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Cambridge Maths Students and Applicants

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    (Original post by around)
    the idea being that second guessing people's intentions is an important transferrable skill and has to be taught somewhere in the course?
    This was discussed at the last Faculty Board meeting. The Part III committee recommended that the rubrics not be published because they think that some students might drop whole sections of a course if they know that they're going to have to answer, say, 3 out of 5 questions on an exam. But the FB disagreed and the possibility of rubrics being published on the Faculty website prior to exams is being looked into (maybe even for this year, but certainly next year), so watch this space...
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    (Original post by nuodai)
    This was discussed at the last Faculty Board meeting. The Part III committee recommended that the rubrics not be published because they think that some students might drop whole sections of a course if they know that they're going to have to answer, say, 3 out of 5 questions on an exam. But the FB disagreed and the possibility of rubrics being published on the Faculty website prior to exams is being looked into (maybe even for this year, but certainly next year), so watch this space...
    The Part III committee's argument seems very strange. If they want students to study all sections of a course, why not examine them on them all? E.g. have every paper contain 5 questions all with the same weight, and answer as many as you like. On one 2011 paper students were marked on 3 questions - I don't recall out of how many, but think there were only 3 on the paper - and each was worth 40% of the mark. I've never seen an exam like that before. In effect you were marked on 2.5 questions out of 3. Maybe a case of giving lecturers too much freedom and independence?
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    (Original post by lopterton)
    The Part III committee's argument seems very strange. If they want students to study all sections of a course, why not examine them on them all? E.g. have every paper contain 5 questions all with the same weight, and answer as many as you like. On one 2011 paper students were marked on 3 questions - I don't recall out of how many, but think there were only 3 on the paper - and each was worth 40% of the mark. I've never seen an exam like that before. In effect you were marked on 2.5 questions out of 3. Maybe a case of giving lecturers too much freedom and independence?
    I don't think it's a problem as long as students know what to expect. And to be honest, I don't think many people really have a problem with students only revising sections of courses -- they obviously do so at their own risk anyway.
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    Has anyone here applied to sit a Part III paper on an area of their own choosing, e.g. not even on the notes of a course given in a previous year?

    If so, I'd be interested to hear your experiences. I've read Tom Körner's guide, and sitting a paper on material in a chosen book, on an area not taught at Part III, seems as if it could be amazingly useful preparation for doing a PhD.

    What kind of help do you get, or obstacles do you experience, in choosing a field, getting a paper set, and then studying the stuff?
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    Hello TSR, I really need your help! I am currently a year 11 student wanting to study mathematics at a prestigious university (Cambridge), I feel as though I have no chance even though I haven't done my A-levels. I feel confident and motivated to do well but I am afraid to face the realty of it (it's hard). Is there anything I can do to increase my chances, e.g. Extra studying materials or tutorials etc.
    If anyone with any experience or further knowledge please comment below as all will help.


    Ps: I am new to this website so please no rude or insulting feedback, thanks.
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    (Original post by 19Luke96)
    Hello TSR, I really need your help! I am currently a year 11 student wanting to study mathematics at a prestigious university (Cambridge), I feel as though I have no chance even though I haven't done my A-levels. I feel confident and motivated to do well but I am afraid to face the realty of it (it's hard). Is there anything I can do to increase my chances, e.g. Extra studying materials or tutorials etc.
    If anyone with any experience or further knowledge please comment below as all will help.

    Ps: I am new to this website so please no rude or insulting feedback, thanks.
    Hi. The first thing you need to do is to get some decent A Level textbooks, such as the 4 by Bostock and Chandler (2 pure, 2 applied). These are hugely better than the books that are published nowadays. They have tough questions at the end of each chapter, which is exactly what you need.

    I've sent you a PM with some more advice, which I hope is of some help!
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    (Original post by 19Luke96)
    Hello TSR, I really need your help! I am currently a year 11 student wanting to study mathematics at a prestigious university (Cambridge), I feel as though I have no chance even though I haven't done my A-levels. I feel confident and motivated to do well but I am afraid to face the realty of it (it's hard). Is there anything I can do to increase my chances, e.g. Extra studying materials or tutorials etc.
    If anyone with any experience or further knowledge please comment below as all will help.


    Ps: I am new to this website so please no rude or insulting feedback, thanks.
    If you want a real challenge, look at Pure Maths Vols 1 and 2 by SL Parsonson.
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    I'm interested in what sort of jobs the third years are going on to and whether my college is fairly representative: one is hoping to stay on, one is going into banking, one into software development, one planned gap year. The others are waiting till after exams to sort things out.

    I'm one of the ones without anything sorted so it would be interesting to hear what areas the mathmos from other colleges are going to.

    Comments about previous years also welcome. Thanks
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    (Original post by willt)
    I'm interested in what sort of jobs the third years are going on to and whether my college is fairly representative: one is hoping to stay on, one is going into banking, one into software development, one planned gap year. The others are waiting till after exams to sort things out.

    I'm one of the ones without anything sorted so it would be interesting to hear what areas the mathmos from other colleges are going to. Thanks.
    Of the four 3rd-years in my college, two of us are planning to stay on (or go elsewhere), one wants to be a teacher but hasn't applied for any PGCEs yet, and one is thinking of going abroad to work (probably in finance). But none of us have any concrete plans, for instance if I don't get into Part III then I'm likely to have an 'enforced gap year', of sorts.
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    (Original post by willt)
    I'm interested in what sort of jobs the third years are going on to and whether my college is fairly representative: one is hoping to stay on, one is going into banking, one into software development, one planned gap year. The others are waiting till after exams to sort things out.

    I'm one of the ones without anything sorted so it would be interesting to hear what areas the mathmos from other colleges are going to. Thanks.
    Sounds pretty similar to my college. Three of us are hoping to stay on, two have jobs sorted out: one is going into banking, one is going into software development, and the other two aren't sure/are waiting until after exams.
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    (Original post by willt)
    I'm interested in what sort of jobs the third years are going on to and whether my college is fairly representative: one is hoping to stay on, one is going into banking, one into software development, one planned gap year. The others are waiting till after exams to sort things out.

    I'm one of the ones without anything sorted so it would be interesting to hear what areas the mathmos from other colleges are going to. Thanks.
    Of the twelve remaining, I believe ten are hoping to do Part III. Banking is the other destination.
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    (Original post by willt)
    I'm interested in what sort of jobs the third years are going on to and whether my college is fairly representative: one is hoping to stay on, one is going into banking, one into software development, one planned gap year. The others are waiting till after exams to sort things out.

    I'm one of the ones without anything sorted so it would be interesting to hear what areas the mathmos from other colleges are going to.

    Comments about previous years also welcome. Thanks
    http://www.careers.cam.ac.uk/sectors/maths/fds.asp

    Of the people I knew, a couple went into banking and one to GCHQ. I didn't have anything sorted out, but now also work in banking. Most stayed on -- one switching to astrophysics, the rest doing Part III. I don't know what they've all got sorted out, but software, PhDs and GCHQ are things I've heard mentioned.
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    (Original post by harr)
    http://www.careers.cam.ac.uk/sectors/maths/fds.asp

    We had a couple going into banking and one to GCHQ. I didn't have anything sorted out, but now also work in banking. Most stayed on -- one switching to astrophysics, the rest doing Part III. I don't know what they've all got sorted out, but software, PhDs and GCHQ are things I've heard mentioned.
    Are you allowed to say that? :p:
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    (Original post by SimonM)
    Are you allowed to say that? :p:
    I'm sure HSBC wouldn't object.
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    (Original post by harr)
    I'm sure HSBC wouldn't object.
    I think he was referring to the other place with the four-letter acronym...
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    (Original post by SimonM)
    Are you allowed to say that? :p:
    Considering they came to our careers fair last year...
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    Since it's not clear. I was joking.
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    (Original post by stripy_and_nice)
    Has anyone here applied to sit a Part III paper on an area of their own choosing, e.g. not even on the notes of a course given in a previous year?

    If so, I'd be interested to hear your experiences. I've read Tom Körner's guide, and sitting a paper on material in a chosen book, on an area not taught at Part III, seems as if it could be amazingly useful preparation for doing a PhD.

    What kind of help do you get, or obstacles do you experience, in choosing a field, getting a paper set, and then studying the stuff?
    Bump! Does anyone know how this works? Or does it happen only rarely in practice?
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    Is the classification theorem for 2D closed manifolds proved anywhere in Part III? It's stated but not proved in Parts IB (Geometry) and II (Algebraic Topology and Differential Geometry).
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    (Original post by wooper)
    Is the classification theorem for 2D closed manifolds proved anywhere in Part III? It's stated but not proved in Parts IB (Geometry) and II (Algebraic Topology and Differential Geometry).
    What's the precise statement you're thinking of? I vaguely remember seeing a proof in Part II Algebraic Topology which only assumes triangulability...

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