Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Eczema - steroid cream questions

Announcements Posted on
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Heya. I've had nasty eczema on my hands for about 6 or 7 years but have never had it treated by my GP before until recently. Before christmas I was given Diprobase cream to use at night- and it worked to a certain extent but never really lasted. My hands are very very dry and red. They often bleed and by the end of the day they shrivel and I cant open and use them properly. I went back to my gp last week and she prescribed me steriod cream to use twice a day for 7 - 10 days. Whenever I mention it, people seem to say that steroid cream is bad but im not sure why. I've been on it for 2 days and it makes a difference overnight, but my hands quickly return to their old state a few hours after. Is this something that will improve during the treatment? Is it safe for me to use other creams during the day to 'top up' the moisturising? Has anyone got any tips or advice on how to get rid of this - or atleast make it a bit milder. Its really really sore and I hate bleeding over everything. When I get home at night and wash my hands they are so sore and they get relaly stiff and nasty. Any advice would be great.

    Thanks xx
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I think people worry because when people say steroid they automatically think of cancer treatments which can do horrors to your body, however all in the name of good. Steroid creams are nothing to worry about it. I think you'll be fine to use other moisturizing creams but to check i'd ring your local pharmacy for advice. They may be some over the counter treatment you can buy that may help soothe the redness.

    My really weird top tip for soothing eczema and its really weird but works for me, probably isn't good in the long run. Stick your hands under hot water as hot as you can stand but not hot enough to burn you or cause harm. It takes away the sting or something. Either way it feels good (don't shoot me for giving bad advice this really does work for me!)
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Steroid cream was the ONLY thing that worked for me. I used it for 7-10 days. A lot of people seem to hate it and think it thins your skin but that's only if you use a lot of it for a long time.

    Mine was one of the strongest one's there was...can't remember the name. I was told to apply the steroid cream once a day and then half an hour later moistourise and continue to do that during the day.

    I tried pretty much everything to get rid of mine. Steroid cream was the only thing that worked.
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    only steriod cream worked on me too. get some aquaius (sp?) cream too. it keeps the skin moist for ages.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I have exactly the same problem, my hands regularly crack and bleed everywhere, it's really painful. The skin on them gets really tight and I can't move my hands and fingers freely. I have steroid ointment that I use overnight. I slather it on and then put on some of those cotton moisturising gloves (you can get them from Avon) and sleep with them on and my hands are much better for a bit after that. I think the reason they tell you that steroid creams and ointments are bad is because they thin the skin down, so if you are using them constantly then I guess it is bad but if you just use it every few days or so it should be alright. My doctor said it was a good idea to use the steroid ointment to 'get my hands back under control,' and then use another cream he prescribed (called doublebase I think) to keep them that way. I also have aqueous cream as well which is good but quite oily.

    Another product that works well is the Norwegian hand cream I think it's neutrogena, comes in a white tube with a red lid. It's intensive and its not greasy either which I like about it. As far as I know it's perfectly fine to top up the moisture levels with other hand creams - I have to do it anyway. Try keeping handcream in the bathroom and put some on every time you wash your hands.

    Good luck with it, I know exactly how you feel, it's so frustrating and painful but perserver and it should get better. Feel free to PM me if there's anything else I can help with
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I've been using steroid creams since I was about 11/12, I am now 18. Apart from thinning the skin (in which I stop using them for a few days) they are the only thing that help with flare ups don't worry so much about what people are saying
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Steroid cream is wonderful stuff, but turns things yellow...so don't get it on your clothes.
    • 4 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/ask_the_...idcreams.shtml

    ask your doctor about possible side effects, I doubt they'd prescribe anything strong enough to cause cushing's syndrome. you're more likely to notice your skin thinning a bit though.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pepe Le Poosh)
    My really weird top tip for soothing eczema and its really weird but works for me, probably isn't good in the long run. Stick your hands under hot water as hot as you can stand but not hot enough to burn you or cause harm. It takes away the sting or something. Either way it feels good (don't shoot me for giving bad advice this really does work for me!)
    Lol i get that too. why is that? its probably really bad for the skin.

    anyway i find mixing a small part of steroid cream to larger amount of diprobase helps it absorb better
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I use steroid cream (hydrocortisone cream 0.5%) because I've got Psoriasis on my eyelids. It's very temperamental and is known to only work for a certain amount of time and then stop working. The thinning of the skin concerns me (as I already have a connective tissue disorder/collagen deficiency) but not enough for me to stop using it.

    People run screaming as soon as you mention Steroid cream, but if it works for you, then great. Don't be put off by other people's misinformation.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I've been using steriod cream for the last few years. Mainly Dermovate Nn cream, but they stopped making it, so I now use Dermovate cream when I get flare-ups. Doesn't work quite as well, but still works.

    Personally, I found the Neutragina handcream mentioned above too dry for my hands. Vaseline Intensive Care, however is awesome! and is normally enouh to keep my hands under control without needing to use the perscription cream.

    I'm not sure if you're supposed to do this, but I put on some demovate cream and intensive care cream at the same time, to 'seal' it in and keep the hands soft. It works really well for me (better than using dermovate by itself), and my doctor didn't really mind when I tol her I did it :p:
    • 2 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Use Diprobase more than once a day. And steroid cream is good - I use it for my exzema.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Steroid creams are only really an issue if you over-use them. Remember that fingertip measurements are key - so one fingertip sized blob for a WHOLE arm. If you use too much it can do more harm that good. It can thin the skin but just remember to stop using it for a period when it gets better and then start re-using again when it flares up.
    Between steroid creams use lots of emolients e.g. aqueous cream or E45 BUT beware that you can be allergic to these (I'm allergic to E45 and didn't find out for yeaaars).
    Also keep your nails short so you can't scratch too much and just try and keep your hand moisturised (keep some with you in you bag at all times).
    I agree with PleP that running my hands under warm water does take out the sting so if you HAVE to scratch do that instead. Just make sure it's warm soothing water not hot scalding water!
    Also if you only have it on your hands is there a chance you have a contact allergy? Do you wear allergy-resistant gloves when you wash-up? Do you handle harsh chemicals? Also I sometimes find taking a one-a-day anti-histamine can help reduce my eczema so maybe try that and see if it helps?
    There is no shame is eczema people! We're not lepyrs we just have uber-sensitive skin
    • Thread Starter
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Thanks so much for the adice. I think the key is just to keep moisturisig my hands as much as possible during the day, rather than just at night. I think when I get back to uni i'l try putting on cream before the start of each lecture as I wont be needing to wash my hands for a while afterwards so wont just wash it all away. I work alot with chemicals and paints and other nasty things - I dont think its the chemicals that affect my hands, its the constant hand washing - and I must admit I am a bit of a clean freak. My hands are slightly better than they were a few days ago - so i'l continue with the steroids and see what happens by next friday. They do feel a bit tender and sore so im not sure if thats the steroids - of just me imagining it.

    Im glad i'm not alone with this condition. I know that it affects alot of people but its really nice to hear from other people who suffer with it too. Up until recently I wore gloves all the time because my hands were so sore and looked really nasty. I feel really self concious of them but I hope that i'l eventually find something to cure them and not have to worry anymore.

    Thanks xx
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ilora-Danon)
    People run screaming as soon as you mention Steroid cream, but if it works for you, then great. Don't be put off by other people's misinformation.
    So true. In most cases, the thinning of skin would need a microscope to see it. It's more a warning given to people who go to the pharmacist and get HC45 without seeing a doctor for years.

    In terms of using it in conjunction with diprobase: apply diprobase and wait 10 minutes; apply steroid cream and wait 10 minutes; apply more diprobase. When I got eczema on my hands, I had to use betamethasone for the first week rather than hydrocortisone to get it under control. In terms of side effects, a stronger steroid for a shorter period of time is better than a weaker steroid for longer, so if it's been a week or two and the hydrocortisone hasn't worked, go and get some betamethasone - it'll clear it up faster and more safely.

    The key thing once it's under control is your maintenance therapy: switch to once a day of steroid + diprobase and once a day of diprobase; then replace the steroid with a weaker one; then (fingers crossed) switch to diprobase twice daily as a monotherapy. Any flare ups, jump on them as soon as there's the first sign of itching - a couple of applications of betamethasone knocks any minor hand flare-ups I get on the head, I don't wait for it to get bad any more.

    Otherwise, the usual stuff: wash your hands using moisturiser instead of soap (seriously); and keep your fingernails short.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepgirl)
    its the constant hand washing - and I must admit I am a bit of a clean freak.
    Just spotted this - importantly, use moisturiser instead of soap to wash your hands. It does the same - clears the crap off your hands - but without drying the skin. If you can't bring yourself to do this, wash with whatever it is you use at the moment, then pat dry (not rub), and moisturise. Diprobase is available in little handy-sized tubes as well as the pump-action dispenser, ideal for when out and about.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Look up Tamanu oil. It is natural and really helps. I do use on my kids . Good luck.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    strong bump
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepgirl)
    Whenever I mention it, people seem to say that steroid cream is bad but im not sure why. I've been on it for 2 days and it makes a difference overnight, but my hands quickly return to their old state a few hours after. Is this something that will improve during the treatment? Is it safe for me to use other creams during the day to 'top up' the moisturising? Has anyone got any tips or advice on how to get rid of this - or atleast make it a bit milder.
    Firstly, who do you trust more - your friends or your GP?
    If you choose your friends, get a new GP.

    Secondly, who do you trust more, this forum filled with 90% social inept people, or your GP?

    in short: Ask these questions to your GP, it doesn't take long.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I have been using steroid creams since I was around 3 and I am now 18. I have 6 different creams at the moment - dermovate eumovate elocon elidel hydrocortisone bethamethasone. Its only bad for you if you apply loads everyday for weeks. It can make your skin thinner but thats only if they are misused

    Posted from TSR Mobile

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: December 1, 2013
New on TSR

The future of apprenticeships

Join the discussion in the apprenticeships hub!

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.