Results are out! Find what you need...fast. Get quick advice or join the chat
Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free to post

Cambridge Archaeology and Anthropology Students and Applicants

Announcements Posted on
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys. Just finished my second year doing a Geography degree and managed a high 2:1 so I'm having a look at Masters. As Geography is just most arts/humanities/social sciences subjects in disguise, Ive taken an interest in Anthropology and was wondering if anyone knows of the Anthropology department/ has experienced it. Thanks
    • 1 follower
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I've just finished my first year of the undergrad arch and anth course at Cambridge, and have found it amazing. I'm specializing in soc anth for my part two, mainly because I find it really interesting, but also because the department here is world class - with some great teaching and big names in the discipline.

    I think postgrad study here would be great, given the (presumably) good funding, great resources, generally friendly and helpful atmosphere, and a good turnover of fresh research. Social anthropology in particular would be awesome for postgrad study because its all about extended periods of research.

    The website can give you a much better idea, and if you contact the department you could also get some email addresses of supervisors and current Mphil students. http://www.socanth.cam.ac.uk/admissions/mphil/

    Have you read anything about theory? It might be good to do some research or a related module in order to get an idea of the direction you want to research in - its a huge discipline and while it might sound great to you now, a bit deeper digging could put you off the idea, particularly since the papers in each postgrad course vary quite significantly. For a basis in theory, I recommend Kuper’s ‘Anthropology and anthropologists’, and Eriksen’s ‘Small places, Large issues’ (my bible for first year paper 3). If you’re really desperate, PM me and I could find some postgrad people.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    So, I'm hoping to study Arch and Anth at Cambridge, and I have a few questions.

    1. Are there any books that you would recommend reading?
    2. Which college would you recommend for Arch and Anth?
    3. Are there any particular extra-curriculars etc that would improve my chances?
    4. What should I expect at the interview stage?

    Thanks so much!
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I can recomend some books, i am a PPS offer holder and thinking about doing the same bio anth module from arch and anth. Weve been given a recomended reading list for social anth and bio anth, so i can give you those!

    Bio anth

    ** Boyd, R. & Silk, J. (2006) How Humans Evolved (4th Edition). W. W. Norton & Co.
    Dawkins, R. (1989) The Selfish Gene (New Edition). Oxford University Press.
    de Waal, F. (2001) Tree of Origin. What Primate Behavior Can Tell Us about Human Social**
    Evolution. Harvard University Press.

    Harrison, G.A. et al. (1988) Human Biology (3rd Edition). Oxford University Press.
    Jones, S. et al. (1992) The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Human Evolution. Cambridge University
    Press.
    Lewin, R. & Foley, R. (2003) Principles of Human Evolution (2nd Edition). Blackwell Scientific
    Press.
    Ridley, M. (2003) Nature via Nurture. Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human. Fourth
    Estate.
    Ridley, M. (2000) Genome. Fourth Estate


    The ones in red are books, the other textbooks. Genome is good if your not doing biology, its an easy read and rather enjoyable.

    The selfish gene is worth reading even if you think you understand evolution.

    "Tree of life" is about ape evolution, its really interesting, but its not so much a page turner :P


    Social anth
    Background reading
    Barnard, A. & Spencer, J. (eds) (1996) Encyclopaedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology.
    Routledge.
    ** Eriksen, T.H. (1996) Small Places, Large Issues: an introduction to social and cultural
    anthropology. Pluto Press.
    Ingold, T. (ed.) (1994) Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology: Humanity, Culture and Social
    Life. London: Routledge
    Kuper, A. (1983) Anthropology and Anthropologists. Routledge.
    Layton, R. (1977) An introduction to Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge.
    Monaghan J. and P. Just (2000) Social & Cultural Anthropology: a very short introduction. Oxford
    University Press
    Core Ethnographies:
    Evans‐Pritchard, E. E. (1940) The Nuer: a description of the modes of livelihood and political
    institutions of a Nilotic people. Oxford: The Clarendon Press.
    Abu‐Lughod, Lila (1986) Veiled sentiments: honor and poetry in a Bedouin society. Berkeley and
    London: University of California Press
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    I just got my undergraduate degree in archaeology and bio anth in Germany.

    The most useful textbooks respectively introductions to paleoanthropology and archaeology are probably:

    - Klein, R., The human career (Third Edition, 2009), ~800 pages

    - Renfrew, C., Bahn, P., Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice (Fifth Edition 2008), ~ 600 pages

    Especially the former is a perfect introduction with a wealth of additional literature for each aspect discussed in the book.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iammichealjackson)
    I can recomend some books, i am a PPS offer holder and thinking about doing the same bio anth module from arch and anth. Weve been given a recomended reading list for social anth and bio anth, so i can give you those!

    Bio anth

    ** Boyd, R. & Silk, J. (2006) How Humans Evolved (4th Edition). W. W. Norton & Co.
    [COLOR="red"]Dawkins, R. (1989) The Selfish Gene (New Edition). Oxford University Press.
    [/COLOR][COLOR="Red"]de Waal, F. (2001) Tree of Origin. What Primate Behavior Can Tell Us about Human Social**
    Evolution. Harvard University Press.[/COLOR]
    Harrison, G.A. et al. (1988) Human Biology (3rd Edition). Oxford University Press.
    Jones, S. et al. (1992) The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Human Evolution. Cambridge University
    Press.
    Lewin, R. & Foley, R. (2003) Principles of Human Evolution (2nd Edition). Blackwell Scientific
    Press.
    [COLOR="Red"]Ridley, M. (2003) Nature via Nurture. Genes, Experience and What Makes Us Human. Fourth
    Estate.
    Ridley, M. (2000) Genome. Fourth Estate[/COLOR]

    The ones in red are books, the other textbooks. Genome is good if your not doing biology, its an easy read and rather enjoyable.

    The selfish gene is worth reading even if you think you understand evolution.

    "Tree of life" is about ape evolution, its really interesting, but its not so much a page turner :P


    Social anth
    Background reading
    Barnard, A. & Spencer, J. (eds) (1996) Encyclopaedia of Social and Cultural Anthropology.
    Routledge.
    ** Eriksen, T.H. (1996) Small Places, Large Issues: an introduction to social and cultural
    anthropology. Pluto Press.
    Ingold, T. (ed.) (1994) Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology: Humanity, Culture and Social
    Life. London: Routledge
    Kuper, A. (1983) Anthropology and Anthropologists. Routledge.
    Layton, R. (1977) An introduction to Theory in Anthropology. Cambridge.
    Monaghan J. and P. Just (2000) Social & Cultural Anthropology: a very short introduction. Oxford
    University Press
    Core Ethnographies:
    Evans‐Pritchard, E. E. (1940) The Nuer: a description of the modes of livelihood and political
    institutions of a Nilotic people. Oxford: The Clarendon Press.
    Abu‐Lughod, Lila (1986) Veiled sentiments: honor and poetry in a Bedouin society. Berkeley and
    London: University of California Press
    Thanks so much!! This'll be really helpful...or so I hope :P I have no idea what a PPS offer holder is, but good luck, or whatever the appropriate sentiment would be...:P Thanks again!
    • 14 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by **CC**)
    Thanks so much!! This'll be really helpful...or so I hope :P I have no idea what a PPS offer holder is, but good luck, or whatever the appropriate sentiment would be...:P Thanks again!
    Means that he was offered a place at Cambridge to study Politics, Psychology and Sociology (and is awaiting thursday to see if he got in).
    • 6 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by **CC**)
    Thanks so much!! This'll be really helpful...or so I hope :P I have no idea what a PPS offer holder is, but good luck, or whatever the appropriate sentiment would be...:P Thanks again!
    Yeh PPS is Politics, Psychology and Sociology is another course or tripos, but the name is being changed to Social Sciences Tripos since you can study alot more than those three subjects in the first year. Actually there is also the archeology paper aswell, which has this as the background reading:

    Background reading
    Renfrew, A.C. & Bahn, P. (2000) Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice (3rd Edition).
    London: Thames & Hudson.
    ** Scarre, C., ed. (2005) The Human Past. London: Thames and Hudson
    Wenke, R. (1999) Patterns in Prehistory (4th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press.


    P.S i found this,, might be helpful. You can even do PPS modules in the first year:
    http://www.archanth.cam.ac.uk/Curren...dbook_1011.pdf
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Ah, how nice to see an arch anth thread for cambridge...seemed like there was no one else out there!
    Erm I was just wondering....I did anthropology for IB, so I was wondering how essential the reading list it? Will read one book from each subtopic, but atm am in Tanzania so post would take around six months....
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Melie)
    Ah, how nice to see an arch anth thread for cambridge...seemed like there was no one else out there!
    Erm I was just wondering....I did anthropology for IB, so I was wondering how essential the reading list it? Will read one book from each subtopic, but atm am in Tanzania so post would take around six months....
    Some people read lots before starting, others read very little. It's worth reading something, especially if there's one discipline that you know less about.

    That said, there are books on that list that I still haven't fully read, and I'm about to start my third year.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bjark)
    I just got my undergraduate degree in archaeology and bio anth in Germany.

    The most useful textbooks respectively introductions to paleoanthropology and archaeology are probably:

    - Klein, R., The human career (Third Edition, 2009), ~800 pages

    - Renfrew, C., Bahn, P., Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice (Fifth Edition 2008), ~ 600 pages

    Especially the former is a perfect introduction with a wealth of additional literature for each aspect discussed in the book.
    To add to this a little, for those of you taking the first year Bio Anth paper, Boyd & Silk's 'How Humans Evolved', and Lewin & Foley's 'Principles of Human Evolution' are going to be very useful.

    I'd strongly encourage you to request that your college library gets copies of these if they don't already hold it.
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by **CC**)
    So, I'm hoping to study Arch and Anth at Cambridge, and I have a few questions.

    1. Are there any books that you would recommend reading?
    I'd recommend taking a look at one book from each discipline so that you have a good idea as to what the course is going to entail.

    Personally I'd go for;

    Archaeology: The Human Past - Chris Scarre,
    Social Anthroplogy: Small Places, Large Issues - Eriksen
    Biological Anthropology: How Humans Evolved - Boyd & Silk

    Each would give you a fairly entry level overview of each subject. The other thing to familiarise yourself with is the Part I handbook which is put up online on the Arch & Anth website. It gives more information as to what is covered in each paper, and preliminary reading lists (though you are not expected to cover these yet).

    (Original post by **CC**)
    2. Which college would you recommend for Arch and Anth?
    It makes no real difference. Your college will be the place in which you are living, eating, socialising etc, and so college choice should reflect those things.

    For example, if there is a particular sport that you are interested in, pick a college that offers it.

    I'd really advise coming to Cambridge to visit the colleges if at all possible.

    The undergraduate Part I handbook contains a list (right at the back) of the Director of Studies for Arch & Anth at each college if you are at all interested, though having a DoS who is not from "your" discipline will not adversely affect your degree in any way.

    (Original post by **CC**)
    3. Are there any particular extra-curriculars etc that would improve my chances?
    Anything that helps demonstrate an interest in, or passion for, the subject would not be a bad thing to have in your Personal Statement.

    (Original post by **CC**)
    4. What should I expect at the interview stage?
    The Cambridge Prospective Undergraduate Arch & Anth page has a list that will give you some further information as to what to expect as it differs a little by college.

    Some colleges will want you to send work in for them to see prior to interview, others give a test on the day of the interview etc. The "type" of interviews may also vary. I had a "subject" interview that was very academically based, and then a "general" interview that did not discuss my subject at all. Fellow students at different colleges have said that they had two interviews, though there was no such distinction.

    Once you have settled on a college choice, check the Undergraduate page, and the subject page on the specific college website.

    As a general point, the A&A interview is really no different to any other subject interview. The information held on TSR about Cambridge interviews is very useful, and will be worth reading.

    Best of luck
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by moonkatie)
    I'd recommend taking a look at one book from each discipline so that you have a good idea as to what the course is going to entail.

    Personally I'd go for;

    Archaeology: The Human Past - Chris Scarre,
    Social Anthroplogy: Small Places, Large Issues - Eriksen
    Biological Anthropology: How Humans Evolved - Boyd & Silk

    Each would give you a fairly entry level overview of each subject. The other thing to familiarise yourself with is the Part I handbook which is put up online on the Arch & Anth website. It gives more information as to what is covered in each paper, and preliminary reading lists (though you are not expected to cover these yet).



    It makes no real difference. Your college will be the place in which you are living, eating, socialising etc, and so college choice should reflect those things.

    For example, if there is a particular sport that you are interested in, pick a college that offers it.

    I'd really advise coming to Cambridge to visit the colleges if at all possible.

    The undergraduate Part I handbook contains a list (right at the back) of the Director of Studies for Arch & Anth at each college if you are at all interested, though having a DoS who is not from "your" discipline will not adversely affect your degree in any way.



    Anything that helps demonstrate an interest in, or passion for, the subject would not be a bad thing to have in your Personal Statement.



    The Cambridge Prospective Undergraduate Arch & Anth page has a list that will give you some further information as to what to expect as it differs a little by college.

    Some colleges will want you to send work in for them to see prior to interview, others give a test on the day of the interview etc. The "type" of interviews may also vary. I had a "subject" interview that was very academically based, and then a "general" interview that did not discuss my subject at all. Fellow students at different colleges have said that they had two interviews, though there was no such distinction.

    Once you have settled on a college choice, check the Undergraduate page, and the subject page on the specific college website.

    As a general point, the A&A interview is really no different to any other subject interview. The information held on TSR about Cambridge interviews is very useful, and will be worth reading.

    Best of luck
    Thank you so much for help I got a conditional from Trinity on Thursday and I am SO SO PLEASED!!!!
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by **CC**)
    Thank you so much for help I got a conditional from Trinity on Thursday and I am SO SO PLEASED!!!!
    That's fantastic news - congratulations
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone, I've applied for the MPhil in Assyriology (eek a second masters!) and was wondering if anyone new if the department/ degree committee stages are the same in the arch/anthro department for the postgraduate application. Also, do you know of any other students in this program? Thanks for any help.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • 0 followers
    Offline

    ReputationRep:
    hey everybody...i am applying for M.Phil in Archaeology and i am planning to study after a 5 year break. any recommendations and anything i need to be prepared for???

    would love a few inputs.

    Thank u

Reply

Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. By joining you agree to our Ts and Cs, privacy policy and site rules

  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: June 10, 2013
New on TSR

The future of apprenticeships

Join the discussion in the apprenticeships hub!

Article updates
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.