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Best Universities for Computer Graphics/Animation?

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    Hi Shane

    Thanks for your interest in the MA in Animation at Hertfordshire (We no longer have a specific 2D only MA, there is now a single Animation MA so that students can work in whatever media they prefer). To answer your question, yes your portfolio is fine for application to the MA at Hertfordshire . Applications should be complete before the end of June, but it's advisable to do this earlier to ensure that all the paperwork gets completed. To also be fair, seeing as you mentioned Bournemouth, there is a 2D Animation (or 2D orientated Animation MA) but it's at AUCB, not at NCCA:

    http://www.aucb.ac.uk/courses/postgr...animation.aspx

    Hope that helps you
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    (Original post by features)
    Hi everyone,


    Im looking to specialise in 2D traditional/ Digital animation, something Ive held a strong interest and carried out much research upon since the age of 16. I believe I am currently quite good, if lacking strong understanding of anatomy and perspective drawing. I wish to take the next step and become good enough to do this for a living, with the confidence to know I would be capable of high quality/ professinal work.

    Ive already studied at the Univesity of Ulster doing Multimedia computing and Design and feel that Herts is the most fitting 2D animation course available (I do not see one listed for Bournemouth). There are very few specialist 2D animators in Northern Irleand, let alone good ones, a role I would like to fill!


    However I am a perfectionist and hate to show off unfinished work and I believe most good universities like to see a portfolio before taking on a Post Grad student. I am producing high quality work for a showreel but it is not complete and I feel I am running short of time to apply, so I guess my question is, in your opinion is my current online portfolio of work good enough to just apply now? Theres very little animation, mostly just 2D illustration and drawings, I am capable of so much better than those uploaded, so I have been holding back on applying, maybe too late already.


    I really dont want to wait another year to take the plunge, Im 25 now, but I feel my showreel may not be done to standard anytime soon. Do you think my Portofolio is passable for entry into a 2D masters course for entry as it stands?

    link:
    http://championfeatures.deviantart.com/

    Thanks for your time,
    Shane.
    Hey,

    If you're looking to an MA in animation where you can specialise in 2D then you might want to also check out UCA Farnham, link to the MA course: http://www.ucreative.ac.uk/ma-animation

    A lot of the students at Farnham tend to do post grad degrees at RCA or NFTS, which are other places you might want to check out. Plenty of freedom in all three courses to specialise in whatever area you wish
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    Hello everyone!

    I'm wanting to go to university to study computer animation next year (Sept. 2013) and after reading some of the previous posts here I'm starting to get slightly nervous over the whole portfolio.

    What I've been working on portfolio-wise at the moment is making animations in flash (Which I've been using since I was about 12/13), teaching myself more about animating properly using inbetweens and such rather than simple cartoons. After reading Moid's portfolio requirements for places such as Hartford and Bournemouth, I've become pretty worried that my animations aren't at a high enough standard/ not focusing on the right areas. I've always drawn in cartoony styles and never seriously attempted anything like life drawing or understanding the human muscle/skeleton structure before in my life.

    I've been posting my (portfolio worthy!) work online here: http://harutheotaku.deviantart.com/gallery/37190075 ,But I'm just worried that my skills at serious art aren't good enough, and I'm not sure about doing a foundation year. My top 4 choices are:
    1.Tesside
    2. Ravensbourne
    3. Glamorgan
    4. Lancashire

    But I've really got my heart set on Teesside

    Any advice/help people can give me would be much, much appreciated!
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    Hi there

    Are you applying for 2D or 3D Animation? Most of the discussion in this thread is about 3D (or related fields), so the advice given is going to be somewhat skewed towards this form of animation. Having said that, any animation course that offers a place without seeing your life drawing is not worth attending. If you study the work of any famous 2D animator, you will find someone who can draw first, and animate secondly. You need to understand the structure of a real living creature before you can caricature it in motion to any degree of success.

    It's great that you are starting to make some animation tests, but you really need to draw things! You've got a year to fix this (what course are you studying?) so it is possible to achieve better in that time frame.

    Walk Cycle 05/12 - the legs aren't moving enough, the character looks like he is scared of motion. His hands are pointing backwards rather painfully.
    Mystery keyframe test - not sure what this is supposed to be - the upper body is moving reasonably well (although what is happening is anyone's guess), but watch the legs - their position is expanding outwards without appearing to be moved by the hips. Before you animate anything, know exactly what is happening in the animation. Know who the character is, what their motivation is, how are they responding to their environment or situation, what mood are they in etc
    I don;t know what this is -I don;t either, and that's a bad thing for an animation - the arms are losing proportion bizarrely though. This is where knowledge of anatomy would tell you that arms do not shrink like that.

    Walk Cycle 3 - the torso does not move - you have moved the arms and legs, but the torso is static yet floating through space at the same time. When we walk, we walk from the hips. Animate them moving, up down, then the shoulders in opposite down up rhythm, then you'll see that the torso constantly bends and rotation/position of the arms and legs must adapt every frame to take this into account.

    Walk Cycle Feb 2012 - this is the most successful piece in your portfolio (with the exception of the bizarre scaling left arm - fix that and this would be worth showing as a portfolio example for application). Get some drawings online and then update us with what you have done.
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    (Original post by Harry_Smith64)
    Hello everyone!

    I'm wanting to go to university to study computer animation next year (Sept. 2013) and after reading some of the previous posts here I'm starting to get slightly nervous over the whole portfolio.

    What I've been working on portfolio-wise at the moment is making animations in flash (Which I've been using since I was about 12/13), teaching myself more about animating properly using inbetweens and such rather than simple cartoons. After reading Moid's portfolio requirements for places such as Hartford and Bournemouth, I've become pretty worried that my animations aren't at a high enough standard/ not focusing on the right areas. I've always drawn in cartoony styles and never seriously attempted anything like life drawing or understanding the human muscle/skeleton structure before in my life.

    I've been posting my (portfolio worthy!) work online here: http://harutheotaku.deviantart.com/gallery/37190075 ,But I'm just worried that my skills at serious art aren't good enough, and I'm not sure about doing a foundation year. My top 4 choices are:
    1.Tesside
    2. Ravensbourne
    3. Glamorgan
    4. Lancashire

    But I've really got my heart set on Teesside

    Any advice/help people can give me would be much, much appreciated!
    I genuinely wouldn't show any of that in an interview. I don't think it shows a great deal in terms of actual understanding of animation principles - the key ones being timing, anticipation, weight and secondary motions. I think the problem with saying that you've been using Flash since you're twelve is that it says more about your choice of software than any actual ambition or learning - I've been using Word since I was about 10, that doesn't mean I can write.

    I think that most of the interviewers would rather see simple animations with very simple forms that demonstrate you've followed a thought process such as that explained by moid above - you've thought about the character and how their body works, what motivates them and how this comes across in the way that they carry themselves. If they're huge people, it's not enough to simply move them slowly - in fact, that's often not relevant at all; It's more about how other areas react to that (be that the floor, the camera, other characters or even other parts of the same characters body).

    Start simple. Animate a bouncing ball. Anyone can linearly animate a circle moving down and then up, but there's more to it than that. Is it a snooker ball or a water balloon or a tennis ball or a basketball? We should be able to tell without any details more than its movement and its outline. There should be a sense of energy and weight about it. Once you've done that and you're happy with it, try animating a baseball bat hitting a ball - similar concepts but now there are two objects to consider (and their relative speeds to one another will make a big difference). There are lots of things you can do which show you understand the actual concepts of animation (if you do - if not, read a few books the like of which have been mentioned innumerate times in this thread) which you can play with very, very quickly such as those above. If you're bouncing a ball, you can do 20 iterations in an evening, and so see what's working and what isn't.
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    First of all, thank you very much Moid for taking the time to write such a detailed and helpful reply!

    I'm coming to the end of year 12 right now and I'm studying:
    Film Studies - A in coursework, predicted A in exam
    Product Study (Design) - A
    Geography - Predicted B
    ICT - Predicted C
    I'm planning on dropping ICT as soon as is humanly possible. It is completely not what I expected and has been useless to me - I guess this shows in my grade.

    I must admit, I was at first very disheartened after reading your response, Moid as there was a fair amount of criticism there. However, after thinking more about what you've said I now realise how helpful it actually is. I've never had anyone critically look at my work before. Parents are awful to present work to as they can never say anything harsh enough for me to learn from and my friends are the same. Your response has been a bit of a much needed kick up the arse, to be honest and has helped me to realise that if I want to stand even the slightest chance of achieving my dream then I need to start really pushing myself to be the best that I can be.

    Where I really want my career to end up is in the gaming industry, although I do really love animation in general. I've spoken to quite a few people from within the industry at last years Eurogamer Expo and they said that the best way for me to get in through animation would be to not do one of those courses that just advertise themselves and 'gaming' degrees and to go and learn the proper way of animation. So here I am. The main reason I was so interested in Teesside was because of the Animex Expo, but I think that may have blinded me from looking at other universities, and after looking into and comparing Hertfordshire to Teesside I think it's clear that Hert is the much stronger university with far greater career prospects (Which is why we all do these courses anyway!)

    After college yesterday I ran out and bought an A4 sketchbook and some pencils, dug out 'The Complete Book of Drawing' by Barrington Barber that's been under my bed for years and started doing some sketches of objects around my room.

    I apologise for this massive essay detailing my entire life story, but it's become pretty clear to me that Hertfordshire is the best of the best (I am awful at maths, so BU is not really an option) and since you're one of the interviewers (and if I'm right, lecturer?) there I thought it would be best for me to show you how truly passionate I really am about animation so that you can remember me and my crapiness now and can look back on this when I'm being interviewed next year!

    This is not the last you have heard from me!
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    Hey,

    I'm currently wrapping up my GCSEs, and I've always wanted to do something in the games industry; I've been toying with graphic design/animation, and I think that the dynamism of animation will be better for me. My issue is that I've messed up my art GCSE (it's not that I'm bad at art, it's just that I didn't like the course and it really wasn't what what it was pitched to me as) and that has meant I haven't met the requirements to study art at A level. The painting and pastels and stuff really isn't for me; I like objective drawing and graphic design, and the nature of the course meant that painting and such was heavily endorsed by my teacher.

    I understand that life drawing is something that is highly recommended to learn for animation courses, but I just want to know if it's possible to self teach it to myself? I've looked into classes, and unfortunately most of the courses are miles away from me and I won't be able to get to them.

    In terms of my A levels that I've gone with I'm doing Comp. Science, Product Design, Biology and English Lit/Lang. In terms of my current modelling abilities I'm just learning the basics. I figured I'd start early.

    Any help?
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    (Original post by Spez)
    Hey,

    I'm currently wrapping up my GCSEs, and I've always wanted to do something in the games industry; I've been toying with graphic design/animation, and I think that the dynamism of animation will be better for me. My issue is that I've messed up my art GCSE (it's not that I'm bad at art, it's just that I didn't like the course and it really wasn't what what it was pitched to me as) and that has meant I haven't met the requirements to study art at A level. The painting and pastels and stuff really isn't for me; I like objective drawing and graphic design, and the nature of the course meant that painting and such was heavily endorsed by my teacher.

    I understand that life drawing is something that is highly recommended to learn for animation courses, but I just want to know if it's possible to self teach it to myself? I've looked into classes, and unfortunately most of the courses are miles away from me and I won't be able to get to them.

    In terms of my A levels that I've gone with I'm doing Comp. Science, Product Design, Biology and English Lit/Lang. In terms of my current modelling abilities I'm just learning the basics. I figured I'd start early.

    Any help?
    Hi Spez,

    If you are serious about doing games then what you really need is maths and art, possibly Physics depending if you want to go down a more technical or artistic route. Computer Science will help but chances are you will doing java or databases and I am not sure how useful that is in the games industry?

    You can always go ahead with you A level choices and apply with a strong art portfolio and try to get along to a couple of life drawing sessions. Or, you could take an art foundation after your A levels for one year and that would definably offer life drawing and make sure your portfolio is up to scratch to apply to uni one year later. The only other option is to take some sort of BTEC course instead of A levels in Art and Design or something similar.

    In terms of starting modelling early, remember you will be honing your 3D skills at university, so for now laying the foundations of solid drawing is more important than learning software as drawing skills will give you a life long advantage, where as learning a 3D package a couple of years early will not. I think you should try and push for art A level as your going to need a decent portfolio to get into to the better universities, if you think you have spare time to put that together than by all means do.

    I hope this helps,
    Monkie

    Bournemouth University, Computer Animation Arts 2nd year
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    Hey guys, I'll be buying a laptop this week for 3D animation for me and although I have read that yes, everyone recommends desktops because you get more for your money etcetc, I will be travelling back and forth London and bournemouth alot. That means I'll want to do work at home as well as in my own room at university so I like the portability of a laptop.

    So just wondering, is this enough for the software I'll be using?

    http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/toshiba...20792-pdt.html

    Thanks
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    Hello I'm entering in 2012 for Computer Animation Arts in Bournemouth University. I'm probably being really paranoid but I'm really worried about my maths grade!!

    The University has asked me for an A in Art, A in Maths and B in ICT. At the moment, I think I've gotten my A in Art and B in ICT but now I'm really worried about Maths.. I'm wondering if I slip up a B would they really not accept me : (? I'm most likely getting an A or A* in Japanese too and I'm hoping my Art could be A* even.
    Just also wondering if there are any other guys in entering the same course as me who have these grade requirements!
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    (Original post by Risururu)
    Hello I'm entering in 2012 for Computer Animation Arts in Bournemouth University. I'm probably being really paranoid but I'm really worried about my maths grade!!

    The University has asked me for an A in Art, A in Maths and B in ICT. At the moment, I think I've gotten my A in Art and B in ICT but now I'm really worried about Maths.. I'm wondering if I slip up a B would they really not accept me : (? I'm most likely getting an A or A* in Japanese too and I'm hoping my Art could be A* even.
    Just also wondering if there are any other guys in entering the same course as me who have these grade requirements!

    same course same issue :L they want an A in English from me, which is going to be really hit or miss and i dont think i will get it either, although i know that English has nothing to do with the course so hopefully they won't mind about it, but i am still really scared, so i'm hoping i get an A in business which also has nothing to do with course and hoping for an A* in graphics. I guess we just have to wait and see what happens... I've read through all the posts on this thread and i know people have gotten in without the requirements, but i think it then depends on the strength of your interview and portfolio, but good luck
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    (Original post by massiex)
    Hey guys, I'll be buying a laptop this week for 3D animation for me and although I have read that yes, everyone recommends desktops because you get more for your money etcetc, I will be travelling back and forth London and bournemouth alot. That means I'll want to do work at home as well as in my own room at university so I like the portability of a laptop.

    So just wondering, is this enough for the software I'll be using?

    http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/toshiba...20792-pdt.html

    Thanks
    Hi massiex,

    The Curry's website is under maintenance when I tried to look at it.. haha, quite a few people use laptops for the the exact reasons you have stated, look up the minimum specs for Maya 2012 and go from that, the uni computers are great so you wont have too much trouble anyway, but having something to work on in halls and at home is helpful. Sorry for being vague, message me if you want any more answers


    (Original post by Risururu)
    Hello I'm entering in 2012 for Computer Animation Arts in Bournemouth University. I'm probably being really paranoid but I'm really worried about my maths grade!!

    The University has asked me for an A in Art, A in Maths and B in ICT. At the moment, I think I've gotten my A in Art and B in ICT but now I'm really worried about Maths.. I'm wondering if I slip up a B would they really not accept me : (? I'm most likely getting an A or A* in Japanese too and I'm hoping my Art could be A* even.
    Just also wondering if there are any other guys in entering the same course as me who have these grade requirements!
    Hi Risururu,

    I think everyone gets offered ABB nowadays, so you will most defiantly be in the same boat as most people. Just do your best and that's all you can hope for anyway... I am current second year at Bournemouth doing Computer Animation Arts and I missed my entry for Bournemouth by 2 grades! :s, however I did get an A* in Art, they take all the grades into consideration. Just do your best and that's all you can hope for. I got lucky, i'm sure you will be fine.

    Best of luck,
    Monkie

    Second year Bournemouth University, Computer Animation Arts
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    Wow your replies have been very helpful thank you! I can breathe a sigh of relief now ahh..although of course I'll still try my best anyway : ) Thanks
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    (Original post by Harry_Smith64)
    First of all, thank you very much Moid for taking the time to write such a detailed and helpful reply!

    I'm coming to the end of year 12 right now and I'm studying:
    Film Studies - A in coursework, predicted A in exam
    Product Study (Design) - A
    Geography - Predicted B
    ICT - Predicted C
    I'm planning on dropping ICT as soon as is humanly possible. It is completely not what I expected and has been useless to me - I guess this shows in my grade.

    I must admit, I was at first very disheartened after reading your response, Moid as there was a fair amount of criticism there. However, after thinking more about what you've said I now realise how helpful it actually is. I've never had anyone critically look at my work before. Parents are awful to present work to as they can never say anything harsh enough for me to learn from and my friends are the same. Your response has been a bit of a much needed kick up the arse, to be honest and has helped me to realise that if I want to stand even the slightest chance of achieving my dream then I need to start really pushing myself to be the best that I can be.

    Where I really want my career to end up is in the gaming industry, although I do really love animation in general. I've spoken to quite a few people from within the industry at last years Eurogamer Expo and they said that the best way for me to get in through animation would be to not do one of those courses that just advertise themselves and 'gaming' degrees and to go and learn the proper way of animation. So here I am. The main reason I was so interested in Teesside was because of the Animex Expo, but I think that may have blinded me from looking at other universities, and after looking into and comparing Hertfordshire to Teesside I think it's clear that Hert is the much stronger university with far greater career prospects (Which is why we all do these courses anyway!)

    After college yesterday I ran out and bought an A4 sketchbook and some pencils, dug out 'The Complete Book of Drawing' by Barrington Barber that's been under my bed for years and started doing some sketches of objects around my room.

    I apologise for this massive essay detailing my entire life story, but it's become pretty clear to me that Hertfordshire is the best of the best (I am awful at maths, so BU is not really an option) and since you're one of the interviewers (and if I'm right, lecturer?) there I thought it would be best for me to show you how truly passionate I really am about animation so that you can remember me and my crapiness now and can look back on this when I'm being interviewed next year!

    This is not the last you have heard from me!
    No problem, I'm glad you didn't take it too badly. Thanks for the compliments I am indeed one of the lecturers (and interviewing staff). I'm happy to hear that you are starting to draw. Seeing as you are considering Games Art as a possible future direction I have some suggestions for you:

    Buy, read and do the exercises from:

    Vanishing Point - Jason Cheeseman-Meyer - a good book on perspective and how to draw it, once you can handle that, get:

    The Skillful Huntsman - Mike Yamada et al - a great book on creative design for characters and environments that has a distinctly games art slant to it.

    And at the same time get hold of Photoshop and watch the videos of Feng Zhu on Youtube - hundreds of very impressive concept art painting tutorials by one of the most famous concept artists in the world.

    Once you feel your traditional / 2D Digital skills are coming on well, then get Maya http://students.autodesk.com/?nd=download_center from Autodesk for free, and start learning how to use it, and then get a game engine like Unreal Development Kit and start making 3D objects in Maya and exporting them to a game level / environment.

    If you zip through that lot, let me know and I'll recommend a longer list.


    Do you get to make films as part of film studies, or is it purely a theoretical course? Try to use Product Design as an excuse to make stuff in 3D in Maya Geoegraphy... hmmm not sure how to spin that towards games, just use it to acquire knowledge about the world. Good luck!
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    Hi everyone, Ive just applied for the MA in Animation at Hertfordshire (I hope at least, that online application was feeding me quite a few errors); easily my first choice, but this is still highly dependant on whether I can secure enough funding, hopefully this isnt an issue.

    On that note, as an Irish/ British citizen I am lucky enough to be able to claim free tuition in Scotland. Is there a particularly good animation college I could option as a second choice, with good lecturers for traditional/ Digital 2D animation?
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    I'm really the wrong person to be telling you this, but I've seen some impressive 2D Animation from Duncan's of Jordanstone - I don't know anything about the staff though. Maybe I'll be seeing you in October
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    Hey people,

    So been reading up recently on Bournemouth computer visualization course, people have said the course is 10% life drawings and they would like to see this in a portfolio.

    I haven't done much drawing recently, would I be penelised for not taking Art at A level? I'm currently taking Math, Physics, Computing and Graphics. Graphics would cover as an art subject right? As they require one along with a more technical subject. I SHOULD be getting A for Computing, A for Graphics, B for Math and probably C for physics, do these grades seem okay to apply with? I will probably have to retake one or two of these modules for these exams though as I f*d up on them because I chose to do last minute revision :| Don't ask, I've just always been really lazy :/

    Would they accept 3d work as a portfolio? Considering I am going into a 3d course, because I am much more experienced in that field I know how to use programs pretty well as its been a hobby for a few years actually. (Programs such as After Effects, Nuke, 3Ds Max, C4D, Realflow; I use them all regularly) Not that I can't draw, I'm decent actually, better than some of the people who do take art in my school but would just be good to know before hand so I can start getting back into drawing.

    If anyone is currently doing this course may I ask what sorts of computers they have available for it? Are they proper workstations equipped with the latest Quadros? Or just bog standard ones? I heard they also use Maya and Houdini, is this true? I'm going to the Open day on the 15th so hopefully I can check/ask when there but would be nice to know before

    I hear Hertfordshire is also very good, whats their course like? Bournemouth one is based a lot of Math and Programming too, which I like because my other career choice is towards computer science.

    Sorry I seem to be rambling on quite a lot .
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    For what it's worth, at work I have an absolute BEAST of a machine (24gb ram, 2 x 6 core xeon's - rendering is like playing snake, it's incredible) and a Quadro 4000 and I'll be honest, the graphics cards are just not worth the money. The difference between them and their equivalent gaming cards is so intangible - the price, however, is not. I built myself a machine at home recently and despite my use of it being roughly half and half for 3D and gaming, I didn't even think twice about what type of card to get. In my opinion, workstation cards are for people with more money than sense. The only reason we get them at work is because you can't really find decent workstations (as in, all the OTHER components), professionally put together, than don't have Quadro's or FirePro's.
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    (Original post by userage)
    Hey people,

    So been reading up recently on Bournemouth computer visualization course, people have said the course is 10% life drawings and they would like to see this in a portfolio.

    I haven't done much drawing recently, would I be penelised for not taking Art at A level? I'm currently taking Math, Physics, Computing and Graphics. Graphics would cover as an art subject right? As they require one along with a more technical subject. I SHOULD be getting A for Computing, A for Graphics, B for Math and probably C for physics, do these grades seem okay to apply with? I will probably have to retake one or two of these modules for these exams though as I f*d up on them because I chose to do last minute revision :| Don't ask, I've just always been really lazy :/

    Would they accept 3d work as a portfolio? Considering I am going into a 3d course, because I am much more experienced in that field I know how to use programs pretty well as its been a hobby for a few years actually. (Programs such as After Effects, Nuke, 3Ds Max, C4D, Realflow; I use them all regularly) Not that I can't draw, I'm decent actually, better than some of the people who do take art in my school but would just be good to know before hand so I can start getting back into drawing.

    If anyone is currently doing this course may I ask what sorts of computers they have available for it? Are they proper workstations equipped with the latest Quadros? Or just bog standard ones? I heard they also use Maya and Houdini, is this true? I'm going to the Open day on the 15th so hopefully I can check/ask when there but would be nice to know before

    I hear Hertfordshire is also very good, whats their course like? Bournemouth one is based a lot of Math and Programming too, which I like because my other career choice is towards computer science.

    Sorry I seem to be rambling on quite a lot .
    Hertfordshire is quite fabulous if I say so myself (I might be slightly biased ). We cater more towards the art side of 3D rather than programming, so you should come and have a look at what we do, but if you really want to do coding you might enjoy Bournemouth more. One tip about asking questions on here - the staff of Bournemouth also read this thread, so it's not a good idea to mention being very lazy - it tends to make either of us somewhat reticent towards offering a place... 3D is really not a place to go to if you don't like working every hour of the day or night. If you apply to Hertfordshire we will want to see life drawing as well - it's the most important part of a portfolio.
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    (Original post by moid)
    Hertfordshire is quite fabulous if I say so myself (I might be slightly biased ). We cater more towards the art side of 3D rather than programming, so you should come and have a look at what we do, but if you really want to do coding you might enjoy Bournemouth more. One tip about asking questions on here - the staff of Bournemouth also read this thread, so it's not a good idea to mention being very lazy - it tends to make either of us somewhat reticent towards offering a place... 3D is really not a place to go to if you don't like working every hour of the day or night. If you apply to Hertfordshire we will want to see life drawing as well - it's the most important part of a portfolio.
    Thanks for a reply , I'm going to be at the Hertfordshire open day as well so I'll ask some stuff when there. I have no problem with working hours on end with 2D/3D content, I have done so many times in the past, I usually have to wait several hours for my renders to finish anyway haha. Thanks for the heads up though :P

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Updated: December 19, 2014
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