Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey! Sign in to get help with your study questionsNew here? Join for free to post

Japanese Society

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by spencer-smith)
    What is kusottare (gaijin)?
    I believe it's a vulgar term along the lines of 'Damn foreigners!'

    I could be completely wrong though
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Is it just in hirakana or does it have a Kanji?
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Has anybody here taken a JLPT exam? I've done the fourth grade last year and if I've got the time I will try my luck with the sankyu
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by spencer-smith)
    Oh... so 外国人 is a less polite form than  外人.. Because it seems like 外国人 emphases the "external country" whereas 外人 simply means outsider.
    Yes, gaikokujin is considered more PC and specific. Technically.

    What is kusottare (gaijin)?
    ****ing foreigners! :laugh:
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    This is a very good site. Quite wordy at times, but good nonetheless.

    http://www.jref.com/language/japanese_grammar.shtml

    I'm in the process of slowly typing up grammar notes. My tip is to write them as clear and concise as you can. For instance, I have one A4 that describes how to create a polite verb from the dictionary form.

    Also I've created a excel spreadsheet with verbs, so I can just add new verbs and right down all the forms (conditional, polite, negative, imperative, volitional etc.)
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I don't know if everyone knows these but there is actually an active programme by the Japanese government to recruit university graduates to teach English in Japan. I am not sure if Lindsay Ann Hawker was part of this scheme. Probably after JPLT 3/2 or after a university degree it would be good to sign up this scheme to make the final push for greater Japanese fluency by surrounding yourself with native speakers.

    http://www.uk.emb-japan.go.jp/en/teach/jet_intro.html
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    The pay however is extremely low, at 3,600,000 yen per yr which works out to be about £16,000 per annum... But it is part of the learning experience I guess.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Spencer.Smith)
    I don't know if everyone knows these but there is actually an active programme by the Japanese government to recruit university graduates to teach English in Japan. I am not sure if Lindsay Ann Hawker was part of this scheme. Probably after JPLT 3/2 or after a university degree it would be good to sign up this scheme to make the final push for greater Japanese fluency by surrounding yourself with native speakers.

    http://www.uk.emb-japan.go.jp/en/teach/jet_intro.html
    Dude come on.

    I think she was in an eikaiwa. The best said about them, the better. Anyone wants to teach English in Japan, just avoid them like the plague. The lure of living/working in Japan is not great enough for you to forgo your basic ability and happiness. That place would destroy my soul like the seminal protagonist in a Bukowski novel. If you find me working in one of them, I give anyone the right to shoot me. I’ll even put it in writing and frame it for you.

    JET scheme kinda varies, my friend has been on it and she liked it. In some regards you get everything sorted for you (accommodation, finance, visa etc) but you don't really have an option over the placement. Often this means that you could end up in the middle of Yamanishi-ken with not much teaching facilities available. This is often especially true of places even outside of Tokyo. If you read and speak some Japanese then you can cherry-pick certain positions, because positions that do require some Japanese ability will often pay more (not by much however.)

    The pay is *okay* by Japanese standards. Enough to get by. I think JET often pay more than the average, but like I said won't take into account experience, certification and language ability. You're better off tackling the Japanese job sector by yourself, if you can handle it.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    http://homepage3.nifty.com/i-yasu/ESSAY-e4.htm
         The three centers (Tokyo, Yokohama, as well as the Kansai Center where I was around ) produced a textbook called Nihongo no Kiso (Foundations of Japanese) for a 100-hour technical trainee course. The technical trainees needed “survival Japanese,” including how to convey danger to people around them, how to tell someone that they had a stomachache, or how to ask questions.

         The aim of this new textbook was for technical trainees to master this survival Japanese by learning basic sentence patterns in a logical order. We carefully selected basic sentence patterns which trainees (as well as other foreigners who were beginning to study Japanese) needed and tried to create a textbook without any “extras.” We wanted technical trainees to use this textbook to acquire basic survival language abilities. From an audio-lingual method viewpoint, we wanted the learners to be able to use what they learned as soon as possible outside of class.

    In 1974 Nihongo no Kiso was revised and released as Shin Nihongo no Kiso (New Foundations of Japanese). This new edition incorporated natural Japanese, daily conversation, and conversation exercises. In 2001 Minna no Nihongo (Japanese for Everyone), a further adaptation of Shin Nihongo no Kiso, was published. In this volume we changed technical words used by trainees, such as “bolt” and “nut,” to words for everyday items.

    It could be said that the mother of all of these texts, Nihongo no Kiso, is the trunk of the tree with basic sentence patterns, and Shin Nihongo Kiso (1990) and Minna no Nihongo (1998) are the branches and leaves.

    There’s no denying that some, especially those who espoused the communicative approach, have found these texts to include unnatural expressions and sentences. The criticisms include that it is impolite to use the word anata (you) when asking, for example, “Where are you going?” (Anata wa doko e ikimasu ka?), or that it is rude, strange, and too direct to say “Nani o tabetai desu ka?” (What do you want to eat?) In natural conversation the sentence “Nani o tabetai desu ka?” would be “XX-san wa? (Mr./Ms. XX?) or “Nani o meshiagarimasu ka?” (polite; something like “Of what would you partake?”)

    Although they were the brunt of much criticism, Nihongo no Kiso and Shin Nihongo Kiso (perhaps Minna no Nihongo as well) have continuously been the best sellers among Japanese language textbooks for 30 years. They are used at universities in Japan and are highly regarded by both teachers and students because these textbooks are simple, intelligible, easy for beginners to memorize and easy to teach.

    Years later, when the textbook Situational Functional Japanese, which uses the communicative approach (and which I helped to write), was published by Tsukuba University, a publishing company in Taiwan offered to release it there. However, I understand that it did not sell well there because Shin Nihongo no Kiso had already been adopted by many Japanese language schools there and they did not want to change to a new textbook.

    Nihongo no Kiso is a textbook which reflects the time when the supreme principle of pattern drills, repetition and teacher-initianed lessons dominated.



    The creation of Nihongo no Kiso is still a very precious experience for me, and I was trained to maintain a fast-paced on-task class and to carry out sentence pattern practice, the foundations of the audio-lingual method. Even when the communicative approach became popular in later years, I appreciated the fact that I was able to cultivate the foundation of the audio-lingual method during my time at AOTS.
    Found this really useful explaining the relationship between Shin Nihongo no Kiso and Minna no Nihongo. The university that I would be heading soon is going to use Shin Nihongo no Kiso I and II for instruction. More importantly, I know that these two texts are very popular, and Minna no Nihongo looks like Shin Nihongo no Kiso (as in chapter layout, colouring... ) but the link between them is often left unexplained.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaijin)
    Dude come on.

    I think she was in an eikaiwa. The best said about them, the better. Anyone wants to teach English in Japan, just avoid them like the plague. The lure of living/working in Japan is not great enough for you to forgo your basic ability and happiness. That place would destroy my soul like the seminal protagonist in a Bukowski novel. If you find me working in one of them, I give anyone the right
    to shoot me. I’ll even put it in writing and frame it for you.
    I don't understand this part. What do you mean by that? I mean the JET scheme allows you to play teacher teaching actual Japanese kids English, which is probably one of the best ways of interacting with the people there and know the culture and mentality of the people bottom up.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Spencer.Smith)
    I don't understand this part. What do you mean by that? I mean the JET scheme allows you to play teacher teaching actual Japanese kids English, which is probably one of the best ways of interacting with the people there and know the culture and mentality of the people bottom up.
    JET is solid programme, I'm having a go at the eikaiwa industry. Who are freaking awful.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaijin)
    JET is solid programme, I'm having a go at the eikaiwa industry. Who are freaking awful.
    Oh ok.... but they are private... so may not allow you to experience the "real" student life in Japan
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Came across a very nice website/advertisement:

    http://www.mitsubishi-mitekara.com/flash/index.html

    Just let the thing run... the host would go on to talk for about 2 minutes. I must say this is the best online advertisement I have seen ever. Haha it is so good that I want to buy a car from her...
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Spencer.Smith)
    Came across a very nice website/advertisement:

    http://www.mitsubishi-mitekara.com/flash/index.html

    Just let the thing run... the host would go on to talk for about 2 minutes. I must say this is the best online advertisement I have seen ever. Haha it is so good that I want to buy a car from her...
    omg thanks mate this sites brilliant *-*
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by N_n_N)
    omg thanks mate this sites brilliant *-*
    Haha that advertisement is simply brilliant !!!!! And the host is very pretty! :p:
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I wonder if anyone could help - I'm getting conflicting views from various learning sites on whether to use 'ga' or '(w)o' as object particles in sentences - some sites solely use wo: nihongo o hanasemasu
    whereas some use ga: nihongo ga hanasemasu

    I've taken to using 'ga' as it's generally easier to say in a sentence but is there a set time when you use one or the other?

    Arigatou x
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaijin)
    Its wo を. The potential form nearly always takes wo in this sense.

    If you say; 日本語がはなせます。 You are saying 'The Japanese Language can speak', because you are stating that the Nihongo is the subject and therefore carries out the action of the verb and not receiving it.

    Therefore; 日本語をはなせます。 suggests that '(something) can speak the Japanese language.'

    A more fuller sentence would be; 外人日本語はなせます (foreigners can speak Japanese.) Notice how the particles play a role in the sentence and what their function is.

    Hope this helps.
    Gaijin... this is at odds with what I learn...

    From my textbook:
    -----------------------------------------------------------
    With potential verbs, use particle が/は instead of を/は

    日本料理 食べる --- I eat Japanese food.
    (にほんりょうり たべる)

    日本料理 食べられる ----- I can eat Japanese food.
    (にほんりょうり たべられる )
    --------------------------------------
    (Then a bit further down, there is this EXACT example...
    -----------------------------------
    日本語 話せる/話せます (I'm able to speak Japanese.)
    にほんご はなせる/はなせます


    -----------------------

    イギリス is such a poor representation of Britain (or United Kingdom) for that matter, because it is a direct translation of the word "England". I personally feel that 英国 (えいこく) is more appropriate, not least because there is at least the 国 there to indicate that it is a country ...
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Spencer.Smith)
    Gaijin... this is at odds with what I learn...

    ....
    Yes you are right. I only realised it was the potential half-way through the post and not polite and changed it without looking. Wo wouldn't be used because the action has not taken place, and therefore is describing the state and not the action.

    My notes actually say this, but I read it wrong. I've stupidly wrote it in a way that can be misconstrued if you glance at them.

    It pays to check.

    イギリス is such a poor representation of Britain (or United Kingdom) for that matter, because it is a direct translation of the word "England". I personally feel that 英国 (えいこく) is more appropriate, not least because there is at least the 国 there to indicate that it is a country ...
    フランス
    ドイツ
    イタリア

    Its all good in the hood. Eigoku can be deemed somewhat arcahic nowadays anyway.
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Ok gaijin.

    Btw... I used to not know how to type を because in my textbook it is romanised as o and you know when you type o the お appears. Haha but since you use wo in your post now I know...

    Also, for anyone who's interested the long dash (ー) in Katakana can be typed by pressing -. The dot (・) in katakana can be typed by pressing /.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I love Japan and everything about it! Can I join? =D

    私は日本語を少し話せますよ。毎週日本語のレッソンをしています。大 学の後で、
    必ず日本に旅行するつもりですよ

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: September 2, 2014
New on TSR

GCSE mocks revision

Talk study tips this weekend

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.