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What jobs can you do with a degree in Biochemistry (C700)

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    What jobs could i do with a degree in biochemistry. The Bsc or the Masters.

    From a university such as Newcastle, Sheffield, Leicester, Bristol.
    Could you also go into abit of detail about what the job entails and typical salaries

    Thanks guys
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    biochemist
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    Lawyer.
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    You can be a lawyer with biochemistry?
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    (Original post by The Toffy)
    You can be a lawyer with biochemistry?
    If you do a one-year law conversion course after you graduate, yes. You can enter law from any discipline, and if you come from a scientific background there may be some specialist fields where you could utilise that knowledge (e.g. intellectual property).
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    Well, Sheffield being 4th in the country for Biosciences, (Imperial 5th) it is very well respected by employeers in the industry!

    So I'd say anything in the industry; research, academic etc...Though a PhD would be a requirement for these areas. For a Bsc/Msc then a reseacher in companies like Glaxosmithkline or Astrazeneca is possible!

    http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/tol_...ect=BIOLOGICAL
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    Is it hard to do a biochemical degree and get into Law?
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    Biochemistry is central to the medical sciences.

    You could do a masters and go into industry.
    Or a PhD and go into research.
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    (Original post by The Toffy)
    Is it hard to do a biochemical degree and get into Law?
    Not really. The course is hard, but it's the same for all students.

    Also, what does C700 mean?
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Also, what does C700 mean?
    C700 is the UCAS course code for Biochemistry.
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    (Original post by βored)
    C700 is the UCAS course code for Biochemistry.
    Oh, I thought it was something important, nevermind.
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    You could go into Forensic Science too!
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    That's so weird. I was about to come on here and ask the exact same question! For me I can't decide if I wanna do medicine or biochemistry..but I don't know anything about careers you can go into with a biochem degree and whether it's worth it. I've only heard about research and industry so far. Does anyone know about salaries aswell?
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    You'll almost certainly earn a lot more in medicine than you ever will in biochemistry. But that applies to all the sciences if you're wanting to stay in them and do front line research (which for 'some' people is more rewarding than money).
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    (Original post by gruffyddd)
    You'll almost certainly earn a lot more in medicine than you ever will in biochemistry. But that applies to all the sciences if you're wanting to stay in them and do front line research (which for 'some' people is more rewarding than money).
    As a biochemistry graduate and PhD student in neuroscience - I am one of "those people."

    You will earn a lot of money in medicine, for sure. However you have to weigh up what makes you happy. I was offered medicine and turned it down. Why?

    Because I felt I would never get the satisfaction that I want from my profession. As a doctor, you have the chance to help one person at a time over the course of a few years of your life. As a scientist, its rare - but if you are good enough and innovative enough you have the potential to help far more people, depending on what field you are in. I've worked in clinical, basic and translational labs. Most entry level clinicians do not have the flexibility/time/ to devote to the experimental investigation side of things. Thats what put me off. I could not devote myself to something that I was not truly passionate about. I'm passionate about the questions I'm trying to answer - I would not be able to do that (to this scale/extent) if I was a medic.

    A doctor is a defined career path to an extent - you're sure of where you are. You will always get paid. As a science graduate, you take a risk. You live from research grant to research grant and its essentially a non-secure profession. But, your findings may generate a cure or therapy for some disease. Thats the catch. Doctors do research too... but thats far more common in the US than here. You would still be involved in research, but the extent will be much less.

    Do you want to be secure or take a risk? Thats the way I looked at it when I had the choice.
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    I am halfway...well almost...through my Biochem degree and as far as I know a Biochem graduate can go either into research or industry depending on whether you're interested in pure science or a more application based approach...as far as salaries are concerned, a gradute in Biochem can demand about 10-14000 quid a year on a contract basis...
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    (Original post by CDP)
    Do you want to be secure or take a risk? Thats the way I looked at it when I had the choice.
    You can be secure in science as well - it's called industry.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    You can be secure in science as well - it's called industry.
    I agree to an extent! Depending on who you're with!

    And even then, I'd doubt that your intellectual property would be safe! You certainly have far more chances to make more money in industry than in academia.

    In my country a full professor's salary can be anything from €100,000 a year upwards depending on reputation. But then again, a postdoc in the states in industry (in the right place) can earn $60,000 starting with as little as a year's postdoc experience. It also depends where your funding is coming from - as I say, if your research is good enough - you will have no problem securing the big grants.

    It just depends on what you want and if you're good enough plus have the confidence to be where you need to be. You also have to make yourself valuable, for example - its regarded as better to do your postgrad abroad. You can make yourself more valuable with the decisions you make at undergrad/grad level. The more research experience you have, the higher your grades, the younger you are, the more publications you have, prestigious fellowships, who funds you for your PhD, reputation in the field, previous supervisors, novel skills and attributes that you have... it all adds up.

    A good biochem graduate can earn a lot of money if he/she makes strategic decisions early on in his/her career.
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    Science based jobs are always secure; you just have to be willing to move area/country.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    I am halfway...well almost...through my Biochem degree and as far as I know a Biochem graduate can go either into research or industry depending on whether you're interested in pure science or a more application based approach...as far as salaries are concerned, a gradute in Biochem can demand about 10-14000 quid a year on a contract basis...

    I heard that there are other possibilities outside of science jobs if one does a Biochemistry degree, such as taking an accountant course whilst working for deloitte etc. I heard that these type of companies don't mind what type of degree you do as long as it is academic and stimulating and come away with some transferable skills.

    Is this true?

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