Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Gold dofe help

Announcements Posted on
TSR's new app is coming! Sign up here to try it first >> 17-10-2016
    • Thread Starter

    If anybody that has completed their gold dofe could help me out that would be great, thanks

    - Did you take your phone with you for the expedition?

    - How did you cope mentally?

    - Did you get blisters, if so how did you fix up your feet?

    - Any kit advice, or general advice?


    Gold Dof E kit help

    if you have done bronze and silver DofE then you should know many tips how to do it but in not here is some ideas of what to bring.

    FOOTWEAR - get boots with ankle support and with a tongue that is a continuous strip of fabric (so their are no gaps along the edges of the tongue) those of you who own these will know what i mean, this way the water will never get into the boots until it overflows the top of the boots. This saved me on D of E as i was the only one by the end with completely dry feet. Also flip-flops are a must have, light weight, doesn't matter if they get wet and are easy to slip on and off as there are no laces to deal with.

    CLOTHING - take one spare change of clothes (its better to be safe than sorry) and a pair of socks for each day, i know this may sound extravagent but the worst thing is to have wet feet whilst walking. You may want to invest in waterproof socks especially when on somewhere like Dartmoor. Always take gloves and a hat as most of your heat is lost through your head, i also took a snood as this will help you when its very windy.

    SLEEPING BAG - sadly the best and smallest sleeping bags are often the most expensive. If possible always opt for a 'down' sleeping bag as they are super warm and compact to a smaller size - mountain warehouse often have a sale on and i managed to get an 'Everest' (goes down to -27 degrees) for a decent amount.

    ROLL MAT - i used to use a foam roll mat for both bronze and silver and it was good but bulky. So for gold i have splashed out with the money and bought a much smaller compact self inflating mat that i can keep inside my bag (it also means its not wet).

    FOOD - as always eat the heaviest stuff first. Chocolate and sugary snacks aren't a bad idea as they do contain energy and a really nice to eat but its a good idea to bring snack bars to give you long lasting energy. (and.always.bring.dried.mango). An alternative to cup-a-soups and all those horrible meals we have at lunch are wraps (hear me out...) wraps are fairly light weight and fillings like laughing cow cheese and some versions of salami type meat can keep several days and this also means you don't have to boil water. We weigh all our food before we go and evenly distribute it between the team as it is very heavy.FIRST AID KIT - check all the dates before you go (even bandages have expiry dates). Must haves include: bug spray, blister plasters, paracitamol, and deep heat cream.

    In terms of all the extra little things to buy these help:
    Travel towels - fold up tiny (but it will mostly be used for drying up, not drying yourself!)
    Fold up toothbrush - stops the bristles getting horrible and make it smaller
    Don't bother with washing your hair its impossible
    Wet wipes - best way to clean yourself

    BUY TWO SURVIVAL BAGS - one to keep for emergencies and one to line your pack with (you don't want the inside of your pack to be wet) as they are completely waterproof.
    Small dry bags are also good to separate all your bits and pieces in to. i.e. one for toiletries one for food etc and they can be different colours to help your differentiate whats in the bag.

    WATER PURIFICATION - we all know how bad water purification tablets taste so i would recommend boiling as much water as possible in the evening and morning and filling up all the water bottles, this way you won't need to use purification tables. By having a cold lunch (not cooking) you won't need to spend the time boiling water and you don't need to refill your water bottles as much.

    You can only take a phone as an "emergency' phone, it must be sealed in a plastic bag and taped (so you can't just play on it).

    (Original post by UNDECIDEDFUTURE)
    - Did you take your phone with you for the expedition?
    Phones didn't exist when I did mine. But being out and about is about self reliance. Most of the remote areas in this country don't have a signal anyway and there is a risk your phone may get wet or damaged. Leave it at home and let your teachers worry about calling help if you don't make your planned way points.

    [QUOTE=UNDECIDEDFUTURE;66563210] - How did you cope mentally?/QUOTE]

    Is there anything mentally challenging about covering 50 miles in 4 days? Just keep putting one foot in front of the other and help each other out. Time keeping was our biggest problem and we spent an hour or so each evening replanning our timings based on the previous days learning.

    (Original post by UNDECIDEDFUTURE)
    - Did you get blisters, if so how did you fix up your feet?
    Whatever you do, don't buy new boots for a 4 day hike. Make sure your boots are well broken in. I have often got blisters. My personal remedy is to burst the blister and let the juices run out. Then let my foot dry out. Taking plenty of clear dry socks and maybe some sandals / trainers to wear in the evening can help keep your feet dry. Others choose those compeed plasters but I find them bulky and because your blister is still full of liquid - painful.

    (Original post by UNDECIDEDFUTURE)
    - Any kit advice, or general advice
    Take dried foods rather than cans or ready meals that are ready hydrated to save weight. A one litre plastic bottle is cheaper and better than some of the heavier purpose made bottles. Pack flapjack instead of chocolate bars. Super-noodles are a very good way to start the day! If no one is looking, no one needs to know if you went into a shop / pub to restock. Also, bin liners are not waterproof. I found the best way to waterproof my rucksack was to line it with a bivy bag and then put everything in carrier bags in the bivy bag.

    Good luck and enjoy!
Write a reply…


Submit reply


Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: August 12, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Do you like sleeping in a cold room?
Useful resources
Bizarre things students have spent their loans onThings you should budget for at uni

Sponsored features:

Making money from your own website

Need some cash?

How to make money running your own website.

Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

Handle your digital footprint

What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.