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Strange situation findings - help

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    Im currently going over the strange situation by Mary Ainsworth and I'm a bit confused about the findings. In my text book it says that:
    Secure attachment = 66%
    Insecure avoidant = 22%
    insecure resistant = 12%

    But online it says that:
    Secure attachment = 70%
    Insecure avoidant = 15%/20%
    Insecure resistant = 15%/10%

    Do any of you know what numbers are correct as I'm revising and i don't want to put incorrect figures down

    Thanks
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    Are the two findings from different studies? In my books, I have Ainsworth (1970) and then the second lot of findings you have written down - 70%/15%/15%. Nowhere have I come across the first percentages.
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    (Original post by mogwai98)
    Are the two findings from different studies? In my books, I have Ainsworth (1970) and then the second lot of findings you have written down - 70%/15%/15%. Nowhere have I come across the first percentages.
    The study in my AQA A book by Collins (fourth edition) says Ainsworth and Bell (1970) but the findings are not the same as yours but i'll just ask my teacher
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    (Original post by H.i)
    The study in my AQA A book by Collins (fourth edition) says Ainsworth and Bell (1970) but the findings are not the same as yours but i'll just ask my teacher
    Hmm... okay.
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    (Original post by H.i)
    The study in my AQA A book by Collins (fourth edition) says Ainsworth and Bell (1970) but the findings are not the same as yours but i'll just ask my teacher
    I don't think quoting specific numbers will matter (ball park figure will be fine).

    I briefly looked at the orginal studies:

    Ainsworth & Bell (1970) didn't classify children into different catagories (I couldn't find a single mention of "insecure" in the whole pdf document - > see for yourself! http://www.jstor.org.sci-hub.org/stable/1127388).

    A level textbook writers probably use figures mostly from other textbooks, which can easily be misquoted!

    Ainsworth (1971) looked at attachment in two seperate groups of children. If you look at the total then it goes 66.1%, 19.6%, 14.3% (secure, avoidant, ambivalent) (http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED056742.pdf pg.32)
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    (Original post by H.i)
    Im currently going over the strange situation by Mary Ainsworth and I'm a bit confused about the findings. In my text book it says that:
    Secure attachment = 66%
    Insecure avoidant = 22%
    insecure resistant = 12%

    But online it says that:
    Secure attachment = 70%
    Insecure avoidant = 15%/20%
    Insecure resistant = 15%/10%

    Do any of you know what numbers are correct as I'm revising and i don't want to put incorrect figures down

    Thanks
    My textbook gives the second set of figures
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    Okay thank you guys, i'll just go with the second set of figures
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    In my AQA B textbook we have the first set of figures.
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    Got 70% for secure and 15% for other two - AQA As Psychology A
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    Thats so weird, I'm doing AQA psychology A but my book has the first set of figures but I think I'll just go with second set of figures as they are much easier to remember


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    (Original post by H.i)
    Thats so weird, I'm doing AQA psychology A but my book has the first set of figures but I think I'll just go with second set of figures as they are much easier to remember


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The bottom set of figures are the same but rounded to the nearest 10%, which is realistically a good level to rememebr (you wouldn't get marked down for saying 65% rather than 66% ... )
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    (Original post by H.i)
    Im currently going over the strange situation by Mary Ainsworth and I'm a bit confused about the findings. In my text book it says that:
    Secure attachment = 66%
    Insecure avoidant = 22%
    insecure resistant = 12%

    But online it says that:
    Secure attachment = 70%
    Insecure avoidant = 15%/20%
    Insecure resistant = 15%/10%

    Do any of you know what numbers are correct as I'm revising and i don't want to put incorrect figures down

    Thanks
    honestly it doesn't matter if you have slight differences in the figures, i found this when i did A level psychology and as long as you have the roughly correct number then it is okay, i think i went for the rounded up numbers cause it was easiest to remember so 70%,20% and 10%

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Updated: April 9, 2015
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