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Indians in Ireland

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    'Relegated' sorry what? Was it a Catholic school you went to? It's true that almost all primary schools require baptism certs and are Catholic but secondary schools are almost all non-denominational- in which case the only factors that could possibly exclude you from your choice of school would be gender and money. So no-one's relegated anything! My secondary school was non-denominatial and there were plenty of foreigners in each year.

    I will agree with you that there is a 'dey tuk ar jarbs' attitude in Ireland but you just tarred the whole nation there, which is grossly unfair. I myself find it extremely odd witnessing the really relatively recent influx of immigrants, Ireland is tradionally a coutry of emigration. Particularly Parnell Street, it's just weird. I think you need to appreciate Ireland's historic repressed Catholicism and even things like rural population distribution (MUCH lower than UK). I find that people are more accepting now of immigrants than they were though.
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    How can Ireland be expected to become a multi-cultural society in such a short period of time? As the person above said, immigration is a relative recent, and certainly comparatively recent - to the likes of the UK, cultural factor. Something so profound doesn't happen overnight, nor should it be expected to.

    The point about virtually all secondary schools in the country being non-denominational is just not true btw. As an aside to whoever made it lol.
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    (Original post by hmjav)
    The Irish are always whinging that the foreigners are stealing their jobs
    You'll find that attitude to some extent in any country with a large diaspora of foreign-born citizens, whether that diaspora is perceived or real. Go to France and it's the North Africans "stealing jobs". Here in Britain it's been wave after wave of migrants "stealing jobs", with the current target being Eastern Europeans. In America it's Mexicans who have been "stealing jobs".

    It's all a bit silly really - nobody is stealing jobs from anyone else, since if you never actually got the job in the first place, how can someone be stealing it from you?

    I fear that we'll see this kind of attitude across the world for some time to come. Frankly, it's very much a case of the media whipping the people up into a frenzy in Ireland, though. There are just 12,000 Nigerians in Ireland at the last count, and 96% of the Irish population was born in Ireland [a substantial portion of the last 2% were born in the UK & Northern Ireland] - so it's very much over-reaction from some scared Irish conservatives that has spread to the rest of the population amidst the recession. Other countries have more tangible causes to be concerned about immigration - the UK for example is already approaching it's current infrastructure limits in transportation and healthcare.
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    You'll find that attitude to some extent in any country with a large diaspora of foreign-born citizens, whether that diaspora is perceived or real. Go to France and it's the North Africans "stealing jobs". Here in Britain it's been wave after wave of migrants "stealing jobs", with the current target being Eastern Europeans. In America it's Mexicans who have been "stealing jobs".

    It's all a bit silly really - nobody is stealing jobs from anyone else, since if you never actually got the job in the first place, how can someone be stealing it from you?

    I fear that we'll see this kind of attitude across the world for some time to come. Frankly, it's very much a case of the media whipping the people up into a frenzy in Ireland, though. There are just 12,000 Nigerians in Ireland at the last count, and 96% of the Irish population was born in Ireland [a substantial portion of the last 2% were born in the UK & Northern Ireland] - so it's very much over-reaction from some scared Irish conservatives that has spread to the rest of the population amidst the recession. Other countries have more tangible causes to be concerned about immigration - the UK for example is already approaching it's current infrastructure limits in transportation and healthcare.
    Northern Irish born are considered native. so its a bit more than 2%
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    (Original post by Teofilo)
    The point about virtually all secondary schools in the country being non-denominational is just not true btw. As an aside to whoever made it lol.


    Yep, there are lots of former- convent schools (they get extra days off and all..) and most private schools would be but your average 'local' school, community schools and public schools ARE non-denominational and they make up a much greater proportion than other schools.
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    Hello Guyzz,
    I am Arjun Hunurkar, from Mumbai(India). I am looking to study master of Computer Science or Software Engineering like subjects in one of the Universities in Ireland. i serioulsy dont know much about Ireland, how the place is, people over there, how is the scope of job after completing my master. Obviou's i wud see to get job experience, live more.
    I need advices from the people who live over there or know much about this situation. Most probably i am looking for college University of Limerick, Griffith College Dublin, and Cork!
    GUyz i am hoping your kind feedback, i want to know more of it as a student. so plzz do me a favour and reply me.
    Thank you!

    I have another option as UK, i am getting Offer from Swansea University for Computing Science but the only problem is they have reduced all the international student visa till 4month after urr master is completed. so that's y i am planning to Ireland where 2yrs of visa and major IT companies also resides. you better you than me guyzz, help me plz plz plz. which one i chooose UK or Ireland and tell me why, ok!
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    (Original post by arjunhunurkar)
    Hello Guyzz,
    I am Arjun Hunurkar, from Mumbai(India). I am looking to study master of Computer Science or Software Engineering like subjects in one of the Universities in Ireland. i serioulsy dont know much about Ireland, how the place is, people over there, how is the scope of job after completing my master. Obviou's i wud see to get job experience, live more.
    I need advices from the people who live over there or know much about this situation. Most probably i am looking for college University of Limerick, Griffith College Dublin, and Cork!
    GUyz i am hoping your kind feedback, i want to know more of it as a student. so plzz do me a favour and reply me.
    Thank you!

    I have another option as UK, i am getting Offer from Swansea University for Computing Science but the only problem is they have reduced all the international student visa till 4month after urr master is completed. so that's y i am planning to Ireland where 2yrs of visa and major IT companies also resides. you better you than me guyzz, help me plz plz plz. which one i chooose UK or Ireland and tell me why, ok!

    Unemployment in Ireland has hit 14.5%. In the last 6 months 11 of my friends have gone to Australia, not counting the 5 or 6 others who went before. The job market is crap. HOWEVER, IT jobs continue to be available. As you said, there are several big companies here- HP, Intel, Google, Facebook, Paypal. I know a good few who have gotten jobs in this sector recently. IT and childcare are the only sectors hiring! So while in general the numbers on the dole rise every week and companies and shops are actually closing at a higher rate than ever- IT is still relatively. Anyway your qualifications will travel pretty well.

    There are seven universities here. Trinity College Dublin, www.tcd.ie University College Dublin, www.ucd.ie University College Cork, www.ucc.ie National University of Ireland Galway, www.nuigalway.ie University of Limerick, www.ul.ie Dublin City University www.dcu.ie and National University of Ireland Maynooth. www.nuim.ie They are ranked in that order, Trinity is quite a bit ahead of the rest. I really would not recommend Griffith College Dublin. It's a private college, which means they have a low calibre of student as they have very low grade requirements- they just want fees. The standard would be much higher at one of the universities, or at DIT- www.dit.ie which is soon to become a university and is big into information technology etc. Have a look at the postgrad courses on the websites and see. There should be an email address to contact under international students if you have any questions.

    I'm not sure how aware you are of how Ireland is split? Ireland was controlled by the UK and was actually part of it for slightly more than 100 years (controlled for centuries longer than that). This is different to India, Ireland was part of the UK itself, not a colony or part of the commonwealth. There were numerous attempts at independence, which succeeded in the early 1920's. However, there was a sizeable population in the North of the country who wanted to remain as part of Britain. They were also Protestant, as opposed to the vast majority of the rest of the country, who were Catholic. This came about as a result of plantation of British settlers in the North centuries before. Anyway, 6 counties (out of 32) remain in the United Kingdom. 26 form the Republic of Ireland. 'Ireland' refers to the Republic as a rule, 'The North' refers to Northern Ireland. Terms like Southern Ireland and Éire which is the Irish for Ireland also mean the Republic. There is a lot of difference between the two- different currency, flag, economy, education system, tax system...etc.

    Ireland is traditonally a country of emigration. It suffered a huge famine in the 1840's when the countries around it were industrialising and going away from agriculture and into industry and infrastructure. Ireland was the opposite, it was devastated and extremely poor. The gaining of independence did little to drag it into the 21st century. The 1920's, 1950's and 1980's (and right now as well) were and are decades of emigration, but it is consistent right the way through except for the 1990's. The 1990's up until 2005 were an economic miracle. It took place so late because of Ireland's lack of development right up until the 1970's when it joined the EU. However because it was so dramatic it has made the suffering of the recession that much worse, not least because it was propped up by a property boom that was always going to crash sometime, and extremely corrupt banks and government ministers.

    Only recently has it emerged from a repressed Catholic state. Right up until the 1970's (peak time being the 1950's) unmarried pregnant girls were thrown out of their homes and dumped in launderettes run by nuns where they were forced to work extremely hard only to have their babies forcibly taken from them and adopted in the end. Ireland was run by the Church, essentially. It ruthlessly squashed any 'state' interference, such as the idea of free healthcare for pregnant women and children. Contraception was only made legal in the 1990's. Homosexuality was decriminalised in and around the year 2000 I think. This is extremely late for a Western country. Abuse was rife in a lot of orphanages and schools were wild children were sent- industrial schools.

    Ireland has only become multicultural really since about 2000. In my own lifetime- I am 23. So you can appreciate that for the older generations, it is harder for them to adjust to. In particular there is a huge amount of Polish people- the UK has less of them than we do, but far more Indians. It has shook off the interference of the Church. It has a President and a Prime Minister who is called the Taoiseach, which is the Irish word for it.

    It is a beautiful country. Very very unspoiled, with a very low population density. Dublin is the capital and has only a million people in the city and immediate surrounds. The other cities are far smaller. There is no air pollution and it is not congested. In fact there are no sky-scrapers or high buildings. If you go to www.discoverireland.ie it should give you an idea of what the countryside looks like. The West, in particular Galway are the nicest, and the Southwest, West Cork and Kerry.

    It has a pretty troubled history, and a deep and rich mythology. The national language suffered a death-blow under English rule and is still marginalised. It is spoken only in some parts of the West, North-West and South-West. However it is not dead and buried. nor are other aspects of culture like Irish music, storytelling and Irish dancing. There IS a binge drinking culture, which is really not helped by strict alcohol laws, but it's definitely not the case that every Irish person is drunk etc. etc. stereotype. It is really extremely friendly though. Cities, towns..wherever. Great atmosphere to be had.
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    surely the indians are not colonising ireland now?

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Updated: April 6, 2012
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