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What's the real difference between Labour and the Conservatives?

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    With their policies becoming increasingly similar, with more central views, the difference seems to be getting less distinct between the two parties...apart from their candidates, of course. Put it down to my ignorance, perhaps, but it's certainly not as obvious as it once was; Labour is no longer the 'working class' party, and Conservatives aren't just for the 'upper classes' or wealthy businessmen....the stereotypes of a typical Labour/Conservative voter that once existed, rather unfairly maybe, just don't seem to be prevalent anymore (apart from the fact that many people that used to vote Labour for example, will carry on doing so out of tradition/built up loyalty and distrust of Conservatives over their former 'snobbish' perception by many).

    What would you say are the main differences, if any?
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    The main differences have less to do with actual policy, due to mutual copying, and more to do with ideals, demographics and party roots.
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    It's the whole Giant Douche Vs Turd Sandwich thing all over again

    Apart from that, probably very little. Mainly just who votes for them. I agree with your statement that a lot of people just vote out of loyalty.

    I think the divide is more 'incumbent' Vs 'opposition' in all situations.
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    One have policies, some good and some bad. The other are a PR company.
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    Both Labour and the Conservatives have moved away from overt ideology and towards a degree of pragmatic populism.

    Just as labour never really talk about socialism any more so the conservatives show little inclination for the ideological rhetoric associated with the Thatcher era. In my view this is in large measure a result of Britain having experienced a relatively long period of uninterrupted prosperity and where there is no stomach to 'fix what ain't broke' (though obviously the parties can't publicly acknowledge this state of affairs). Should there be a major economic or social crisis (and they usually coincide) distance is likely to appear and more pointed ideological rhetoric.
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    Whilst Labour have changed economically, they have not changed their social policy. They still want to intervene in every aspect of the individual's private life.
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    (Original post by Overground)
    One have policies, some good and some bad.
    I had to laugh at this! Which policies would fit under the former category in your opinion?:confused:
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    (Original post by Mrgd291190)
    It's the whole Giant Douche Vs Turd Sandwich thing all over again


    But which one is which? :confused:



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    One is meant for working class and other is meant for old, backward minded people.
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    (Original post by Skipper)
    I had to laugh at this! Which policies would fit under the former category in your opinion?:confused:
    Reclassifying cannabis, 10p tax band, ratifying the Lisbon Treaty to name some recent ones. I'm not defending all of these, that's for another thread.
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    Anglo-American links have become very close, largely under the Blair era, to an extent that we waged what many believe to be a -and i say this cautiously- 'pointless' war against Iraq, in the name of terror. Excuse my ignorance, but was Britain a real terror target before its alliance with America in the war? I think not. It was Ossama's war with America; NOT Britain.
    In your opinion, given the similarities between the parties now, would a Conservative Government have taken the same steps? :p:
    In my humble, albeit ill informed opinion, this is where the differences will really begin to manifest themselves.
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    Labour's introduction of the minimum wage is something that I and members of my family have greatly benefitted from and which, I'll not forget, the tories opposed. I know which side my bread is buttered on!
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    (Original post by rnshan)
    One is meant for working class and other is meant for old, backward minded people.
    Funny how most Labour MPs are middle-class then, isn't it?
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    Labour's introduction of the minimum wage is something that I and members of my family have greatly benefitted from and which, I'll not forget, the tories opposed. I know which side my bread is buttered on!
    and so do the Tories :p:
    Traditionally, most Conservative support has being centred in areas of London, and largely in the South East....areas where the average wage is already much higher than Minimum Wage. Surely, it didn't benefit Londoners, particularly the typical Tory voter, and hence they had to oppose?
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    (Original post by rahulsood)
    Anglo-American links have become very close, largely under the Blair era, to an extent that we waged what many believe to be a -and i say this cautiously- 'pointless' war against Iraq, in the name of terror. Excuse my ignorance, but was Britain a real terror target before its alliance with America in the war? I think not. It was Ossama's war with America; NOT Britain.
    In your opinion, given the similarities between the parties now, would a Conservative Government have taken the same steps? :p:
    In my humble, albeit ill informed opinion, this is where the differences will really begin to manifest themselves.
    Probably far more so. Cameron and pretty much all the Tories also voted for the Iraq War. Thatcher and Reagan were even closer than Blair and Bush. I can imagine Cameron and McCain being right-wing warmongerers together, unfortunately.

    This isn't where the differences begin to manifest themselves - Tories have disagreed with barely any Labour foreign policy other than closer ties to Europe. The differences are economically and socially, domestically in the UK.
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    (Original post by rahulsood)
    and so do the Tories :p:
    Traditionally, most Conservative support has being centred in areas of London, and largely in the South East....areas where the average wage is already much higher than Minimum Wage. Surely, it didn't benefit Londoners, particularly the typical Tory voter, and hence they had to oppose?
    And hence the reality of class-conflict.
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    (Original post by rahulsood)
    Anglo-American links have become very close, largely under the Blair era, to an extent that we waged what many believe to be a -and i say this cautiously- 'pointless' war against Iraq, in the name of terror. Excuse my ignorance, but was Britain a real terror target before its alliance with America in the war? I think not.
    By domestic terrorists/the IRA's splinter groups yes, a heck of a lot more than we are not, believe me. Not that the Americans gave significant support (if any)

    Also we've always had a strong alliance with the US, Thatcher and Reagan were probably closer than Blair and Clinton/Bush.
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    One has an absolute **** of a leader. The other has an absolute... oh wait..
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    (Original post by Oswy)
    And hence the reality of class-conflict.
    and so we seem to be stuck in an infinite loop?
    Particular classes flock to their traditionally favoured parties, and the party makes policies to represent their demographic, not in the interest of the WHOLE nation....hence the cycle repeats itself?
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    (Original post by pretz)
    Funny how most Labour MPs are middle-class then, isn't it?
    Even under "old labour", the vast majority of labour MP's were middle/upper class.
Updated: May 24, 2009
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