Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Reue's TV Licensing FAQ

Announcements Posted on
    • 3 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    A lot of TVs have internal aerials that mean you can receive some semblance of a signal.
    Really?
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SillyFencer)
    Really?
    Yes - unfortunately all that is required to need a licence is that it is capable of receiving. It doesn't even have to be a decent pic.
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SillyFencer)
    Really?
    :ditto:

    evidence for this? TVs have a lot of wiring inside and wires are good at picking up radio waves, and I've never heard or seen any evidence 'a lot' of TVs have an aerial in, so i must admit i am skeptical. And also if you don't use your TV for watching TV then you don't need a license, as has been posted in the OP of this thread, so I'm inclined not to believe 'all that is required to need a licence is that it is capable of receiving' either.
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by olileauk)
    :ditto:

    evidence for this? TVs have a lot of wiring inside and wires are good at picking up radio waves, and I've never heard or seen any evidence 'a lot' of TVs have an aerial in, so i must admit i am skeptical. And also if you don't use your TV for watching TV then you don't need a license, as has been posted in the OP of this thread, so I'm inclined not to believe 'all that is required to need a licence is that it is capable of receiving' either.
    :rolleyes: anything that can pick up a signal is an aerial. I'm not overly fussed if you don't believe you are required to have a licence for equipment which is capable of receiving - it's not me that is risking the fine.
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    perhaps you should read this:

    http://tvlicensing.metafaq.com/templ...F0IH0II74GKOEO

    Your Selected Question
    What if I only use a TV to watch videos/DVDs/as a monitor for my games console? Do I still need a licence?

    You do not need a TV Licence if you only use your TV to watch videos and DVDs or as a monitor for your games console.
    Official TV licensing response says I'm right. *shrug*
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    That only applies where said set cannot receive any TV signals. Look at it logically, no licensing authority is going to put in such a huge loophole. Otherwise you'll all be watching TV on your "games console only TV sets".
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    That only applies where said set cannot receive any TV signals. Look at it logically, no licensing authority is going to put in such a huge loophole. Otherwise you'll all be watching TV on your "games console only TV sets".
    Where does it say that?
    So far, I haven't seen you providing any evidence to back that up, when the TV License Authority are currently backing me up without question..
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by olileauk)
    Where does it say that?
    So far, I haven't seen you providing any evidence to back that up, when the TV License Authority are currently backing me up without question..
    The thing you looked at says "not used for" but you have to contact them and they may send an inspector round to check. If the inspector finds that the TV can receive. they will require it to be licensed.

    The FAQs on government agency websites only ever give broad answers and often require you to get something further done which then more often than not removes you from the category you thought you were in.
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    The thing you looked at says "not used for" but you have to contact them and they may send an inspector round to check. If the inspector finds that the TV can receive. they will require it to be licensed.

    The FAQs on government agency websites only ever give broad answers and often require you to get something further done which then more often than not removes you from the category you thought you were in.
    I guess so. That makes sense, after all, but i expect i'd probably risk it (contact them and tell them and see if they let me) before applying for a license, 'cause it could work and there's no harm in trying ^.^
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by olileauk)
    I guess so. That makes sense, after all, but i expect i'd probably risk it (contact them and tell them and see if they let me) before applying for a license, 'cause it could work and there's no harm in trying ^.^
    hehehehehehe indeed. I suppose it'd be more difficult to prosecute if they visit you and say you don't need one then decide you do.
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    haha, yep, that's certainly true =D
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    You still need a licence if you are using it for games if he TV is capable of receiving a signal even if you don't watch it. The licence applies to televisions that can receive.
    This is incorrect I'm afraid, it has nothing to do with wether you *can* recieve a signal but by if you *are* recieveing a signal. Technically a box full of old wiring and bits of metal *could* recieve a signal if properly assembled.

    A television set is not a television reciever if it is not used to actually recieve the signals, regardless of if it could or not.

    Taken from The Communications (Television Licensing) Regulations 2004;

    Meaning of "television receiver"
    9. - (1) In Part 4 of the Act (licensing of TV reception), "television receiver" means any apparatus installed or used for the purpose of receiving (whether by means of wireless telegraphy or otherwise) any television programme service, whether or not it is installed or used for any other purpose.


    Refering to Communications Act 2003, Section 363(1)";

    Licence required for use of TV receiver (1) A television receiver must not be installed or used unless the installation and use of the receiver is authorised by a licence under this Part.


    So someone who only uses a TV for games has not installed it "for the purpose of recieveing.. television program services" and does not need a license.
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    This is incorrect I'm afraid, it has nothing to do with wether you *can* recieve a signal but by if you *are* recieveing a signal. Technically a box full of old wiring and bits of metal *could* recieve a signal if properly assembled.

    A television set is not a television reciever if it is not used to actually recieve the signals, regardless of if it could or not.

    Taken from The Communications (Television Licensing) Regulations 2004;

    Meaning of "television receiver"
    9. - (1) In Part 4 of the Act (licensing of TV reception), "television receiver" means any apparatus installed or used for the purpose of receiving (whether by means of wireless telegraphy or otherwise) any television programme service, whether or not it is installed or used for any other purpose.


    Refering to Communications Act 2003, Section 363(1)";

    Licence required for use of TV receiver (1) A television receiver must not be installed or used unless the installation and use of the receiver is authorised by a licence under this Part.


    So someone who only uses a TV for games has not installed it "for the purpose of recieveing.. television program services" and does not need a license.
    Just because the set is not tuned in does not mean it isn't receiving a signal. By definition, an aerial is receiving a signal if it is in an area of coverage regardless of whether or not you have tuned your TV.
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    'for the purpose of recieving' is they key phrase in that sentence: It would be interesting to see them prove that you were using your TV 'for the purpose of recieving' when it's not even tuned in and you're only using a DVD player/games console with it. :rofl:
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by olileauk)
    'for the purpose of recieving' is they key phrase in that sentence: It would be interesting to see them prove that you were using your TV 'for the purpose of recieving' when it's not even tuned in and you're only using a DVD player/games console with it. :rofl:
    They aren't going to let anyone get away with that - otherwise the way to avoid paying for a licence would be to not store your tuning and just retune every time you wanted to watch.
    • 15 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    mhm.

    well, you can happily be paranoid they're going to GET YOU for not having your TV tuned in, personally i'll happily risk it, what with it being written down everywhere that i'll be fine.
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by olileauk)
    mhm.

    well, you can happily be paranoid they're going to GET YOU for not having your TV tuned in, personally i'll happily risk it, what with it being written down everywhere that i'll be fine.
    If you ask them and get it in writing from then then probably so.

    I watch TV, so I would never fall within an exemption anyway.
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    They aren't going to let anyone get away with that - otherwise the way to avoid paying for a licence would be to not store your tuning and just retune every time you wanted to watch.
    What they are or are not 'going to let anyone get away' with is not of concern to me. The TVLA is a private company and has no powers above or beyond the law. The law very clearly states that you dont need a license if the set is not being used for the specific purpose of recieveing and viewing live television.

    I think I'd rather follow what the laws obviously state rather then what you personally think a provate company would do, thanks.
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Reue)
    What they are or are not 'going to let anyone get away' with is not of concern to me. The TVLA is a private company and has no powers above or beyond the law. The law very clearly states that you dont need a license if the set is not being used for the specific purpose of recieveing and viewing live television.

    I think I'd rather follow what the laws obviously state rather then what you personally think a provate company would do, thanks.
    The TV Licensing Authority is an executive agency of government. Furthermore, your interpretation of what the law "obviously states" is not the be all and end all as it is not you that would be making the decision. Regardless of whether or not you decide to watch the programmes, a TV with an aerial in a transmitter area is receiving.
    • Thread Starter
    • 11 followers
    Online

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    The TV Licensing Authority is an executive agency of government. Furthermore, your interpretation of what the law "obviously states" is not the be all and end all as it is not you that would be making the decision. Regardless of whether or not you decide to watch the programmes, a TV with an aerial in a transmitter area is receiving.
    The TVLA is a private company contracted to do some work, they are not an all powerful government organisation whom are beyond the law. They still need search warrents and theres no legal requirement whatsoever to even contact them.

    My interpretation of the law is the same interpretation shared by almost every single tv-license related website which all agree you do not need a license to use a tv if you're not actually watching tv on it.

    I'm not disagreeing that a TV is recieveing signals, however if someone is not using the tv for the purpose of recieveing signals then a license is not required. As stated in the law.

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: August 6, 2014
New on TSR

THE world university rankings 2014-2015 revealed

Will they affect your uni choices?

Article updates
Useful resources

Quick link:

Unanswered sound and vision threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups
Reputation gems:
You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.