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Difference between BA and Bsc?

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    What are the major differences? Basically im looking for a business IT course through clearing, and some come up as giving you a Bsc by the end of it and some award you with a BA. Is this some kind of difficulty rating, or is it virtually the same?
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    Not sure to be honest...Maybe it's just how they classify it?
    Maybe one has more science aspects than the other?
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    One is more science based and the other more art based.
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    Ones more essay-ie, and the other is more mathy.
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    Well it's basically what it tells you BSc = bachelor of science, BA bachelor of arts.
    There are differences, but they are both to the same level. what do you want to do after you get your degree? Maybe some prospective employers would prefer one degree type to the other.
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    What they call the degree. If the university feels something to be a science, it's a BSc, if it feels it to be an art, a BA. Sometimes the BA will involve more humanities bits, but that's not a given, unless there are two options at the same university.
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    with the bovine beast on this

    generally you'd expeect a BSc course to be more numerate , but not necessarily so - some of it depends on the uni
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    Ill put it this way, Study English or history, you will be working towards a BA or MA, study engineering and you will ve working your way towards a bsc or msc
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    Just depends what the uni gives, Cambridge for example only gives BAs
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    Imagine getting a D.sc
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    (Original post by *titanium*)
    Imagine getting a D.sc
    The head of our department has one of those. As well as a normal degree, medical degree, and loads of other degrees lol. He must have spent his life in education!
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    (Original post by *titanium*)
    Ill put it this way, Study English or history, you will be working towards a BA or MA, study engineering and you will ve working your way towards a bsc or msc
    Not true, as for an engineering degree you'll usually be awarded and MEng or a BEng qualification.
    A BA means a bachelor of Arts degree, a BSC means a bachelor of science degree and a BEng means a bachelor of engineering degree.
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    (Original post by tin-top fan)
    Not true, as for an engineering degree you'll usually be awarded and MEng or a BEng qualification.
    A BA means a bachelor of Arts degree, a BSC means a bachelor of science degree and a BEng means a bachelor of engineering degree.
    Ok i should have known better, i am starting an Meng course in mechanical engineering in under 5 weeks time, but to me msc is the same as Meng.
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    (Original post by nikk)
    The head of our department has one of those. As well as a normal degree, medical degree, and loads of other degrees lol. He must have spent his life in education!
    A DSc is not like many other degrees (Such as undergrad or PhD). In europe it is a "higher doctorate" and is usually awarded to individuals that have significant scholarly research experience (i.e. academics of about 10 years standing or so - 40 years old say) they submit their publications to the university and it can then award them with the degree - very few people bother with it nowadays. Back in the day the degree was actually considered more prestigious than a professorial chair, but the introduction of the PhD in the twentieth century has devalued the degree and most people don't really understand what it is really for anymore.

    In the states it is just the equivalent of the PhD however.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    A DSc is not like many other degrees (Such as undergrad or PhD). In europe it is a "higher doctorate" and is usually awarded to individuals that have significant scholarly research experience (i.e. academics of about 10 years standing or so - 40 years old say) they submit their publications to the university and it can then award them with the degree - very few people bother with it nowadays. Back in the day the degree was actually considered more prestigious than a professorial chair, but the introduction of the PhD in the twentieth century has devalued the degree and most people don't really understand what it is really for anymore.

    In the states it is just the equivalent of the PhD however.
    Straight off of wiki
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    (Original post by *titanium*)
    Straight off of wiki
    Most people don't bother wikiing anyway. However I did know most of that stuff about the degree in europe.
Updated: August 30, 2006
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