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How are degrees marked/graded

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    How is each year graded? i have 6 modules worth a total of 120 credits if i pass them all (which i need to do to pass the degree) do i get all 120 credits? and if so how the different levels of degree determined at the end of my 3 years or i pass them all with 50% do i get 60 credits?

    thanks
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    You get the maximum credits for any module you pass. For instance, in a 20 credit module, you still get 20 credits, even if you only scrape a pass. You normally cannot pass a year without getting the full 120 credits, although some Universities may allow you to progress if you fail one module.

    In terms of identifying the classification of your year, it is generally an average based upon your mark for each module. For instance if you got 72 for three of your modules and 68 for the other three, you would get an overall grade of 70, giving you a 1st. However, it's a little more complicated than that because some modules are only worth 10 credits, and thus have less of an impact on your final grading.
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    A three year degree is worth 360 CATS. 120 credits for each year. If you pass all units at 50% you get a lower second degree roughly.
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    how easy is it to get 100%?
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    70%+ is a 1st
    60 to 69 is a 2.1
    50 to 59 is a 2.2
    40 to 49 is a 3rd
    I believe this is the grading for most Universities
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    The first year usually doesn't count towards the final degree classification. It's just there as a bridge between A-levels and "proper" degree study. Of course you still need to pass it, so it's still important, but whether you only just scrape though or get 75% in all modules it usually will not matter.

    The second and third years do count towards the degree classification. Different universities have different systems and may weigh things up differently. I'd recommend checking with your university. However, as a general rule, your final degree classification may be spilt equally between your second and third year, or it may be split 60:40 (in favour of the third year).

    Honours degrees are usually classified thus: -

    Firsts (70%+)
    2:1 (60%+)
    2:2 (50%+)
    3 (40%+)

    Then you just have the basic pass (without the honours). I'll come onto that. When employers and universities (for postgrad study) ask for a "good honours degree" it will usually mean a 2:1 or a first (although an increasing number of employers are lowering their requirements to 2:2s).

    As you said, you'll usually take 120 credits (six modules) in each year. You'll usually need to pass all modules to get an honours degree. If you fail some modules during your final two years the you may still get a degree without the honours. So just a basic BA as opposed to a BA (hons). Universities will differ in how many modules they'll allow a student to fail. I'd be suprised if it's more than three at most unis.

    But universities have their different systems (this is especially the case in Scotland, who often have four year "undergraduate" masters degrees). This is just one of the most common outside Scotland. There will be differences in unis. I'd check with your university.
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    (Original post by fxytimi)
    how easy is it to get 100%?
    Impossible. Nobody really gets above 75 or 80%. 80% is in fact virtually unheard of.
  8. Offline

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    (Original post by fxytimi)
    how easy is it to get 100%?
    Quite feasible if you're doing maths or a sciency subject and happen to be bloody good at it, but otherwise it isn't likely to happen.
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    I shall not be aiming for 100% then, as im doing civil engineering
  10. Offline

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    (Original post by fxytimi)
    I shall not be aiming for 100% then, as im doing civil engineering
    Well, you can aim for it, just don't expect to reach it very often (if at all).
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    (Original post by cjgbr)
    70%+ is a 1st
    60 to 69 is a 2.1
    50 to 59 is a 2.2
    40 to 49 is a 3rd
    I believe this is the grading for most Universities
    Why can't it be:

    70%+ is an A*
    60 to 69 is an A
    50 to 59 is a B
    40 to 49 is a C
    I believe this should be the grading for GCSEs
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Well, you can aim for it, just don't expect to reach it very often (if at all).
    I had 100% in a maths exam, which was the highlight of my first year:woo: however its harder in essay to get 100%, 70% + is my aim overall
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Why can't it be:

    70%+ is an A*
    60 to 69 is an A
    50 to 59 is a B
    40 to 49 is a C
    I believe this should be the grading for GCSEs
    And so it is. But why would the grading of degrees have to conform to that?
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    (Original post by River85)
    The first year usually doesn't count towards the final degree classification. It's just there as a bridge between A-levels and "proper" degree study. Of course you still need to pass it, so it's still important, but whether you only just scrape though or get 75% in all modules it usually will not matter.

    The second and third years do count towards the degree classification. Different universities have different systems and may weigh things up differently. I'd recommend checking with your university. However, as a general rule, your final degree classification may be spilt equally between your second and third year, or it may be split 60:40 (in favour of the third year).

    Honours degrees are usually classified thus: -

    Firsts (70%+)
    2:1 (60%+)
    2:2 (50%+)
    3 (40%+)

    Then you just have the basic pass (without the honours). I'll come onto that. When employers and universities (for postgrad study) ask for a "good honours degree" it will usually mean a 2:1 or a first (although an increasing number of employers are lowering their requirements to 2:2s).

    As you said, you'll usually take 120 credits (six modules) in each year. You'll usually need to pass all modules to get an honours degree. If you fail some modules during your final two years the you may still get a degree without the honours. So just a basic BA as opposed to a BA (hons). Universities will differ in how many modules they'll allow a student to fail. I'd be suprised if it's more than three at most unis.

    But universities have their different systems (this is especially the case in Scotland, who often have four year "undergraduate" masters degrees). This is just one of the most common outside Scotland. There will be differences in unis. I'd check with your university.
    Wow now that is awsome review:yep:
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    And so it is. But why would the grading of degrees have to conform to that?
    No it isn't. If it was, why is Edexcel/AQA GCSE Art have a percentage of 98%+ for an A*? Well?
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    No it isn't. If it was, why is Edexcel/AQA GCSE Art have a percentage of 98%+ for an A*? Well?
    Is it really?? I'd feel slightly more chuffed if it was.
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    Yes it is! I've just checked it now!
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Quite feasible if you're doing maths or a sciency subject and happen to be bloody good at it, but otherwise it isn't likely to happen.
    I agree. I study Philosophy and I know a dual honours Maths/Philosophy student who averages about 80% in the Symbolic Logic modules (of which there are 3)

    Plus I once got 76% for an exam on the Philosophy of John Locke
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    Yes it is! I've just checked it now!
    Schueeeet

    Though I can't be too surprised since I got 100% in it.
  20. Offline

    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    Schueeeet

    Though I can't be too surprised since I got 100% in it.
    ****. Really?! How on earth did you get that? Please PM me how you did that - honestly... :puppyeyes:
Updated: August 13, 2009
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