patient Z" things like that. Except your questions will sound fancier than that eventually because you'll get used to medical jargon.

    You then go away, have a few days to do some research in textbooks, lecture slides, journals, Wikipedia, Google, whatever you want to use to answer your questions. It takes between 1-3 hours, usually, to do all the research depending on the case and the person.

    After that, you all go back to PBL sometime later that week, and basically go through your questions answering them. Feeding back what you found, explaining/asking for explanations of things that didn't make sense. Then after that, done! That's you done a PBL case! I like PBL. I enjoy the style of learning, think it's more efficient for me, and I find the discussions interesting and fun. Others just like to get given the information directly in a lecture, write it up, and not waste time talking about it. Different strokes for different folks; fortunately Edinburgh provides a lot of different strokes! Like I said, PBL's used as an adjunct, and it can be very valuable for some people, depending on how you use it!
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    I know the system is changing a lot this year, but oes Edinburgh information on what kind scores people required to be successful, or have they ever done so? I think I'd be fine for academics (12A*s & 2A's at GCSE; 4A's at AS-level) and UKCAT (810 average), but I'm a bit worried about the non-academic side of things. I guess the band 1 I got in the SJT will help a little, but I've got real writer's block with my PS at the moment and, although I've done a week's work experience with elderly mental health patients and volunteer regularly at my local hospice, I'm not sure this counts as "exposure to the disadvantaged", as Edinburgh puts it. I've also got no experience of working/volunteering with the disabled besides doing a sports programme for a day back in Y10, that was a collaboration between my school and a special school, and at a UCAS convention the Edinburgh representative was really emphasising the importance of it, which has got me worried. Sorry this is so long, but I'd really like to GP to Edinburgh, although I don't want it to be a wasted application either
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    (Original post by MrSupernova)
    I know the system is changing a lot this year, but oes Edinburgh information on what kind scores people required to be successful, or have they ever done so? I think I'd be fine for academics (12A*s & 2A's at GCSE; 4A's at AS-level) and UKCAT (810 average), but I'm a bit worried about the non-academic side of things. I guess the band 1 I got in the SJT will help a little, but I've got real writer's block with my PS at the moment and, although I've done a week's work experience with elderly mental health patients and volunteer regularly at my local hospice, I'm not sure this counts as "exposure to the disadvantaged", as Edinburgh puts it. I've also got no experience of working/volunteering with the disabled besides doing a sports programme for a day back in Y10, that was a collaboration between my school and a special school, and at a UCAS convention the Edinburgh representative was really emphasising the importance of it, which has got me worried. Sorry this is so long, but I'd really like to GP to Edinburgh, although I don't want it to be a wasted application either
    Edinburgh do release information on what sort of people are successful, but that only extends to academics. It doesn't extend to non-academics because Edinburgh aren't looking for you to meet a specific minimum or anything. It's just a subjective measurement of how the selector feels that you've fulfilled their criteria. And since they've changed everything around this year, we have absolutely no idea if they'll be using the same criteria as before, or how they'll use banding (you've got the best banding possible, though, so you don't have to worry about that. )
    I think your non-academic stuff is fine - it certainly wouldn't be a waste. Apply on, bud! I take it you were shadowing a psychiatrist for your W/E in mental health?

    Hey, count yourself lucky that 70% of the application is now made up of stuff you've excelled in.
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    I'm really interested in applying to Edinburgh
    GCSE's: 10 A*s 1A
    A Levels: A*A*A (may go up to 3 after a remark)
    I'm doing my UKCAT tomorrow. I'm praying it will be a 700+ average.
    The only thing that really worries me about Edinburgh is their policy on AS resits. I actually only needed to resit one AS module to get the grades i got, but i ended up resitting more than two to be on the safe side. Does this automatically rule me out?

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