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Do you think uni fees should be reduced for students who delay going to university?

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    There's an article from the Guardian called "Why do we steer so many 18-year-olds towards university before they are ready?". It suggests that students who choose to delay their decision to go to uni (to work, take a gap year etc) should pay reduced fees for their education - if they decide to go to uni at an older age.

    This autumn, more new students are expected to enrol at UK universities than ever before. The rise is a reflection not only of young people doing better at school but of universities taking more students...They have to, or their incomes will fall.
    Today’s young adults are rarely advised to take a year or two out to work and make sure they want to go to university. While it’s in the short-term interests of both schools and universities for most to go straight away, it’s not in the interests of students themselves.
    One sensible way to cut fees would be to reduce them first for young adults who delay going to university. The later you go, the less you owe. And the richest adults should pay the cost through decent taxation, as their children – whose tuition fees they have been able to pay upfront – are able to avoid loans.
    1. Do you think it's better to go to uni straight out of school or take a couple of years out to think about your options?

    2. Do you agree that "the later you go, the less you owe?"?
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    I don't agree at all. Why should someone who chooses to uni later pay less? You're penalising those who know at 18 what they want to do.
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    (Original post by Alisaurus Cats)
    There's an article from the Guardian called "Why do we steer so many 18-year-olds towards university before they are ready?". It suggests that students who choose to delay their decision to go to uni (to work, take a gap year etc) should pay reduced fees for their education - if they decide to go to uni at an older age.
    In many ways this is a very Guardian story. The government knows best and should a pricing mechanism to manipulate people's educational choices.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I don't agree at all. Why should someone who chooses to uni later pay less? You're penalising those who know at 18 what they want to do.
    I'm not sure how I feel about it. I agree that some people go to uni for the wrong reasons and broadening horizons for young people can only be positive.

    I do think it would be very hard to put into action and inevitably some groups would be marginalised of feel disenfranchised. So perhaps incentivising students to better explore their options might have a stronger impact than this tiered approach.

    Having said all of that, the end of the article points towards free education for all which is something I personally do agree with
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    I read that article and I thought it made a lot of very good points. However, I do not agree with the conclusion that those who decide to defer university should pay less. University should be equally accessible to everyone.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I read that article and I thought it made a lot of very good points. However, I do not agree with the conclusion that those who decide to defer university should pay less. University should be equally accessible to everyone.
    This

    And agreed on the article - good thought-piece material
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    I haven't read the article, but seeing as the paying back of your student loan now stops at 50 (iirc) then surely those who go later end up paying less back, so therefore get a cheaper degree anyway?

    Seeing as the price of a degree is going up so much now, it's unlikely that many people will even pay off the whole of their degree anyway.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I read that article and I thought it made a lot of very good points. However, I do not agree with the conclusion that those who decide to defer university should pay less. University should be equally accessible to everyone.
    University would be equally accessible. The price changes, not the selection.

    I am however against that sort of politics as it could lead to other kinds of separate pricing, such as reduced price for BME, or women, etc.
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    I don't agree that those who go later should pay less.

    But I also strongly dislike the pressure that young people feel, to go to university straight after their A-levels.
    People feel pressurised into going straight into uni, even if they aren't entirely sure the course is right for them. If you take some time out and really give it some consideration, I feel you are more likely to make the right choice for you. Too many people choose courses that in hindsight they wouldn't have. And I blame that on the panic they feel into applying straight away, before they've had time to actually think about their career choice.

    Young people also feel pressured into applying through clearing and studying at a university or course that they wouldn't have chosen themselves, or they won't end up happy in, because they feel the immense pressure to go to uni straight away. Whereas if they took a year out, they'd have time to rethink their options, properly look into the universities and apply to ones they're genuinely interested in.

    I think partly that is down to pushy families/ schools and their expectations, and partly down to not wanting to miss out, a kind of conformist pressure to want to go to uni the same time your schoolmates go.


    In the long term, that year and a bit out will make no difference. What does make a difference however, is rushing into choosing an entire degree that is not right for you. Choosing to spend three years in a location which is not suited to you. That can have a much more detrimental effect on your life than taking some time out before uni.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    University would be equally accessible. The price changes, not the selection.

    I am however against that sort of politics as it could lead to other kinds of separate pricing, such as reduced price for BME, or women, etc.
    Why would it lead to reduced prices for women? I'm pretty sure more women attend university than males...
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    Don't forget it was Labour who decided that 50% of all school leavers should go to university, increasing pressures on universities and ultimately allowing for increased fees. As a country we don't need that many graduates.

    As to differential pricing of degrees - no, of course not. What other product or service operates on that basis?
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    Well having the price of university tuition rising in a series of huge jolts as it has in recent history makes it look like something you should commit to at the earliest opportunity to avoid paying a lot more for the same thing in a few years... it's probably not a decisive factor tbh but now that we're getting near the real price of tuition I think it probably should be inflation locked.
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    1. depends upon how prepared you are academically and emotionally. some are ready to go, whereas other may benefit from an internship / or experience like operation raleigh.

    2. obviously not. why should the prepared and efficient pay more?
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    As to differential pricing of degrees - no, of course not. What other product or service operates on that basis?
    Lots of financial products change their cost depending on when you buy them in life e.g. insurance and assurance.

    Accessing savings accounts perhaps (when you get penalised)? So the longer you delay the more money you get.

    I know it's not relevant to the core argument but there are examples.
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    (Original post by Fox Corner)
    I haven't read the article, but seeing as the paying back of your student loan now stops at 50 (iirc) then surely those who go later end up paying less back, so therefore get a cheaper degree anyway?

    Seeing as the price of a degree is going up so much now, it's unlikely that many people will even pay off the whole of their degree anyway.
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    Foxy...you always win at "fair points"
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    Will need to read the article to see the justification in price reduction.

    Lots of courses have a high drop out rate and that is wasteful for students getting into debt.

    I would be in favour of a lot more careers counseling so young people make the decision of going to uni a lot more carefull including whether it was worth it at all and what value different courses might have. A lot of people could be better off by taking a different path.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Why would it lead to reduced prices for women? I'm pretty sure more women attend university than males...
    They are still disadvantaged later in life, so I can see some people asking for that.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I don't agree at all. Why should someone who chooses to uni later pay less? You're penalising those who know at 18 what they want to do.
    I believe we should be encouraging, people to go straight to uni after they finish there a levels and this is in my view encouraging gap years. Although gap years may be important, I don't think people should be rewarded for having an extended holiday
    Peace
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    (Original post by iloveepq123)
    I believe we should be encouraging, people to go straight to uni after they finish there a levels and this is in my view encouraging gap years. Although gap years may be important, I don't think people should be rewarded for having an extended holiday

    Peace
    Why? See my post above.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Lots of financial products change their cost depending on when you buy them in life e.g. insurance and assurance.

    Accessing savings accounts perhaps (when you get penalised)? So the longer you delay the more money you get.

    I know it's not relevant to the core argument but there are examples.
    But there's a difference in that insurance is priced according to individual risk factors and amount of useful life remaining. No-one is going to set student fees based on individual circumstances and predicted future career trajectory.

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