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If a federal republic is required to save the UK

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    (Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
    The monarchy, and the type of Britain we have, is inextricably linked to the post imperial malaise and the ultra conservatism as found in home counties England.
    No it's not. Britain is far from small-c conservative, it's an evolving and changing country in a way that few in the world are. As far as "post-imperial" nonsense: I was born decades after there was any semblance of the Empire. It's about as relevant to my daily activity as the Battle of Waterloo or picking a side in the War of the Roses. To suggest it somehow defines my British identity is rubbish.

    It is also inextricably linked to our conception of Britain, regional divides and inequality. This and the political culture that surround it and its accoutrements (Class consciousness, nay, obsession in general)
    I don't think regional divides have anything to do with Britain, nor do I believe class consciousness is a particularly concerning issue.

    My second point is this. Whether you agree or not with the model or not, if it were necessary to preserve the union- I think unionist Scots, and Welsh and a lot of the North and London would go for it. Clearly the conservative type counties of England are the biggest barrier to it, and they are politically powerful.

    Where are you from, and would you support it if it saved the union. I am asking a hypothetical, please appreciate that.
    A hypothetical based on a nonsense assumption. Virtually all parts of the United Kingdom are pro-monarchy.

    Quite what federalism or republicanism have to do with any of the issues you've highlighted, I really don't know.
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    (Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
    Well obviously thicko, since you are trying to be condescending, we will start from the point that I don't believe a contradiction...to spell it out, I don't believe the union will fragment via a republic, since a federal republic is more conducive to keeping Scotland in the UK
    No it isn't. The monarchy is one of the ties that bind the UK together and is overwhelmingly popular in Scotland. As for federalism - we already have an arrangement or greater autonomy in Scotland than most federal countries - what England chooses to do in terms of its own internal governance is of very little interest really. Needless to say, constitutional tinkering will not win a single supporter for the British union.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    No it's not. Britain is far from small-c conservative, it's an evolving and changing country in a way that few in the world are. As far as "post-imperial" nonsense: I was born decades after there was any semblance of the Empire. It's about as relevant to my daily activity as the Battle of Waterloo or picking a side in the War of the Roses. To suggest it somehow defines my British identity is rubbish.



    I don't think regional divides have anything to do with Britain, nor do I believe class consciousness is a particularly concerning issue.



    A hypothetical based on a nonsense assumption. Virtually all parts of the United Kingdom are pro-monarchy.

    Quite what federalism or republicanism have to do with any of the issues you've highlighted, I really don't know.
    I didn't say Britain was, I said a portion of it was, where power and money lies, and this perpetuates a cultural and political divide, as regards other parts of the UK. The home counties are very very different to Scotland, and the likes of Liverpool are very different to both. And it is still, a deeply conservative and incurious place.

    As for the post-imperial thing, I was talking in terms of the direction we've taken in terms of governance and the EU and the US, and the level of control the US has exerted, plus the fact that the monarchy is a major part of what makes people proud and acts as a continual smokescreen for what we are in real modern geopolitical terms.

    Regional divides are massive economically, again this is an English issue though. Class consciousness is, as Orwell said, more prevalent here than anywhere. It's less of an issue but it tied to the economics and the traditions.

    Where is the data for 'pro-monarchism'? I don't think the likes of Liverpool, Manchester and Glasgow are remotely pro-Monarchist.
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    People in Manchester aren't particularly passionate about the Monarchy one way or the other in my experience, from the time I've spent studying or working in Greater Manchester I can't remember one conversation about it one way or the other.

    He Unionist(historically Protestant) parts of Glasgow are probably some of, if not the strongest areas of support in the UK.
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    (Original post by SaucissonSecCy)
    I didn't say Britain was, I said a portion of it was, where power and money lies, and this perpetuates a cultural and political divide, as regards other parts of the UK. The home counties are very very different to Scotland, and the likes of Liverpool are very different to both. And it is still, a deeply conservative and incurious place.
    The home counties are not all that dissimilar from Giffnock, Morningside or Bearsden. Scotland is a pretty large and varied place. Many parts of Scotland are far more conservative than the home counties.

    Where is the data for 'pro-monarchism'? I don't think the likes of Liverpool, Manchester and Glasgow are remotely pro-Monarchist.
    You'll probably hear God Save the Queen sung more in Glasgow than any other city in Britain - albeit largely to piss off the Irish Catholic population. Still, You'll never find polling data at that level of granularity. The monarchy is still overwhelmingly popular across all regions of Great Britain though.
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    The whole of the OP relies on a fundamentally flawed premise: the that union is at risk in the first place. Given that Scotland is showing no signs of wanting to leave that rules them out. Northern Ireland is maintaining it's secession support all the way down at 20%, and nowhere else do people even bother getting polled the support is so weak.

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