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The Ultimate Disabled Students Sticky

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Interview Discussion 30-01-2014
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    I know it's not what you're asking for, but:
    You can keep your equipment. You should also get things such as extra time and other concessions you may have.
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    Hi, I was diagnosed with dyspraxia, with some overlapping dyslexic aspects, in 2005.The process of being labelled was in itself pretty unfortunate, since there is an alarming lack of knowledge in most academic circles about the strengths and support needs that students with learning differences possess, and the support on offer varies from helpful to non-existent!
    When you are sent out on placements, problems with this lack of insight can multiply, with placements being very wary about the implications of having 'a disabled' student on site.
    This is just a brief 'here I am' note to let other students know that I am really happy to offer advice and support to other students about the assessment process, and some advice about the support out there.We really need to share our experiences.
    As someone who had to go to Court, I really do know from the sharp end what needs to be done to improve the progression rates of disabled students.
    For instance ...If universities simply sent a student support adviser to accompany disabled students along to placement set-up meetings, so much grief could be avoided...this would help to ensure that student placements adequately meet National Occupational standards.
    I have loads of experience, and you can look up my facebook group, 'Diff-ability', if you want more information.Cheers!
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    This isn't strictly uni related, although it does relate, and my condition isn't a disablity per se but it's bothering me.

    I have a condition that means that if I overheat, I feint, and fit, similarly to a minor epileptic fit. Many authorities treat it as epilepsy, as it is very similar. It's been investigated, and the hospital came to the conclusion that I have them so infequently and they are so short that it's not worth the side effects of medication, especially as I am normal within an hour of having them, just very hungry. (In theory if I had one at the beginning of the day, if I sat in a quiet room for a while I could return to lessons for the rest of the day).

    My question is quite general, but this is where I thought it would best go, but when applying for sixth form/uni/jobs, how will I declare it as it doesn't come under a normal "disability bracket"?

    I require very little support, and for my GCSE exams next year I am simply being placed in a separate room with a fan and water, and as I can't have that in lessons, in lessons I can leave to splash water etc without quibble. It's not a big ask, and all but one of my current teachers accepted it without quibble (and the one that didn't hates me anyway!)
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    Hullo. Not sure if I post in this part.. but anyhoo

    I've been hard of hearing since I was born and wear two hearing aids. I declared my disability on my UCAS form and on my student finance application, but haven't applied for anything to help. I did get the DSA form though.

    It's occurred to me I'm going to be having lectures in a lecture theatre for the first time and starting to stress out now. On my joining instructions, there's an email address for the disability person at my uni, but I don't know what to say. Things that are really worrying me are the alarms - both fire and my normal ones for waking up. I really struggle at home with that, which is embarrassing, and my hearing is getting worse and I don't have any ideas to overcome it. What can a university do when you have a hearing impairment? I feel like I'm making a fuss

    Also, I had a helper in primary and secondary school who supported me with my speech problems, exams and things but confused when it comes to university and living; how much things'll change etc. I've lived alone during college but it's going to be different as I won't have family support there. So not sure how to tackle the issue with the university.
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    (Original post by kwassa)
    Hullo. Not sure if I post in this part.. but anyhoo

    I've been hard of hearing since I was born and wear two hearing aids. I declared my disability on my UCAS form and on my student finance application, but haven't applied for anything to help. I did get the DSA form though.

    It's occurred to me I'm going to be having lectures in a lecture theatre for the first time and starting to stress out now. On my joining instructions, there's an email address for the disability person at my uni, but I don't know what to say. Things that are really worrying me are the alarms - both fire and my normal ones for waking up. I really struggle at home with that, which is embarrassing, and my hearing is getting worse and I don't have any ideas to overcome it. What can a university do when you have a hearing impairment? I feel like I'm making a fuss

    Also, I had a helper in primary and secondary school who supported me with my speech problems, exams and things but confused when it comes to university and living; how much things'll change etc. I've lived alone during college but it's going to be different as I won't have family support there. So not sure how to tackle the issue with the university.
    you need to get in contact with your university's disabled students' service (or equivalent) they should be able to help sort things out for you or at least know who you should contact
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    I have all of my stuff for starting uni from the DSA a few days ago and one of them I put some money towards myself and changed it slightly from the assessors report. Now I have it I have realised it is not as good as it could be. I was just actually wondering (cheeky as it may seem) is there any way that I could return this product and actually either change it back. Any advice would be great.
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    Hi!

    I wanted to know if non-UK nationals are eligible for DSA.

    Could someone also please tell me where to submit the DSA form (outside UK, online perhaps..but I can't find the link anywhere on the website)

    Thanks in advance
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    As far as I am aware, international students are not eligible for DSA and have to apply for help from their own country.
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    I am planning on starting my Masters next year in October 2014 I applied for DSA during my undergraduate year as I am dyslexic, I received a laptop and various other equipments. My laptop is not really in a good condition various parts of have come apart i.e the lense came off, the fan grill is broken and the hinges are crap. many people which have the same make as mine have also complained of having the same problem with this lenovo laptop. The rest of my equipment is fine such as my printer, and dictaphone. My question is would I be entitled to get a brand new laptop, or do I have to buy a new one myself. Please explain to me how it works
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    Hey guys, I have an arm impairment (writing arm) so obviously I really struggle to take notes. I already have a laptop but because of said impairment I don't think I'll be able to take it to lectures with me as it's too heavy, especially with books etc in my bag as well although it's indispensable for writing essays and assignments on. My question is basically, do you think it would be a good idea to get a tablet computer thing like an ipad or whatever, since they're smaller and lighter, and can take notes and act as a dictaphone? Or would that be a waste of money (I know how expensive they are, and hardly expect DSA to pay for one!)?
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    (Original post by Etoile)
    Hey guys, I have an arm impairment (writing arm) so obviously I really struggle to take notes. I already have a laptop but because of said impairment I don't think I'll be able to take it to lectures with me as it's too heavy, especially with books etc in my bag as well although it's indispensable for writing essays and assignments on. My question is basically, do you think it would be a good idea to get a tablet computer thing like an ipad or whatever, since they're smaller and lighter, and can take notes and act as a dictaphone? Or would that be a waste of money (I know how expensive they are, and hardly expect DSA to pay for one!)?
    Another option, which DSA will fund, is a note taker.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Another option, which DSA will fund, is a note taker.
    As in a person to take my notes for me? That sounds pretty cool, how do they know what to write down though?
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    (Original post by Etoile)
    As in a person to take my notes for me? That sounds pretty cool, how do they know what to write down though?
    Yes. They'd be in the lecture with you and would be listening to the lecturer and writing what's being said.

    I've got one and due to my disabilities, she's also used for help with reading, etc.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    Yes. They'd be in the lecture with you and would be listening to the lecturer and writing what's being said.

    I've got one and due to my disabilities, she's also used for help with reading, etc.
    That's pretty cool, then you automatically don't have to worry about sitting by yourself Doesn't it mean you don't learn as much though, because you're not writing it yourself? How I learn is by writing things down, but obviously slowly and with rest breaks :/
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    (Original post by Etoile)
    That's pretty cool, then you automatically don't have to worry about sitting by yourself Doesn't it mean you don't learn as much though, because you're not writing it yourself? How I learn is by writing things down, but obviously slowly and with rest breaks :/
    Do you find mind maps helpful? You can use the lecture notes to create your own mind maps or notes after the lecture. Perhaps test yourself by making a mind map (without the lecture notes), then check the lecture notes and see how much you've remembered. Then fill in the rest of the mind map with the lecture notes as a guide.

    This is just a suggestion, it depends on your learning style.

    You just don't need to worry about writing down all information in a lecture, which often means you miss some things.

    I often find I've remembered more, and paid more attention, when I don't have to worry about writing things down.

    *I recorded lectures, I didn't have a note taker.
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    hello

    applying for DSA in the coming days i have work today so can't do it today

    i have OCD and depression etc.. so its quite hard... the doctor's note doesnt explain half of it so im worried that the DSA will just look at it and think im making it up or something. they were so snotty in it! they didnt mention depression at all, so i may also put in a letter from Mind (im currently with them for CBT) that says about the thoughts etc.. too

    one positive is that the DSA assessment may be at the uni i want to go to.. so its an excuse to go and see the uni again and be motivated i think.

    just not sure what they can actually do. my problem is when the mental stuff gets very bad (causing depression) i cant focus at all, all words dont look like words in a way... and also its very hard to be in a room with more than 1 person (parents understand that so if they need to talk to me only 1 comes in at a time..)

    hope everyone is okay
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    (Original post by River85)
    Do you find mind maps helpful? You can use the lecture notes to create your own mind maps or notes after the lecture. Perhaps test yourself by making a mind map (without the lecture notes), then check the lecture notes and see how much you've remembered. Then fill in the rest of the mind map with the lecture notes as a guide.

    This is just a suggestion, it depends on your learning style.

    You just don't need to worry about writing down all information in a lecture, which often means you miss some things.

    I often find I've remembered more, and paid more attention, when I don't have to worry about writing things down.

    *I recorded lectures, I didn't have a note taker.
    I actually had my needs assessment today and we've established that among other things I can get a dictaphone with some software that turns it into notes for me :eek: Sadly mindmaps don't tend to work for me but I'm sure I can work something out; you're probably right about paying more attention too!
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    Not sure if this is in the right place but i'll write it anyhoo ..I am on DLA (highest for mobility) and have never lived alone and worried about applying for DSA incase I loose my DLA claim, now any new claims will become PiP claims ....I have a chronic spinal injury (curvature & surgery which stops me carrying weights and random pain spasms) and Parralysed Vocal cords which are incurable and cause me to wear a "trachy tube" which needs medical upkeep & carrying medical equipment always with me. It may not seem a lot but a combo of breathing uses (Vocal cords not working ^) and back pain can create blocks in carrying objects (books, laptops etc) and travel can not be far walked so will either need a nearby bus or taxi ....My main question is "Can you claim DSA if you are still receiving DLA? based on that description, or would I loose my DLA?" :confused: Oh & sorry for the rant x
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    (Original post by Danie90)
    Not sure if this is in the right place but i'll write it anyhoo ..I am on DLA (highest for mobility) and have never lived alone and worried about applying for DSA incase I loose my DLA claim, now any new claims will become PiP claims ....I have a chronic spinal injury (curvature & surgery which stops me carrying weights and random pain spasms) and Parralysed Vocal cords which are incurable and cause me to wear a "trachy tube" which needs medical upkeep & carrying medical equipment always with me. It may not seem a lot but a combo of breathing uses (Vocal cords not working ^) and back pain can create blocks in carrying objects (books, laptops etc) and travel can not be far walked so will either need a nearby bus or taxi ....My main question is "Can you claim DSA if you are still receiving DLA? based on that description, or would I loose my DLA?" :confused: Oh & sorry for the rant x
    Applying for DSA will have no effect on your DLA. I also receive higher rate mobility DLA and have applied for DSA and there are no problems whatsoever


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Updated: June 25, 2013
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