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Indians in Ireland

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    (Original post by Casserole)
    But how would someone foreign looking prove that he was a citizen of UK/ROI? Speak English? If that's the case, any foreigner who knows how to play the game can get on by.
    Indeed, I've always wondered this. No matter, the rules on the Common Travel area are quite explicit and are not down to interpretation - if you visit the Irish Embassy in London (which I have done several times to arrange passports for my family) there is a notice explaining it.

    From the website http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travelling-...uirements&pg=4

    "Ireland, along with the UK, is a member of the Common Travel Area. This means that British Citizens do not require a passport to visit Ireland. However, Irish immigration officers will check the IDs of all passengers arriving by air from the UK and most airlines will not carry passengers to and from Ireland unless they have seen satisfactory photographic ID before boarding. Travellers to Ireland are therefore encouraged to take their British passports with them."

    Marcus
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    I''ll give it a go this summer when I go round Europe. I'll stop by Ireland first, and not speak a word. If I get manhandled and interrogated, I'll do a blog and sue the buggers. Quids in!
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    (Original post by Casserole)
    But how would someone foreign looking prove that he was a citizen of UK/ROI? Speak English? If that's the case, any foreigner who knows how to play the game can get on by.
    Because they need valid ID. Valid ID does not necessarily have to be a passport.
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    In the past I have been able to walk through Irish immigration at Dublin/Rosslare ferryport just by saying "Irish citizen".

    Marcus
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    (Original post by Casserole)
    But how would someone foreign looking prove that he was a citizen of UK/ROI? Speak English? If that's the case, any foreigner who knows how to play the game can get on by.
    Exactly what I was trying to say. The ONLY way you can prove your nationality/citizenship is with a passport.ID aren't sufficient,which is why it is best to have a passport when travelling between the UK& Ireland,particularly on the boat,where migration officers will need proof of nationality,,particularly in the case of the OP. Illegal immigrants anyone?
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    In the past I have been able to walk through Irish immigration at Dublin/Rosslare ferryport just by saying "Irish citizen".

    Marcus

    This is when you reach Dublin,AFTER going through migration in Wales ,with your luggage and passport..
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    This is when you reach Dublin,AFTER going through migration in Wales ,with your luggage and passport..
    I have never been asked to show my passport while travelling by ferry. Most recently a couple of years ago.

    Marcus
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    Lucky you.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    Lucky you.
    Nothing to do with luck.

    Marcus
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    Exactly what I was trying to say. The ONLY way you can prove your nationality/citizenship is with a passport.ID aren't sufficient,which is why it is best to have a passport when travelling between the UK& Ireland,particularly on the boat,where migration officers will need proof of nationality,,particularly in the case of the OP. Illegal immigrants anyone?
    A valid EU driver's license would probably also be acceptable.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    Exactly what I was trying to say. The ONLY way you can prove your nationality/citizenship is with a passport.ID aren't sufficient,which is why it is best to have a passport when travelling between the UK& Ireland,particularly on the boat,where migration officers will need proof of nationality,,particularly in the case of the OP. Illegal immigrants anyone?
    Trust me, not many illegal immigrants are going to want to continue on to Ireland once they've got to the UK. The UK is a much softer touch on "asylum seekers" with regards to housing and benefits than Ireland is.

    Marcus
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    :topic:
    (Original post by marcusfox)
    Trust me, not many illegal immigrants are going to want to continue on to Ireland once they've got to the UK. The UK is a much softer touch on "asylum seekers" with regards to housing and benefits than Ireland is.

    Marcus
    :topic:
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    But if they do, there's nothing stopping them? Not much of a safeguard is it?

    I was thinking the UK and Ireland have some sort of database where, if you were stopped with no passport (since there is no legal obligation to carry one), they could just type your name and tada, you're not a dirty illegal.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    Because they need valid ID. Valid ID does not necessarily have to be a passport.
    which clearly means it has to be something that has your mug on it, all the necessary security crap AND your nationality. Hmmm, now what sort of documentation is best suited for that?

    Basically it's just a negligible improvement in convenience.
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    I'm not denying that a passport is probably going to be the most suitable form of ID. A UK driver's license and mostly likely an Irish one also have all the relevant information. Photo, name and address. I don't think nationality matters that much if you can prove you live in the UK or Ireland.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    :topic:
    :topic:
    Right, It's your argument, and when I rebut it, I'm off topic?

    Ideally we'd have no illegal immigrants coming to the UK. They're illegal, that's the point. If they're going to make the effort to sneak on a lorry in France or hang on to the bottom of a Eurostar, a little thing like a passport requirement for entry isn't going to stop them going to Ireland if they really wanted to. After all, it didn't stop then getting to the UK, did it? Billions is spent on policing illegal Channel crossings in an attempt to prevent this, because it's such a problem. The same is not spent policing the Irish Sea crossing. Now work out why this is so.

    Marcus
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    The issue was whether a passport is a requirement for the OP, who is of indian nationality, when travelling between the UK and Ireland. In which case a passport would be necessary ,unless the OP would prefer to have his journey suspended whilst he faces immigration/illegal occupancy officials.
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    (Original post by westofirelandgirl19)
    The issue was whether a passport is a requirement for the OP, who is of indian nationality, when travelling between the UK and Ireland. In which case a passport would be necessary ,unless the OP would prefer to have his journey suspended whilst he faces immigration/illegal occupancy officials.
    Yes. But you brought up the point of illegal immigration as an argument as to why we shouldn't have (or why you believe we don't have) a common travel area. So I provided the argument as to why the common travel area has very little effect on the issue of illegal immigration from UK to ROI. And he never said he was an Indian national. He could be a British National of ethnic Indian origin.

    Marcus
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    Yes and the answer to the OP's quistion is ,Yes he would need a passport while travelling ,unless,as I have already said,he would prefer to face immigration officials,especially being of ethnic origin,which is bound to raise some eyebrows especially if he does not hold a passport,and while Ireland/Englands immigration authority aren't perfect in regard to preventing the entry of illegal immigrants,they do at least make some effort .
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    If the OP is a British national, then the answer is no. Obviously it makes sense to carry his passport or other accepted form of ID when travelling for identification purposes, but the fact is, it's written in law and is the same for any British or Irish national whether they be white or ethnic minority Indian. Opinion as to nationality because of the colour of his skin is not relevant, and could be considered racial discrimination.

    Yes, I agree that this makes it difficult for a border control that requires passports and visas for everyone else, perhaps this is why it may soon change.

    Marcus

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