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Indians in Ireland

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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    .I have emmigrated to England,and sacrificed the relaxed & atmosphere & friendliness of the west of Ireland for the greater oppertunities in England,which I think is the choice most young Irish migrating to the UK make..:suitc:
    its what i did - and as much as i love brum - man i miss the "ole sod" at times, nothing to do but fish by loch rea and you wouldnt hear a car the whole day (maybe the odd tractor)

    oh man im wistful now
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    (Original post by silverbolt)
    its what i did - and as much as i love brum - man i miss the "ole sod" at times, nothing to do but fish by loch rea and you wouldnt hear a car the whole day (maybe the odd tractor)

    oh man im wistful now
    Loughrea? wow..most of my family live there! Yeah I moved to London,and have been to almost every city in the UK ,maybe it's just me ,but I felt a 'coldness' about the other cities,bar London,maybe it had something to with the fact when I visited them I was on a train at 4:00am travelling from Leicester to London ,making stops at unappealling places such as 'nuneaton' and the like.
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    Well my Indian friend went to Dublin on a uni trip and said that people were shouting racist comments at her from across the street
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    Well, that's certainly not the norm by any means.
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    (Original post by Cherry Kisses)
    Well my Indian friend went to Dublin on a uni trip and said that people were shouting racist comments at her from across the street
    My uncle went to New York a few years ago and said planes were flying into buildings.
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    (Original post by svdesi)
    Are there many Indians in Ireland? Do you know if it's a good place or not for minorities?
    it is pretty monocultural.
    y9ou would be happpier in usa or canada or england if you are a desi.
    ireland is so monocultural that they dont realise that they are being racialy offensive even when they are being reallly reallly racist.
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    (Original post by Cherry Kisses)
    Well my Indian friend went to Dublin on a uni trip and said that people were shouting racist comments at her from across the street
    not surprised.
    ireland is not very welcoming of colored people, blacks and minorirites sicne irish are a mionority everywhere. so tehy get their own back in theuir cournty,

    plus because so many are poor and uneducateed, they are often resentfull of colored peoples who take their jobs awaaay.
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    Bit of a generalization.

    Very ignorant last comment as well.
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    True though. We see it a lot in the rest of the UK.

    And OP, if your first thought when thinking about moving to a new country is how many of 'your own' there are, don't bother. Surely moving to a new country means to 'experience' the different culture, language, race - for all the positives and negatives that involves?
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Probably not. They're both in the EU so you can freely travel between them without having to worry about visas or anything like that.
    For UK and ROI nationals there is no passport requirement, let alone a visa. But if the OP is an Indian national then I'm not so sure.

    Outside of Dublin, Ireland is almost 100% white.

    Marcus
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    (Original post by soggylettuce)
    not surprised.
    ireland is not very welcoming of colored people, blacks and minorirites sicne irish are a mionority everywhere. so tehy get their own back in theuir cournty,

    plus because so many are poor and uneducateed, they are often resentfull of colored peoples who take their jobs awaaay.
    That is not true. Maybe about 20 yrs ago,but now Ireland is full of different nationalities and the people here definetely don't discriminate,they barely take any notice,unless they are blatently taking somewhere over i.e taking our jobs etc.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)

    Outside of Dublin, Ireland is almost 100% white.

    Marcus
    Have you been to galway/Ireland:confused:

    Yes you need a passport travelling between the UK & Ireland.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    Yes you need a passport travelling between the UK & Ireland.
    Depends how you are travelling between them. I think you do if you fly, but then again I think you need a passport for internal UK flights these days on most airlines. There's no need for a passport if you cross the border from NI.

    Isn't there an agreement between all EU countries that means you don't need a passport to travel between them? Or is the UK not included in that? I'm pretty sure there's a similar agreement between the UK and Ireland though.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Depends how you are travelling between them. I think you do if you fly, but then again I think you need a passport for internal UK flights these days on most airlines. There's no need for a passport if you cross the border from NI.

    Isn't there an agreement between all EU countries that means you don't need a passport to travel between them? Or is the UK not included in that? I'm pretty sure there's a similar agreement between the UK and Ireland though.

    You need a passport travelling between the UK and Ireland by air,and also if your travelling by boat you need your passport to go through immigration checks in Wales. If travelling From London-to Belfast by Boat,you also need your passport to go through security checks in Scotland.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    Have you been to galway/Ireland:confused:

    Yes you need a passport travelling between the UK & Ireland.
    I am Irish. If you are a national of the UK or ROI you do not need a passport. The only time you will is if it is a (relatively recent) photo ID requirement of the airlines. I have travelled between the UK and Ireland many times, by sea and by air and have not needed a passport, I only got one 5 years ago.

    When the island of Ireland was partitioned into the state of Ireland and NI, it was written into the constitution that passports would not be required. There would never have been agreement between Republicans and Unionists if a passport was required to cross the border where some people still had families, but no passport was required before.

    When I go and visit my family in Ireland, I provide a passport as photo ID when I fly. I could just as easily provide a driving licence that would have the same purpose. Sometimes we drive from Leitrim across the border to NI. If passports were required, there would be a border crossing and passport checkpoint.

    Marcus
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    I am Irish. If you are a national of the UK or ROI you do not need a passport. The only time you will is if it is a (relatively recent) photo ID requirement of the airlines. I have travelled between the UK and Ireland many times, by sea and by air and have not needed a passport, I only got one 5 years ago.

    When the island of Ireland was partitioned into the state of Ireland and NI, it was written into the constitution that passports would not be required. There would never have been agreement between Republicans and Unionists if a passport was required to cross the border where some people still had families, but no passport was required before.

    When I go and visit my family in Ireland, I provide a passport as photo ID when I fly. I could just as easily provide a driving licence that would have the same purpose. Sometimes we drive from Leitrim across the border to NI. If passports were required, there would be a border crossing and passport checkpoint.

    Marcus
    You're Irish & you think that outside Dublin 100% of Irish are white:confused:

    Whatever about the constitution you definetely need a passport when going to the UK by boat ,you must go through migration once you reach wales,especially if you are a foreign national,unless you would like to be held by security officers in Wales for 24 hours..
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    You're Irish & you think that outside Dublin 100% of Irish are white:confused:

    Whatever about the constitution you definetely need a passport when going to the UK by boat ,you must go through migration once you reach wales,especially if you are a foreign national,unless you would like to be held by security officers in Wales for 24 hours..
    That might be something imposed by the travel authorities rather than the government itself. I think some airlines insist on passports, even though as marcusfox points out it's not a legal requirement to have one to travel between the UK and Ireland.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    You're Irish & you think that outside Dublin 100% of Irish are white:confused:

    Whatever about the constitution you definetely need a passport when going to the UK by boat ,you must go through migration once you reach wales,especially if you are a foreign national,unless you would like to be held by security officers in Wales for 24 hours..
    I said "almost". And once again, you do not need a passport. I have travelled by boat more times than by plane. It is sufficient to just tell immigration that you are an Irish/UK national.

    Marcus
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    http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travelling-...y-requirements

    http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travelling-...uirements&pg=4

    http://foreignaffairs.gov.ie/home/index.aspx?id=253

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Travel_Area

    http://www.jstor.org/pss/1097196



    Marcus
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    Dublin is a hell of a lot more multicultural than it was 10 years ago.. There's a huge amount of Polish, Lithuanians, Latviand, Romanians, Nigerians..and Indians, though they're far from the biggest group. There are a good few people with the 'they tuk ar jarbs' attitide, but in general, Dublin is welcoming, although, when I visited London a few months ago, I noticed that London is a lot more integrated.

    As for passports, you now need a passport travelling between the UK and Ireland, I'm not sure about the ferries because I haven't taken one in years.

    As for working in Dublin, the economy is relatively strong, wages are high, there isn't a shortage of jobs if you have the qualifications. Inflation is pretty high at the moment, food prices are high, the sterling-euro conversion screws us all over even though the euro is gaining, and the housing market is a joke also, though it has gone down a bit in recent years.

    Public transport- effective system still in progress..

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