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    Jayk, I will certainly give that a look through when I get the time. Since it's half term, you might be lucky...

    Some people say that fantasy / sci-fi etc. cannot be written the same as "real world" things, because you don't have any proper experiences in those situations, so cannot possibly relate them in your book to your reader decently. I completely disagree. Fantasy allows you to go places where you would otherwise never be able to go. It's all about your imagination! You have no limits and can do anything, and let anything happen!
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    I'm also a die-hard fantasy fan. I completely disagree with people who sneer at fantasy because it's "much easier to write because you can just make up the rules." Having to make up the rules makes it harder to write, because you have to communicate the laws of the universe to the reader and stick to them, or else it's cheating. There's nothing worse than a hero getting out of a situation because of some power he suddenly discovers, that the author conveniently forgot to mention previously. That's just cheating.

    On the other hand, that means it's probably easier to write bad fantasy than it is to write any other genre. (Except possibly bad romance...) Good fantasy's another matter. :p:

    I agree, Sir Esh - fantasy may be set in the realm of the unfamiliar with different countries, customs and creatures, but ultimately it's still about people, and the people in fantasy and sci-fi (whether they be humans, elves, dwarves or Hooloovoos) still have to react realistically. One of my favourite bits of writing fantasy is the abundance of 'What-if?' scenarios... Politics is a particular favourite of mine, you can have so many prejudices and systems and clashes... :cool:

    ... *is so sad* :p:
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    Jayk, I will certainly give that a look through when I get the time. Since it's half term, you might be lucky...

    Some people say that fantasy / sci-fi etc. cannot be written the same as "real world" things, because you don't have any proper experiences in those situations, so cannot possibly relate them in your book to your reader decently. I completely disagree. Fantasy allows you to go places where you would otherwise never be able to go. It's all about your imagination! You have no limits and can do anything, and let anything happen!
    So true. When I was doing my GCSE English Lang and Lit and there was the creative writing part of it for stories etc, our teachers always advised us against fantasy because they said that you get vague and go all over the place because you can't compare it to anything real. I disagreed then and I disagree now. Luckily though I am an exception to that rule.
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    (Original post by hyper-little-mushroom-men)
    I'm also a die-hard fantasy fan. I completely disagree with people who sneer at fantasy because it's "much easier to write because you can just make up the rules." Having to make up the rules makes it harder to write, because you have to communicate the laws of the universe to the reader and stick to them, or else it's cheating. There's nothing worse than a hero getting out of a situation because of some power he suddenly discovers, that the author conveniently forgot to mention previously. That's just cheating.

    On the other hand, that means it's probably easier to write bad fantasy than it is to write any other genre. (Except possibly bad romance...) Good fantasy's another matter. :p:

    I agree, Sir Esh - fantasy may be set in the realm of the unfamiliar with different countries, customs and creatures, but ultimately it's still about people, and the people in fantasy and sci-fi (whether they be humans, elves, dwarves or Hooloovoos) still have to react realistically. One of my favourite bits of writing fantasy is the abundance of 'What-if?' scenarios... Politics is a particular favourite of mine, you can have so many prejudices and systems and clashes... :cool:

    ... *is so sad* :p:
    That's good. So true.
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    Jayk, I will certainly give that a look through when I get the time. Since it's half term, you might be lucky...

    Some people say that fantasy / sci-fi etc. cannot be written the same as "real world" things, because you don't have any proper experiences in those situations, so cannot possibly relate them in your book to your reader decently. I completely disagree. Fantasy allows you to go places where you would otherwise never be able to go. It's all about your imagination! You have no limits and can do anything, and let anything happen!
    Thanks for adding me to the society and for the welcome rep.:hugs:
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    :wavey:

    Can I join, I would love to be a script writer
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    Sounds like a good idea, and I was shocked to find out that there is none at the moment! :eek:

    However, that is something that I wish to remedy quickly enough. Would anyone else be interested in joining such a society? The aim would be to talk about the things that you wrote / are currently writing / plan to write, give advice, help and support each other, give tips, encourage people to get their work published, and how best to go about it, and all that sort of thing. All while having good fun! What more could you want!?

    If you are at all interested, please post and say so, so that we can get this society up and running!

    (If you feel that this society is a complete waste of time, you are, of course, welcome to say that too )

    I figured this would be the best place to have the thread for the moment, as most people potentially interested would browse around here...

    ~ Sir Esh
    :eek: You have a novel published? Congrats, how did you go about it after writing?
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    np, Elements And I know exactly what you mean about the creative writing! The same thing repeated itself when it came to the creative part of the Film Studies last year (although in that case, our teacher was mainly referring to people wanting to write Scarface-esque scripts, in which they had absolutely no experience, but simply liked to watch)

    Hyper - yes, in fantasy it is very easy to write rubbish. You simply copy all the ideas that other people have had, follow stereotypical plots (The Hero's Journey being the most popular, I suppose), have stereotypical figures (The Orphaned Hero-to-be-Child / The Mentor / The (evil and/or unknown of)Relative etc. etc.). It's surprisingly difficult to write something new. Then again, people don't always want something new in fantasy. They want the same formula again and again a lot of the time. I don't think that there's as much opportunity for literary scope in fantasy as in other genres. It's not so much the writing that keeps the reader going, rather the characters, the plot, the adventure, the mystery etc. I think Deus ex machina is the technical word you're looking for or, as my English / Film studies teacher / tutor put it: "A rubbish ending that shows that the writer is incapable" :P:
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    ooo can I join this society? even though this may be late, and I'm behind with all the news!

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    I'm in (please?)
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    I don't think that there's as much opportunity for literary scope in fantasy as in other genres. It's not so much the writing that keeps the reader going, rather the characters, the plot, the adventure, the mystery etc. I think Deus ex machina is the technical word you're looking for or, as my English / Film studies teacher / tutor put it: "A rubbish ending that shows that the writer is incapable" :P:
    Haha, that's the term! In fantasy more than any other genre it can be almost literally 'god in the machine'... Ooh, shiny all-powerful amulet/random heit to the thromne/the cavalry suddenly appears! :rolleyes:

    I see what you mean about lack of scope though; much of fantasy's appeal is, I think, built on certain archetypes and formulae (that's not to say stereotypes...); it's part of the escapism thing, I think. You don't see many serious fantasy novels with a sympathetic protagonist who's a snivelling coward, because we read fantasy to read about heros, as it were, albeit heros with flaws.

    Feel free to prove me wrong on that example. :p: (I say 'serious' to discount Rincewind. )
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    Jayk, I will certainly give that a look through when I get the time. Since it's half term, you might be lucky...
    Thanks! And if it sucks...TELL ME!!!
    (Original post by hyper-little-mushroom-men)
    I'm also a die-hard fantasy fan. I completely disagree with people who sneer at fantasy because it's "much easier to write because you can just make up the rules." Having to make up the rules makes it harder to write, because you have to communicate the laws of the universe to the reader and stick to them, or else it's cheating. There's nothing worse than a hero getting out of a situation because of some power he suddenly discovers, that the author conveniently forgot to mention previously. That's just cheating.
    Totally agree! I hate it when people say 'OMG, it's just stoopid' (as many of my peers at my school used to say...the ****ers ), because it's not! Fantasy is actually an incredibly intelligent vein of story-telling, and not enough people appreciate that fact. :mad:
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    (Original post by Josiette)
    :wavey:

    Can I join, I would love to be a script writer
    I think this is the link you'll be looking for, in that case. Just scroll down to the "Writers' Society", then click "Join this Soc"

    (Original post by Josiette)
    :eek: You have a novel published? Congrats, how did you go about it after writing?
    Thank you Well, it's not actually physically published yet - i.e. you can't buy one in the bookstores. You can over amazon and our publisher, though. I wrote it with my twin brother since the age of 11 (so we've been working on it for the past 6/7 years now).

    Hm, I can see that I'll be asked about the novel a lot, so I should have a post that I can refer people to when asked :p: Or you could check out our website here. It has pretty much all the info on it, plus some extras. I should type up a post with enough info in it some time.

    As for the question of what we did after we wrote it. . .
    We sent it to some publishers after about a year of writing, when we finished the first draft. We kept on working on it, though, even though it got turned down by numerous publishers and agents. We kept on re-writing, and re-sending, and got constantly improving feedback and comments by the publishers/agents. About two years ago, we thought it was much better, so sent it to off again. By this stage we had matured sufficiently to know how good a novel needed to be, and our characters, the plot, our style of writing, and pretty much everything had improved to a stage where we were happy for it to be released. The parties we sent it to gave some feedback, but weren't willing to take it on, although they did say that our writing was 'better than most of the stuff we get. Considering your age, that is even more impressive!". They helped us a lot, though. By this time, my brother had become a full time writer (he left school and did a few o-levels so that he had 'formal qualifications'), and knew a lot about what to do regarding sending off the MSS (manuscript), sample chapters, cover letters etc, so that our dealings were very professional. We got into talks with an American publisher, but ended up not going with them. But we then started talks with our current U.K. publisher, who really liked the book, and we started talking seriously about the contracts. At the same time, our current Indian publisher was approached, and they thought it amazing. They also gave it to a test-reader who had no info on it at all, and the feedback they got from them was very positive. So we ended up with these two publishers, after a lot of careful discussions, and many versions of contracts.


    Actually, if anyone is interested in getting their words published, then make sure you get some advice! This was stressed to us in various places at different times, and we made sure that we knew as much as possible about the details of publishing. Writing the book is only half the work, you know. If you want to get a decent deal out of it, then you need to sell your book in the rigt way as well! If, on the other hand, you only want it published, and aren't too bothered about the financial returns, that you may be willing to not put in all the tiring effort, and let the publisher / agent have it for not very much. It depends what your situation is. Most writers are short of money, so need to haggle the best deals they can out of agents and publishers
    I would suggest doing a good google (or whichever search-engine you prefer. www.goodtree.com is a apparently a charity-type search engine, which is an amalgamation of the main search engine companies. Helps a good cause if you look about there ) to find some information about the publishers you'll be looking at for your genre. (i.e. we didn't exactly want to send our fantasy novel off to the Vintage Books imprint of a publishing house ) Find out which publishers are likely to accept you, or which ones you would like to accept you. Then do some research on them. They will generally tell you on their website if they want the prologue and first 3 chapters, or the first x-hundred words, or a synopsis or whatever it may be. Or you can of course ring them up and ask them, or send them an e-mail. Don't be afraid to do this! It often saves a lot of hassle. Also, there are few things more annoying to publishers than someone submitting something that does not follow the guidlines which they express. Make sure that your publisher is happy for you to e-mail it to them, and if not, then send a hard copy. Your e-mail will at best get glanced at then deleted, and most likely won't even get past their heavy filtering system. If you do send an e-mail, also check if they like it as part of the e-mail, or as an attachment, and in which format (.doc, .pdf, etc.).
    Remember that you will get turned down. And again. And again and again and again. If not - great! Congratulations! If, however, you do, then don't worry. don't get worked up saying 'they didn't even look at the whole thing! How can they only decide on the merit of a few pages! This is so unfair!'. It is unfair, but they receive mountains of stuff each day, and cannot afford to look through an entire MSS. Simply keep on trying. Remeber that even JRRTolkien and JKRowling got turned down by most of the publishers before being accepted! If you keep on sending off your script, then you will get an answer at some stage. The general procedure is for you to send to the publisher e.g. the first 3 chapters. They will then dump it in a pile. Your precious MSS will stay there for a long time, while you are anxiously biting your fingernails, wondering what is happening to it. After a few days/weeks/perhaps even month someone will pick it up and flick through it. If they don't like it, they'll bin it. You may at this stage get a letter saying "thank you, [bla bla bla] but we're sorry that we can't find a place for this in our publishing schedule at the moment". If, however, they do like it, they will request the full MSS from you. Then you have to once more wait for a month, or few weeks at the least. (times may vary hugely depending on who you send it to. If it is a small, individually owned agency, for example, your MSS might get read within a couple of weeks. If you send it to a publishing giant such as Random House, it will probably take a considerable amount longer, simply because they receive so much more!) They will then send you a letter, saying either that they regret that they can't see it fitting in, or that they would like to discuss things further. If the latter is the case; congratulations! But you are still far from published. You need to negotiate the terms of the contract(s), publication date, the front cover design, extras (such as a map, or glossary, or 'on the author' etc.) font size, dimensions of the book, indents, promotional pictures, promotional activities. . . Although you will only have control over these if it explicitly says so in your contract. If you sign a simple contract, which fails to mention these things, you may find that it is all out of your hands, and you may end up looking at the hardcopy of your book, thinking that the front page is awful! Or you could inform yourself about contracts, then show the publisher that they're dealing with someone who knows their stuff, and make sure you have some control over that side of things. Once the contract is out of the way, you still need to do all the editing / do the adjustments the editor from the publisher suggests you do.

    As you can see, it is a lot of hard work. I am by no means an expert! I've only been lucky enough to experience this first hand, but I'm sure that there are plent of people on TSR that are more knowledgeable than I on such matters.
    The above help is also only what we experienced. I.e. without an agent or an editor going through it first. It is generally recommended that you get a decent literary agent before a publisher, because they will look at the contract for you, and get you a far better deal than you are likely to get. They do take a certain %age off what you get, but you will probably end up with more than if you had missed out the agent, so it is worth it.
    Your book is also likely to benefit hugely from a good editor. Now, editors can be nasty people, as far as you, the author is concerned. Firstly, you pay them. Before you are even guaranteed that you will sell your book. (Well, unless you happen to have some very good connections, and know some very kind editors! That is something most of us don't, however ) Secondly, they rip your book apart without any seeming care for your creation. It is often hard for an author to see their MSS changed about so much, and sentences that you thought the world of seemingly destroyed beyond repair. But remember that the editor will know what they're doing. (hopefully - get as much info on the editor as possible beforehand, so that you're sure it's someone who knows the genre, and what people want to read) I've seen that a lot of authors say that "Every book benefits greatly from a good editor going through it". If nothing else, they will pick up inconsistencies and other small flaws that you failed to see.
    For agents - follow similarly as with publishers. Only that once you've got an agent, they will take care of the headache of finding a publisher, and getting you a good deal, and a say in the cover art etc. etc.


    Well, I sure did not intend to write that much! (That sounds horribly american, doesn't it?) But if anyone can be bothered to look through that, I'm sure it'll be helpful. Remeber, though, that it's not expert advise - just some tips that I would give. Wow, that really is a lot that I wrote there! Perhaps I should save it to post again some time, or improve on it, and place it somewhere were more people can benefit from it :rolleyes: Josiette, you prompted the longest post out of me that I have ever made on TSR, I do believe!
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    I think this is the link you'll be looking for, in that case. Just scroll down to the "Writers' Society", then click "Join this Soc"


    Thank you Well, it's not actually physically published yet - i.e. you can't buy one in the bookstores. You can over amazon and our publisher, though. I wrote it with my twin brother since the age of 11 (so we've been working on it for the past 6/7 years now).

    Hm, I can see that I'll be asked about the novel a lot, so I should have a post that I can refer people to when asked :p: Or you could check out our website here. It has pretty much all the info on it, plus some extras. I should type up a post with enough info in it some time.

    As for the question of what we did after we wrote it. . .
    We sent it to some publishers after about a year of writing, when we finished the first draft. We kept on working on it, though, even though it got turned down by numerous publishers and agents. We kept on re-writing, and re-sending, and got constantly improving feedback and comments by the publishers/agents. About two years ago, we thought it was much better, so sent it to off again. By this stage we had matured sufficiently to know how good a novel needed to be, and our characters, the plot, our style of writing, and pretty much everything had improved to a stage where we were happy for it to be released. The parties we sent it to gave some feedback, but weren't willing to take it on, although they did say that our writing was 'better than most of the stuff we get. Considering your age, that is even more impressive!". They helped us a lot, though. By this time, my brother had become a full time writer (he left school and did a few o-levels so that he had 'formal qualifications'), and knew a lot about what to do regarding sending off the MSS (manuscript), sample chapters, cover letters etc, so that our dealings were very professional. We got into talks with an American publisher, but ended up not going with them. But we then started talks with our current U.K. publisher, who really liked the book, and we started talking seriously about the contracts. At the same time, our current Indian publisher was approached, and they thought it amazing. They also gave it to a test-reader who had no info on it at all, and the feedback they got from them was very positive. So we ended up with these two publishers, after a lot of careful discussions, and many versions of contracts.


    Actually, if anyone is interested in getting their words published, then make sure you get some advice! This was stressed to us in various places at different times, and we made sure that we knew as much as possible about the details of publishing. Writing the book is only half the work, you know. If you want to get a decent deal out of it, then you need to sell your book in the rigt way as well! If, on the other hand, you only want it published, and aren't too bothered about the financial returns, that you may be willing to not put in all the tiring effort, and let the publisher / agent have it for not very much. It depends what your situation is. Most writers are short of money, so need to haggle the best deals they can out of agents and publishers
    I would suggest doing a good google (or whichever search-engine you prefer. www.goodtree.com is a apparently a charity-type search engine, which is an amalgamation of the main search engine companies. Helps a good cause if you look about there ) to find some information about the publishers you'll be looking at for your genre. (i.e. we didn't exactly want to send our fantasy novel off to the Vintage Books imprint of a publishing house ) Find out which publishers are likely to accept you, or which ones you would like to accept you. Then do some research on them. They will generally tell you on their website if they want the prologue and first 3 chapters, or the first x-hundred words, or a synopsis or whatever it may be. Or you can of course ring them up and ask them, or send them an e-mail. Don't be afraid to do this! It often saves a lot of hassle. Also, there are few things more annoying to publishers than someone submitting something that does not follow the guidlines which they express. Make sure that your publisher is happy for you to e-mail it to them, and if not, then send a hard copy. Your e-mail will at best get glanced at then deleted, and most likely won't even get past their heavy filtering system. If you do send an e-mail, also check if they like it as part of the e-mail, or as an attachment, and in which format (.doc, .pdf, etc.).
    Remember that you will get turned down. And again. And again and again and again. If not - great! Congratulations! If, however, you do, then don't worry. don't get worked up saying 'they didn't even look at the whole thing! How can they only decide on the merit of a few pages! This is so unfair!'. It is unfair, but they receive mountains of stuff each day, and cannot afford to look through an entire MSS. Simply keep on trying. Remeber that even JRRTolkien and JKRowling got turned down by most of the publishers before being accepted! If you keep on sending off your script, then you will get an answer at some stage. The general procedure is for you to send to the publisher e.g. the first 3 chapters. They will then dump it in a pile. Your precious MSS will stay there for a long time, while you are anxiously biting your fingernails, wondering what is happening to it. After a few days/weeks/perhaps even month someone will pick it up and flick through it. If they don't like it, they'll bin it. You may at this stage get a letter saying "thank you, [bla bla bla] but we're sorry that we can't find a place for this in our publishing schedule at the moment". If, however, they do like it, they will request the full MSS from you. Then you have to once more wait for a month, or few weeks at the least. (times may vary hugely depending on who you send it to. If it is a small, individually owned agency, for example, your MSS might get read within a couple of weeks. If you send it to a publishing giant such as Random House, it will probably take a considerable amount longer, simply because they receive so much more!) They will then send you a letter, saying either that they regret that they can't see it fitting in, or that they would like to discuss things further. If the latter is the case; congratulations! But you are still far from published. You need to negotiate the terms of the contract(s), publication date, the front cover design, extras (such as a map, or glossary, or 'on the author' etc.) font size, dimensions of the book, indents, promotional pictures, promotional activities. . . Although you will only have control over these if it explicitly says so in your contract. If you sign a simple contract, which fails to mention these things, you may find that it is all out of your hands, and you may end up looking at the hardcopy of your book, thinking that the front page is awful! Or you could inform yourself about contracts, then show the publisher that they're dealing with someone who knows their stuff, and make sure you have some control over that side of things. Once the contract is out of the way, you still need to do all the editing / do the adjustments the editor from the publisher suggests you do.

    As you can see, it is a lot of hard work. I am by no means an expert! I've only been lucky enough to experience this first hand, but I'm sure that there are plent of people on TSR that are more knowledgeable than I on such matters.
    The above help is also only what we experienced. I.e. without an agent or an editor going through it first. It is generally recommended that you get a decent literary agent before a publisher, because they will look at the contract for you, and get you a far better deal than you are likely to get. They do take a certain %age off what you get, but you will probably end up with more than if you had missed out the agent, so it is worth it.
    Your book is also likely to benefit hugely from a good editor. Now, editors can be nasty people, as far as you, the author is concerned. Firstly, you pay them. Before you are even guaranteed that you will sell your book. (Well, unless you happen to have some very good connections, and know some very kind editors! That is something most of us don't, however ) Secondly, they rip your book apart without any seeming care for your creation. It is often hard for an author to see their MSS changed about so much, and sentences that you thought the world of seemingly destroyed beyond repair. But remember that the editor will know what they're doing. (hopefully - get as much info on the editor as possible beforehand, so that you're sure it's someone who knows the genre, and what people want to read) I've seen that a lot of authors say that "Every book benefits greatly from a good editor going through it". If nothing else, they will pick up inconsistencies and other small flaws that you failed to see.
    For agents - follow similarly as with publishers. Only that once you've got an agent, they will take care of the headache of finding a publisher, and getting you a good deal, and a say in the cover art etc. etc.


    Well, I sure did not intend to write that much! (That sounds horribly american, doesn't it?) But if anyone can be bothered to look through that, I'm sure it'll be helpful. Remeber, though, that it's not expert advise - just some tips that I would give. Wow, that really is a lot that I wrote there! Perhaps I should save it to post again some time, or improve on it, and place it somewhere were more people can benefit from it :rolleyes: Josiette, you prompted the longest post out of me that I have ever made on TSR, I do believe!
    Hehe! Great post! Awesome information there! Read it all and it was all really interesting. I can see that I have met someone else who really doesn love writing and is serious about it from the length and content of that post.:yy:

    A few questions though:

    How do you get an agent?

    How can one who isn't rich afford an editor?

    Editors can pick up on flaws but not have the right to actually change what you have written, right? As in if you wanted for someone to mark it but not actually edit :p:/rewrite parts of it, then they could inform them that that is what you require of them and will thus be paying them for and that you will see your work after they've been through it so as to check this and perhaps improve on any of the comments?

    How much of the % of profits/money made on the book do you receive? I think that might be referred to as royalties. More than 10% right?
    If I had lots of money I'd prefer to publish it myself but as that's not the case, if I get to finishing and wanting to publish my work, I plan to do all the writing part, obviously :rolleyes:, all the illustrations and drawings, with story board of design development for these in my portfolio, do the cover design, hardness and type of paper, put significant input into the designs, graphics and words of the promotions, and have input on where and when it is sold. Will I receive more of the profits/money made on my book(s) than compared to someone who just did the writing of the book only and had someone else do all the rest?

    Where do you go for all the advice on publishing- the technicalities and processes of everything? Because I can see that this would be essential but as it is I don't know about this stuff and I wouldn't know where to go to to get information and advice on this stuff either.

    When you send chapters or your whole manuscript off to publishers, there isn't a risk of plagiarism is there? Are your rights for that preserved, like you could sue them/charge them if they plagiarised, stole or borrowed parts of your work? Because I'm fiercely protective of my ideas and creations.

    Are you self-publishing yours?

    How many copies are being released of your and your brother's book and where? Because it costs more to publish more copies of the book unless in some form of discounted bulk order, right?

    Hope I don't sound a liitle stupid as I'm just a little as I don't know about all the technicalities and ins and outs of these, but would really like to.
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    (Original post by Elements)
    Hehe! Great post! Awesome information there! Read it all and it was all really interesting. I can see that I have met someone else who really doesn love writing and is serious about it from the length and content of that post.:yy:

    A few questions though:

    How do you get an agent?
    Best thing is to do a search (internet, or the better option: "The writers' and artists' yearbook" Is what I think it's called. It's got everyone in it - publishers, agents, editors) and find an agent who knows / deals in your genre. Then find out (website, e-mail or phone call) how much they like to see, and in what format. e.g. prologue and first three chapters in hard copy. You then send that to them with a cover letter (Hello... here is the prologue and... of my novel.... ) This should be kept to less than one page. You then wait, and they'll tell you if they want to see the whole MSS.

    It's pretty similar to publishers, really. We sent bits off to agents and publishers at the same time, becuase roughly the sme things are involved

    (Original post by Elements)
    How can one who isn't rich afford an editor?

    Editors can pick up on flaws but not have the right to actually change what you have written, right? As in if you wanted for someone to mark it but not actually edit :p:/rewrite parts of it, then they could inform them that that is what you require of them and will thus be paying them for and that you will see your work after they've been through it so as to check this and perhaps improve on any of the comments?
    Well, find a cheap editor. Or don't bother. Get friends/family to look through it and pick up spelling mistakes, inconsistencies etc. They won't be as good as a proper editor, but will be something.

    Editors only give suggestions as to how they would edit the MSS. That is why it helps to find a sample of that editors editing beforehand, if you can, so that you can see if you like their 'style'. It is still you, however, who sends the MSS off to an agent/publisher.
    Unless it is your publishers's editor you are working with. This then depends on the details of your contract, I think. But generally, the editor will again only suggest changes, and leave it for you to implement. sometimes the publisher may have a stronger or weaker say on the matter - this depends on the contract and your relation with them.

    Hope that answers that

    (Original post by Elements)
    How much of the % of profits/money made on the book do you receive? I think that might be referred to as royalties. More than 10% right?
    Correct: Royalties First, the author recieves what is known as an Advance. But this is merely what it says: and advance on the royalties. i.e. your Advance is deducted from the first Royalties. e.g. if your royalties are at say 10%, and your advance is £1000, then for the first £1000 worth of Royalties, you won't actually recieve anything, because it will be paying back the Advance. Do a bit of googling if you still don't understand this

    Royalties are very roughly speaking around 10%, yes. But this can vary enourmously! For a first-time author (i.e. not yet published) the figure is likely to be much smaller, because the publisher is taking a greater risk. For an already well-established author, the Royalties might be higher, because the publisher can be sure that the books will sell. So don't expect to be getting offers of over 10% for your first book. I know, this does not sound good, but nobody becomes a writer because of the money That is the reason most writers need the Advance!
    (Original post by Elements)
    If I had lots of money I'd prefer to publish it myself but as that's not the case, if I get to finishing and wanting to publish my work, I plan to do all the writing part, obviously :rolleyes:, all the illustrations and drawings, with story board of design development for these in my portfolio, do the cover design, hardness and type of paper, put significant input into the designs, graphics and words of the promotions, and have input on where and when it is sold. Will I receive more of the profits/money made on my book(s) than compared to someone who just did the writing of the book only and had someone else do all the rest?
    Hm, I really don't know. The chances are that - although your illustrations etc. will be great, I'm sure! - your publisher will want them done professionally. I suppose it depends on the relation between you and your publisher. If you can show them that you are putting in considerable effort and help, they may be willing to raise the Royalties, or some other beneficial thing. I am not experienced enough, though, and can't give you any definite answer, I'm afraid

    (Original post by Elements)
    Where do you go for all the advice on publishing- the technicalities and processes of everything? Because I can see that this would be essential but as it is I don't know about this stuff and I wouldn't know where to go to to get information and advice on this stuff either.
    Do a google for a forum. That's most likely to be the best place, anyway. Otherwise, you may want to check out other authors' websites; they often have info for authors. I know that Holly Lisle has a good website, which is very helpful. Just search around a bit on the net. There's stacks of info, just look around somewhere. There must be numerous forums helping people. Again, try to look specific for your genre, as that helps, but general info is better than none

    (Original post by Elements)
    When you send chapters or your whole manuscript off to publishers, there isn't a risk of plagiarism is there? Are your rights for that preserved, like you could sue them/charge them if they plagiarised, stole or borrowed parts of your work? Because I'm fiercely protective of my ideas and creations.
    lol Yes, there is a slight danger, I suppose. But I don't think that a publishing company will risk it. If you only send them the first bit, and the synopsis, that's all they'll have. You, on the other hand, will have all the notes and everything that you made while thinking about the book. So if it ever came to reviewing proof of who the originator of the ideas is, you'll have tons of stuff. In the end, it's a danger that all published authors have had to go through. There may be some technicalities that can help you, but again, I'm not experienced enough. These are probably questions you should be asking in an expert forum, rather than a teenage author :p:

    (Original post by Elements)
    Are you self-publishing yours?

    How many copies are being released of your and your brother's book and where? Because it costs more to publish more copies of the book unless in some form of discounted bulk order, right?
    We toyed with the idea of self-publishing, but decided against it, because of the effort and mainly because of the marketing and publicity - we wouldn't know who to contact, how to get our books in the main book stores, and how to get decent publicity. So we settled with a professional publisher.

    In general, it costs less per book if you print a large number. Simply because then the type-setting / setting up costs are distributed over a larger number of books. (e.g. if it costs £1000 for all the set-up costs, and you only print 100 books, then each book will cost £10 more. If you print 1000 books, each will only cost £1 more )

    Hopefully we'll have our books distributed pretty much everywhere So main bookstores should have them. And we're already gearing up towards the second print run Some details can be found on our publishers website.

    (Original post by Elements)
    Hope I don't sound a liitle stupid as I'm just a little as I don't know about all the technicalities and ins and outs of these, but would really like to.
    No problem. Hope that helped somewhat
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    Look through some of these, perhaps

    http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en...y+agents&meta=
    http://www.goodtree.com/search?query...+&category=web
    http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=lit...p=mss&ei=UTF-8
    http://uk.ask.com/web?q=literary+age...2&l=dir&dm=all

    or any similar search terms
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    Best thing is to do a search (internet, or the better option: "The writers' and artists' yearbook" Is what I think it's called. It's got everyone in it - publishers, agents, editors) and find an agent who knows / deals in your genre. Then find out (website, e-mail or phone call) how much they like to see, and in what format. e.g. prologue and first three chapters in hard copy. You then send that to them with a cover letter (Hello... here is the prologue and... of my novel.... ) This should be kept to less than one page. You then wait, and they'll tell you if they want to see the whole MSS.

    It's pretty similar to publishers, really. We sent bits off to agents and publishers at the same time, becuase roughly the sme things are involved


    Well, find a cheap editor. Or don't bother. Get friends/family to look through it and pick up spelling mistakes, inconsistencies etc. They won't be as good as a proper editor, but will be something.

    Editors only give suggestions as to how they would edit the MSS. That is why it helps to find a sample of that editors editing beforehand, if you can, so that you can see if you like their 'style'. It is still you, however, who sends the MSS off to an agent/publisher.
    Unless it is your publishers's editor you are working with. This then depends on the details of your contract, I think. But generally, the editor will again only suggest changes, and leave it for you to implement. sometimes the publisher may have a stronger or weaker say on the matter - this depends on the contract and your relation with them.

    Hope that answers that


    Correct: Royalties First, the author recieves what is known as an Advance. But this is merely what it says: and advance on the royalties. i.e. your Advance is deducted from the first Royalties. e.g. if your royalties are at say 10%, and your advance is £1000, then for the first £1000 worth of Royalties, you won't actually recieve anything, because it will be paying back the Advance. Do a bit of googling if you still don't understand this

    Royalties are very roughly speaking around 10%, yes. But this can vary enourmously! For a first-time author (i.e. not yet published) the figure is likely to be much smaller, because the publisher is taking a greater risk. For an already well-established author, the Royalties might be higher, because the publisher can be sure that the books will sell. So don't expect to be getting offers of over 10% for your first book. I know, this does not sound good, but nobody becomes a writer because of the money That is the reason most writers need the Advance!

    Hm, I really don't know. The chances are that - although your illustrations etc. will be great, I'm sure! - your publisher will want them done professionally. I suppose it depends on the relation between you and your publisher. If you can show them that you are putting in considerable effort and help, they may be willing to raise the Royalties, or some other beneficial thing. I am not experienced enough, though, and can't give you any definite answer, I'm afraid


    Do a google for a forum. That's most likely to be the best place, anyway. Otherwise, you may want to check out other authors' websites; they often have info for authors. I know that Holly Lisle has a good website, which is very helpful. Just search around a bit on the net. There's stacks of info, just look around somewhere. There must be numerous forums helping people. Again, try to look specific for your genre, as that helps, but general info is better than none


    lol Yes, there is a slight danger, I suppose. But I don't think that a publishing company will risk it. If you only send them the first bit, and the synopsis, that's all they'll have. You, on the other hand, will have all the notes and everything that you made while thinking about the book. So if it ever came to reviewing proof of who the originator of the ideas is, you'll have tons of stuff. In the end, it's a danger that all published authors have had to go through. There may be some technicalities that can help you, but again, I'm not experienced enough. These are probably questions you should be asking in an expert forum, rather than a teenage author :p:


    We toyed with the idea of self-publishing, but decided against it, because of the effort and mainly because of the marketing and publicity - we wouldn't know who to contact, how to get our books in the main book stores, and how to get decent publicity. So we settled with a professional publisher.

    In general, it costs less per book if you print a large number. Simply because then the type-setting / setting up costs are distributed over a larger number of books. (e.g. if it costs £1000 for all the set-up costs, and you only print 100 books, then each book will cost £10 more. If you print 1000 books, each will only cost £1 more )

    Hopefully we'll have our books distributed pretty much everywhere So main bookstores should have them. And we're already gearing up towards the second print run Some details can be found on our publishers website.


    No problem. Hope that helped somewhat
    Yes it did so thank-you for your informed response and putting up with me being annoying by asking loads of questions.

    Writers and artists yearbook- will google it and have a look around. Iss it on the net or to be bought in bookform at what price?:ninja: *Another question, oh!:ninja:*.

    I think that when I get to that stage, which is still a few years away or so I'd say , I'll be my own editor and get some family and friends to have a look over it instead.

    I know about the writer and money thing- that's not what I do my writing for, I do it because I really enjoy it and it allows me to discover more about the world and myself at the same time.

    My artwork is excellent btw.

    I know but I don't know any expert forums so sorry for me badgering you instead.

    Will look at those sites and am going to be buying your book when it comes out! The date for that shares an important date alrewady on my calendar so I wont forget.

    Thanks and sorry for being a pain once again.
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    Thanks!:hugs: Am doing so.:yy: Rep is on its way to you asap.
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    (Original post by Sir Esh)
    Best thing is to do a search (internet, or the better option: "The writers' and artists' yearbook" Is what I think it's called. It's got everyone in it - publishers, agents, editors) and find an agent who knows / deals in your genre. Then find out (website, e-mail or phone call) how much they like to see, and in what format. e.g. prologue and first three chapters in hard copy. You then send that to them with a cover letter (Hello... here is the prologue and... of my novel.... ) This should be kept to less than one page. You then wait, and they'll tell you if they want to see the whole MSS.

    It's pretty similar to publishers, really. We sent bits off to agents and publishers at the same time, becuase roughly the sme things are involved


    Well, find a cheap editor. Or don't bother. Get friends/family to look through it and pick up spelling mistakes, inconsistencies etc. They won't be as good as a proper editor, but will be something.

    Editors only give suggestions as to how they would edit the MSS. That is why it helps to find a sample of that editors editing beforehand, if you can, so that you can see if you like their 'style'. It is still you, however, who sends the MSS off to an agent/publisher.
    Unless it is your publishers's editor you are working with. This then depends on the details of your contract, I think. But generally, the editor will again only suggest changes, and leave it for you to implement. sometimes the publisher may have a stronger or weaker say on the matter - this depends on the contract and your relation with them.

    Hope that answers that


    Correct: Royalties First, the author recieves what is known as an Advance. But this is merely what it says: and advance on the royalties. i.e. your Advance is deducted from the first Royalties. e.g. if your royalties are at say 10%, and your advance is £1000, then for the first £1000 worth of Royalties, you won't actually recieve anything, because it will be paying back the Advance. Do a bit of googling if you still don't understand this

    Royalties are very roughly speaking around 10%, yes. But this can vary enourmously! For a first-time author (i.e. not yet published) the figure is likely to be much smaller, because the publisher is taking a greater risk. For an already well-established author, the Royalties might be higher, because the publisher can be sure that the books will sell. So don't expect to be getting offers of over 10% for your first book. I know, this does not sound good, but nobody becomes a writer because of the money That is the reason most writers need the Advance!

    Hm, I really don't know. The chances are that - although your illustrations etc. will be great, I'm sure! - your publisher will want them done professionally. I suppose it depends on the relation between you and your publisher. If you can show them that you are putting in considerable effort and help, they may be willing to raise the Royalties, or some other beneficial thing. I am not experienced enough, though, and can't give you any definite answer, I'm afraid


    Do a google for a forum. That's most likely to be the best place, anyway. Otherwise, you may want to check out other authors' websites; they often have info for authors. I know that Holly Lisle has a good website, which is very helpful. Just search around a bit on the net. There's stacks of info, just look around somewhere. There must be numerous forums helping people. Again, try to look specific for your genre, as that helps, but general info is better than none


    lol Yes, there is a slight danger, I suppose. But I don't think that a publishing company will risk it. If you only send them the first bit, and the synopsis, that's all they'll have. You, on the other hand, will have all the notes and everything that you made while thinking about the book. So if it ever came to reviewing proof of who the originator of the ideas is, you'll have tons of stuff. In the end, it's a danger that all published authors have had to go through. There may be some technicalities that can help you, but again, I'm not experienced enough. These are probably questions you should be asking in an expert forum, rather than a teenage author :p:


    We toyed with the idea of self-publishing, but decided against it, because of the effort and mainly because of the marketing and publicity - we wouldn't know who to contact, how to get our books in the main book stores, and how to get decent publicity. So we settled with a professional publisher.

    In general, it costs less per book if you print a large number. Simply because then the type-setting / setting up costs are distributed over a larger number of books. (e.g. if it costs £1000 for all the set-up costs, and you only print 100 books, then each book will cost £10 more. If you print 1000 books, each will only cost £1 more )

    Hopefully we'll have our books distributed pretty much everywhere So main bookstores should have them. And we're already gearing up towards the second print run Some details can be found on our publishers website.


    No problem. Hope that helped somewhat
    Wow! Thanks for all that information, I would love to write a romance novel/film, I just dont know where to start.

    Many people say that my life could be a film but isn't there problems writing about other real people? They would want to sue me? :s:
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    (Original post by kirstinx)
    Many people say that my life could be a film but isn't there problems writing about other real people? They would want to sue me? :s:
    This is called roman à clef, and technically it isn't illegal (I think) as long as you change names, since it's very hard to prove such things! :p: If you portray anyone unpleasantly, though, then yes you're on shaky ground (libel etc). Best to change names, places and details, if I were you.

    Or just get their permission.

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