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advantages and disadvantages of an uncodified constitution

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    i cant for the life of me find my AS notes:mad:

    i am revising for my synoptic on Friday and am comparing the codified and uncodified constitutions. However i cant find any adv and diadv on uncodified.

    any help anyone?
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    Adv = flexible, easier to update laws/rights to reflect social change, rules principles and institiutions have proven their worth over time rather than been artificially created, decisions on consititutional affairs are usually in the hands of ellected officials not unelected judges

    Dis = Unclear/confusing to many people regarding their rights, no clearly defined checks and balances, no set procedure for amending
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    For examples you can use how many amendments have been proposed in the US, something like 200 per Congressional term (a lot anyway), but there have only been 27 amendments, and when you consider that the first 10 are the Bill of Rights and two cancel each other out (prohibition of alcohol), there's really very few over the past 230 years.

    And on the other side of the coin, you could talk about the 42 days law: even in the 1600s it was supposed to be 3 days' imprisonment without charge, now the government's just been able to push through increase after increase; this might not happen if we had a clear and codified constitution.

    Not looking forward to unit 6... British politics is pants.
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    (Original post by Libbo)
    For examples you can use how many amendments have been proposed in the US, something like 200 per Congressional term (a lot anyway), but there have only been 27 amendments, and when you consider that the first 10 are the Bill of Rights and two cancel each other out (prohibition of alcohol), there's really very few over the past 230 years.

    And on the other side of the coin, you could talk about the 42 days law: even in the 1600s it was supposed to be 3 days' imprisonment without charge, now the government's just been able to push through increase after increase; this might not happen if we had a clear and codified constitution.

    Not looking forward to unit 6... British politics is pants.
    thanks for the help

    i know, i find US politics much more interesting! How did you find unit 5?

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