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Hydrogen peroxide and fruit juice

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    Would hydrogen peroxide and fruit juice together give oxygen?




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    (Original post by Mme_Bonii)
    Does hydrogen peroxide and fruit juice together give oxygen? *

    [/SIZE]
    Have just looked at the ingredients of fruit juice and I cannot a combination of them with hydrogen peroxide which would lead to oxygen.*

    May I ask you why did you think those reactants would come to oxygen? *
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Have just looked at the ingredients of fruit juice and I cannot a combination of them with hydrogen peroxide which would lead to oxygen.*

    May I ask you why did you think those reactants would come to oxygen? *
    *
    From what I've studied yesterday, all cells of the living have a catalyst called catalase which catalyses hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen.

    So when I found this question that asks what would be observed when fruit juice (fresh, natural) is poured to hydrogen peroxide. I figured it'd give oxygen although I'm not sure, is a fruit still alive after it has been separated from a tree?


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    (Original post by Mme_Bonii)
    From what I've studied yesterday, all cells of the living have a catalyst called catalase which catalyses hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen.

    So when I found this question that asks what would be observed when fruit juice (fresh, natural) is poured to hydrogen peroxide. I figured it'd give oxygen although I'm not sure, is a fruit still alive after it has been separated from a tree?


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    I'd assume that if you got some pure catalase enzyme and added hydrogen peroxide it would catalyse it (assuming that the enzyme was not denatured). The only issue I would think is whether you have enough of the enzyme to see it.

    I believe that H2O2 normally decomposes into water and oxygen but at very slow rates, and from a quick internet search apparently pouring it onto a cut produces oxygen because of the presence of catalase. One issue you might have is that orange juice is quite acidic, but I can't find much information on the optimum pH for orange catalase - so it might be denatured and not work.

    Edit: As for whether a fruit is still alive after being separated from the tree, if you've ever listened to the Infinite Monkey Cage that comes up quite often.
    Edit2: I haven't found an optimum pH for a citrus fruit catalase, but I have found references to it being quite low, so it might not be broken down. I guess you might just have to try it!
    Edit 3: Just found this - http://www.math.unl.edu/~jump/Center...20Activity.pdf - if you go onto page 4 it has the teachers notes for a similar experiment - potatoes instead of fruits, but I'd assume it would be similar.
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    (Original post by ThatPerson2)
    I'd assume that if you got some pure catalase enzyme and added hydrogen peroxide it would catalyse it (assuming that the enzyme was not denatured). The only issue I would think is whether you have enough of the enzyme to see it.

    I believe that H2O2 normally decomposes into water and oxygen but at very slow rates, and from a quick internet search apparently pouring it onto a cut produces oxygen because of the presence of catalase. One issue you might have is that orange juice is quite acidic, but I can't find much information on the optimum pH for orange catalase - so it might be denatured and not work.

    Edit: As for whether a fruit is still alive after being separated from the tree, if you've ever listened to the Infinite Monkey Cage that comes up quite often.
    Edit2: I haven't found an optimum pH for a citrus fruit catalase, but I have found references to it being quite low, so it might not be broken down. I guess you might just have to try it!
    Edit 3: Just found this - http://www.math.unl.edu/~jump/Center...20Activity.pdf - if you go onto page 4 it has the teachers notes for a similar experiment - potatoes instead of fruits, but I'd assume it would be similar.
    Thank you so much for the info!
    I recently got a hold of some H2O2 and I'm going to give it a try.



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    (Original post by Mme_Bonii)
    Thank you so much for the info!
    I recently got a hold of some H2O2 and I'm going to give it a try.



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    Good luck with it! Do come back and say if it worked, I'm quite interested in it now!

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