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Comp sci vs Econ

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    currently study economics, philosophy and sociology at a level. I'm scared that I'll go into a cs course and find it too challenging as I've never really coded before + would I be at a disadvantage as I don't take maths
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    yes
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    I was in the same situation and went with Economics, i think although unis say they teach from scratch it would still be insanely difficult, even if the math part isn't that hard. I think same would apply for you based on your A levels, you'll be suited to a Econ course, preferably with not to much maths as this will feel more like a traditional subject to you (Notes from textbook and lectures) rather than lots of CS tutorials and coding.

    I have talked to CS students before and they say they're fine without the maths, but they are generally the ones who are still strong with coding and took A level computing normally.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    I was in the same situation and went with Economics, i think although unis say they teach from scratch it would still be insanely difficult, even if the math part isn't that hard. I think same would apply for you based on your A levels, you'll be suited to a Econ course, preferably with not to much maths as this will feel more like a traditional subject to you (Notes from textbook and lectures) rather than lots of CS tutorials and coding.

    I have talked to CS students before and they say they're fine without the maths, but they are generally the ones who are still strong with coding and took A level computing normally.
    Bsc or BA?
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    (Original post by Simonpanteli)
    Bsc or BA?
    I choose a BA at Leicester, but could still have done BSC at Lougborough, they don't require A level maths. Also Newcastle and many other top unis don't require it if you want to go still for the BSC
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    CompSci wins every, single, time.


    Re: your Q, no there are a fair number of solid CS programmes that don't require A-level maths. But were you to apply to say any of the top 10-15 programmes, then yes, you would 100% need Maths. The coding etc, will be taught from an introductory level - don't worry.


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    CompSci wins every, single, time.


    Re: your Q, no there are a fair number of solid CS programmes that don't require A-level maths. But were you to apply to say any of the top 10-15 programmes, then yes, you would 100% need Maths. The coding etc, will be taught from an introductory level - don't worry.


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    I only achieved a b in GCSE maths would it not be challenging to study cs at a university such as Sussex or UEA(they don't require a level maths )
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    Economics is better imo, but you would probably be better off if you did maths at a level
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    (Original post by Simonpanteli)
    I only achieved a b in GCSE maths would it not be challenging to study cs at a university such as Sussex or UEA(they don't require a level maths )
    Nope, not if you're reasonably logical.

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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Economics is better imo, but you would probably be better off if you did maths at a level
    Allow your econ promoting

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    lol computer science, you can learn to code without a degree in it
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    lol computer science, you can learn to code without a degree in it
    lol economics, doesn't qualify you for sweet F all.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    lol economics, doesn't qualify you for sweet F all.

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    Yes it's multidisciplinary and wide scoping, and there's a correlation with top economics degree holders earning high paying jobs.

    Computer science grads on the other hand have the highest unemployment rate. lol.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    Yes it's multidisciplinary and wide scoping, and there's a correlation with top economics degree holders earning high paying jobs.

    Computer science grads on the other hand have the highest unemployment rate. lol.
    LOOOL 'correlation'.

    Yeah, but as you can see from statistics at various universities they also have one of the highest straight into employment rates and highest professional job vs nonprofessional job rates, way more than Econ anyway. Sorry dude, econ can't compare

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    (Original post by fksociety)
    Yes it's multidisciplinary and wide scoping, and there's a correlation with top economics degree holders earning high paying jobs.

    Computer science grads on the other hand have the highest unemployment rate. lol.
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOOOL 'correlation'.Yeah, but as you can see from statistics at various universities they also have one of the highest straight into employment rates and highest professional job vs nonprofessional job rates, way more than Econ anyway. Sorry dude, econ can't compare Posted from TSR Mobile
    Tender topics I see
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    There's literally no point in doing computer science, when there's an Indian right around the corner who's better than you at it.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOOOL 'correlation'.

    Yeah, but as you can see from statistics at various universities they also have one of the highest straight into employment rates and highest professional job vs nonprofessional job rates, way more than Econ anyway. Sorry dude, econ can't compare

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    Yes Correlation, i didnt want to trigger you by saying that economics is where the money is at

    but but but... It doesnt change the fact that it still has the highest unemployment rates! Sorry mate, Computer science just isn't up there with economics.
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    (Original post by Carthaginian)
    There's literally no point in doing computer science, when there's an Indian right around the corner who's better than you at it.
    Everyone says this, but it's not true. Outsourcing is generally for automated, simple problems and not the type of complex computational problems a real software engineer has to tackle.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Everyone says this, but it's not true. Outsourcing is generally for automated, simple problems and not the type of complex computational problems a real software engineer has to tackle.

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    The thing is you're directly linking computer science with software engineering when in reality does computer science even actually prep you for these sorts of jobs? it seeems like to me anyone who practises programming and builds a portfolio, even with an economics degree is fine. It's not like a CS degree produces the 'perfect' software engineer cause many CS students don't even like like programming.

    Whereas Economics doesn't prepare you for one specific discipline but gives you the skills for a range. True with CS, but who would go through the degree anyway without the intention of going into a computing profession
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    The thing is you're directly linking computer science with software engineering when in reality does computer science even actually prep you for these sorts of jobs? it seeems like to me anyone who practises programming and builds a portfolio, even with an economics degree is fine. It's not like a CS degree produces the 'perfect' software engineer cause many CS students don't even like like programming.

    Whereas Economics doesn't prepare you for one specific discipline but gives you the skills for a range. True with CS, but who would go through the degree anyway without the intention of going into a computing profession
    Well I mean you code and make coursework projects... If you were to capitalise on what you've done you'd be in a perfect position for a software gig, and as most grad jobs are nonspecific you're both doing a degree that opens up all the generalist career routes as well as more technical specialist careers where a CS degree is not just helpful but is often a requirement.

    A CS degree is a coupling of theoretical concepts and practical applications - you're well positioned given the exposure to rigorous maths and logic to develop a broad skillset.

    IMO, an econ degree is good if you want to just do an academic degree and you enjoy economics, but it's not quite as varied (both careers wise and generally) as CompSci or Engineering would be.*

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