Just one sec...
Hey! Sign in to get help with your study questionsNew here? Join for free to post

difference between pressure groups and New Social Movements?

Announcements Posted on
Take our short survey, £100 of Amazon vouchers to be won! 23-09-2016
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    can anyone tell me what the difference is between pressure groups and new social movements? thanks :p:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Pressure or Interest group: Wilson (1990) defines these as: “Organizations, separate from government, that attempt to influence public policy”. The difference (if any) between a pressure and interest group is it’s sometimes argued an Interest group doesn’t necessary try to apply “pressure” to political parties / governments. Smith (1995) suggests the two terms are often used interchangeably, mainly because such groups “seek to represent the interests of particular sections of society in order to influence public policy making”. A Pressure / Interest group’s main objective is to influence the decisions made by political parties (rather than to seek representation and power through elections) and they do this in a couple of ways:

    Direct action involves trying to influence government behaviour directly, through demonstrations, political events and the like.

    Indirect action involves trying to influence the general political philosophy of a party (to persuade a party to adopt a policy that reflects the interests of the pressure group, for example).

    A recent example of how some interest groups use a combination of these two forms of action is the Countryside Alliance, a pressure group initially formed to try to stop the government banning fox-hunting with dogs (unsuccessfully as it turned out - this activity was banned in 2005). Its direct actions involved mass public demonstrations and “political events” (such as interrupting a parliamentary debate) while it also campaigned indirectly through the media and the efforts of pro-fox-hunting MP’s to prevent a ban.

    New Social Movements: Barnartt and Scotch suggest NSM’s are more concerned with “Values (postmodern and post-materialistic), lifestyles, and self-actualization, especially among marginalized groups”. In other words, this type of movement focuses, to use Anspach’s (1979) phrase, on “Identity politics”.

    Different types of NSM:

    Alternative: This type provides an alternative to prevailing social norms. The focus of political change, therefore, is on developing different ways of doing things - such as home-schooling as an alternative to State schooling.

    Redemptive movements focus on “redeeming others”; a new form of Christianity focuses on changing people’s lives by requiring they embrace a different form of religious behaviour (a literal interpretation of the Bible, for example).

    Reformist movements seek to change society in some way - either, as in the case of the American Civil Rights movement, the relative position of ethnic groups or, as with 2nd wave feminism, relative gender positions. Change may be far-reaching but this type of movement doesn’t seek the revolutionary overthrow of the existing order; change, in other words, is incremental (one step at a time).

    Revolutionary social movements, such as Communism or Fascism, have as their political objective the overthrow (violent or otherwise) of an existing political order and its replacement by a new and different type of order.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chris.Livesey)
    Pressure or Interest group: Wilson (1990) defines these as: “Organizations, separate from government, that attempt to influence public policy”. The difference (if any) between a pressure and interest group is it’s sometimes argued an Interest group doesn’t necessary try to apply “pressure” to political parties / governments. Smith (1995) suggests the two terms are often used interchangeably, mainly because such groups “seek to represent the interests of particular sections of society in order to influence public policy making”. A Pressure / Interest group’s main objective is to influence the decisions made by political parties (rather than to seek representation and power through elections) and they do this in a couple of ways:

    Direct action involves trying to influence government behaviour directly, through demonstrations, political events and the like.

    Indirect action involves trying to influence the general political philosophy of a party (to persuade a party to adopt a policy that reflects the interests of the pressure group, for example).

    A recent example of how some interest groups use a combination of these two forms of action is the Countryside Alliance, a pressure group initially formed to try to stop the government banning fox-hunting with dogs (unsuccessfully as it turned out - this activity was banned in 2005). Its direct actions involved mass public demonstrations and “political events” (such as interrupting a parliamentary debate) while it also campaigned indirectly through the media and the efforts of pro-fox-hunting MP’s to prevent a ban.

    New Social Movements: Barnartt and Scotch suggest NSM’s are more concerned with “Values (postmodern and post-materialistic), lifestyles, and self-actualization, especially among marginalized groups”. In other words, this type of movement focuses, to use Anspach’s (1979) phrase, on “Identity politics”.

    Different types of NSM:

    Alternative: This type provides an alternative to prevailing social norms. The focus of political change, therefore, is on developing different ways of doing things - such as home-schooling as an alternative to State schooling.

    Redemptive movements focus on “redeeming others”; a new form of Christianity focuses on changing people’s lives by requiring they embrace a different form of religious behaviour (a literal interpretation of the Bible, for example).

    Reformist movements seek to change society in some way - either, as in the case of the American Civil Rights movement, the relative position of ethnic groups or, as with 2nd wave feminism, relative gender positions. Change may be far-reaching but this type of movement doesn’t seek the revolutionary overthrow of the existing order; change, in other words, is incremental (one step at a time).

    Revolutionary social movements, such as Communism or Fascism, have as their political objective the overthrow (violent or otherwise) of an existing political order and its replacement by a new and different type of order.
    thanks!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thanks, Chris, for the citation. Glad to hear someone remembers that piece.--Renee Anspach
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Thank you, Chris, for the citation. Glad someone remembers that piece!--Renee Anspach

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: May 18, 2014
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Poll
How do you eat your pizza

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22

Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.