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LLB Law: Difficulty?

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    Hi, I am interested in doing Law at University. I just wanted to know:

    1. how people find it
    2. how easy/hard it is to get a 2.1
    3. what the workload is like
    4. whether or not I would cope with it as I only got a C in GCSE English (A in English Lit) and I'm not doing English type subjects at AS Level, heard you have to do a lot of reading - if so, like how much? how many books a week/pages etc, are the books complicated?
    5. I also wanted to know what the typical starting salaries are for a newly qualified solicitor in a small sized law firm in outside of London law firms would be?

    Any feedback would be much appreciated, cheers.
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    The books are complicated.

    You must do a lot of reading.

    Exams are some problem questions, some essays. If you can't write essays and your English is not at least fairly decent, I would advise against a law degree.

    How hard it is depends on what uni you go to. But you would need to do a fair amount of work anywhere, though the actual hours you do probably wouldn't be above what you did at A-level. The difference is its essentially self-taught: its not a subject you learn from lectures like some science/medicine courses, there are lectures but you essentially learn the stuff from independent study.

    Solicitor in a small sized law firm outside London doesn't mean that much to me. Depends on what area you practice in, the quality of the firm and the location. I would guess 30-60k once you have finished training.
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    For 5 have a look at adverts on legal job sites, most people on here are only interested in the big london firms.
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    (Original post by MJJ90)
    Hi, I am interested in doing Law at University. I just wanted to know:

    1. how people find it
    2. how easy/hard it is to get a 2.1
    3. what the workload is like
    4. whether or not I would cope with it as I only got a C in GCSE English (A in English Lit) and I'm not doing English type subjects at AS Level, heard you have to do a lot of reading - if so, like how much? how many books a week/pages etc, are the books complicated?
    5. I also wanted to know what the typical starting salaries are for a newly qualified solicitor in a small sized law firm in outside of London law firms would be?

    Any feedback would be much appreciated, cheers.
    1. Very very very long and arduous!

    2. Quite hard, especially on black letter law subjects like Contract and Criminal but it is possible. A Law degree is definitely more difficult to master than any other social science. This is reflected in the number of firsts given (which are half compared to say, politics degrees).

    3. Horrendously huge. Each subject is similar to a full English A-level content wise so if you do four (or like us here) five subjects it will be a huge shock. Try reading around at least 100 pages per subject per week and that is the bare minimum. Sometimes you will have to read the case itself which is very difficult to understand initially and requires a lot of commitment. Key is not to give up. Core textbooks are very helpful in this area in explaining the key points.
    The standard expected is also very high. You can't get away with just unclear waffle. You need to know the substantive law and judgements in problem questions. Judgements are like what the judges say regarding a point of law and in many of the cases you study, there can be disagreement over them (which we call 'dissents').
    You also need to know the relevant criticisms of the law and the theoretical and conceptual issues, especially in essay questions - how does the area law fit in with the general issues? As you can see, all of this means reading and it means a lot of it. You can get away with doing very little through the year but you need to be focused when required - the examiners wont lower or rise grade boundaries. If you want a 2.1 you have to perform to 2.1 level.

    4. GCSE's and A-levels don't really matter. They show you can understand things and apply what you know but they are far from the be all end all of academic talent. If you are interested in Law then go for it. You will be rewarded with respect and the benefits after graduation. The skills you gain from the law degree are also quite helpful and sectors such as banking and finance areas really respect this. On the other hand, if you are looking for an easy 2.1, do something else.

    Good luck with your choice, I don't know about salaries but they would be competitive I would expect...
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    'judgments' - without e when referring to case, judgement is personal.

    sorry, had to correct you, cant help myself.
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    A lot depends on where you do it
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    1. how people find it
    I both love and hate it. It depends on my mood at the time. I've always loved the subject but sometimes it can be quite dull. Ironically though the subjects I dislike are often the ones most people like. (Tort. I hate Tort. I love Land and Equity & Trusts though)

    2. how easy/hard it is to get a 2.1
    If you do all the reading and make sure you understand the subject then its easy enough to get a 2:1 unless you mess up the exams which hopefully won't happen.

    3. what the workload is like
    However much you make it. If you want a 2:1 you're looking at at least 5 hours a day. First year at my uni was significantly easier though.

    4. whether or not I would cope with it as I only got a C in GCSE English (A in English Lit) and I'm not doing English type subjects at AS Level, heard you have to do a lot of reading - if so, like how much? how many books a week/pages etc, are the books complicated?
    Err, depends. Last year the average seminar for me (Bi weekly) was 1 chapter or about 50 pages and I had a two seminars every week. Along with that each seminar would have about 5 to 10 cases with each being about 10 to 20 pages long. My modules were Constitutional, Criminal, Contract and English Legal Process.
    This year I am relieved if a chapter is only 50 pages instead of the average of 80... one seminar was over 150 pages once. Plus about 10 cases for which the average length is about 30 pages long. My modules this year are Land, Equity & Trusts, Tort and EU Law.
    You might also have to read a couple of statutes but most statutes are relatively short.

    How easy the books are to read also depends on the books. My EU text book I consider cruel and inhumane, but only because its really poorly written not because its hard to understand. I prefer reading the cases myself and the treaties. Land and Equity and Trusts are considered to be the hardest modules to understand though I find them quite easy and enjoyable, especially Trusts. Tort meanwhile most people consider to be the easiest and its the one I am most concerned about.

    Go to the library or to your local university, most will allow a guest to come in and look at their books if you sign in and show some ID. Read some of the different text books and see what you think.

    The C in English Language doesn't mean much. You got an A in English Literature so you should be okay, that means that you can analyse texts and remember them well enough. I've found the stuff I learnt in English language hasn't really made any difference whereas Literature is actually much more relevant. Language is important but ultimately if you got an A in lit that means you can write essays fine and read texts fine. Don't worry about it.

    What A Levels are you doing? I did Law, Government and Politics, History and Critical Thinking... all of which I found helped. (Except law ironically, except to confirm that I liked the subject.)
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    I once counted for 1000+ pages for a Tort supervision I had to prepare for.

    I read 21.

    Needless to say I'm not enjoying revision at the moment.

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