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Healthcare/Nursing assistant interview questions..

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    I just had an interview to be a nursing assistant, I don't want the job but went to the interview to prepare myself for others this week, so i can get pratice etc. I was just wondering how some people on here who have worked in a healthcare setting or been a HCA would respond to some of these questions?

    A neighbour of yours has a relative in hospital and ask you which ward they are in, what do you say?


    Registered Nurses are busy and a doctor asks you to adminster an injection, something you've seen but not done, what do you do?


    What do you think makes good teamwork in the NHS?

    How is good communication vital for teamwork? (i hated this question as i felt i was repeating the above)

    Any insight into how you would respond would be nice..good to see if i responded the right way aswell...
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    Good Luck with your interview. In response to your questions.....I would answer in this way:

    1) You are not at liberty to divulge any patients details, ie medical condition, the ward they are on etc.

    2) You would never give an injection as a HCA no matter how many times you had seen it done by the nurse. You also tell the Dr you are not qualified and refuse to do it.

    3) Good communication

    4) Good communication is vital in team work , without it the patient could suffer.

    i know these arent very lengthy or whatever but I"ve just seen this thread as I"m going out to collect my kids from school.
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    (Original post by anna_spanner89)
    I just had an interview to be a nursing assistant, I don't want the job but went to the interview to prepare myself for others this week, so i can get pratice etc. I was just wondering how some people on here who have worked in a healthcare setting or been a HCA would respond to some of these questions?

    A neighbour of yours has a relative in hospital and ask you which ward they are in, what do you say?
    You cannot give out personal details regardless of how well you know the people in question - unless there is a medical reason to let them know. Even within a hospital you cant just go round giving out details/notes. Regardless you probably dont actually know unless it really is a tiny hospital, though thats besides the point.

    Registered Nurses are busy and a doctor asks you to adminster an injection, something you've seen but not done, what do you do?
    Do NOT ever ever ever ever do a proceedure you are not familiar/confident/competent to do as chances are youll **** it up and hurt someone = black mark on your record. If a doctor gets you to do something (especially if hes a houseman) tell him to go do it himself or even better to SHOW you (after all these guys should be competent by now)... OK so they dont have masses of time to go round teaching nurses but it doesnt hurt to be a bit cheeky :P
    What do you think makes good teamwork in the NHS?
    Having good feedback from patients. This is the number one factor that you can use to determine if youre doing it right. If the patients recover and have a reasonably good hospital experience then theyll (most of the time) thank you for it. The only way this is going to happen consistently is by having a good team, good organisation, good communication for handovers and by everyone realising their part in the game.
    How is good communication vital for teamwork? (i hated this question as i felt i was repeating the above)
    Obviously its totally essential. If theres a patient lying there you need to not only be able to talk to them about what you want them to do, but just as importantly, possibly more importantly (definately more importantly from the perspective of your patient getting better) you need to be able to accurately inform other carers (doctors other nurses etc) about the state of each and every patient - its no good getting home at night and realising Mr Smith's cannula fell out but you didnt tell anyone, as little did you know that the little bag of goodies he was hooked up to was maintaining his electrolyte levels so when you walk in in the morning you find hes had an arrest and died.

    Disclaimer: The views I express here are personal and are based upon the (possibly rather naive) thoughts of a preclinical medic whos done about as much clinical attachment as the average joe on a Rheumaholiday ward. If you dont like these views thats just fine.
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    (Original post by martin101)
    You cannot give out personal details regardless of how well you know the people in question - unless there is a medical reason to let them know. Even within a hospital you cant just go round giving out details/notes. Regardless you probably dont actually know unless it really is a tiny hospital, though thats besides the point.



    Do NOT ever ever ever ever do a proceedure you are not familiar/confident/competent to do as chances are youll **** it up and hurt someone = black mark on your record. If a doctor gets you to do something (especially if hes a houseman) tell him to go do it himself or even better to SHOW you (after all these guys should be competent by now)... OK so they dont have masses of time to go round teaching nurses but it doesnt hurt to be a bit cheeky :P

    Having good feedback from patients. This is the number one factor that you can use to determine if youre doing it right. If the patients recover and have a reasonably good hospital experience then theyll (most of the time) thank you for it. The only way this is going to happen consistently is by having a good team, good organisation, good communication for handovers and by everyone realising their part in the game.

    Obviously its totally essential. If theres a patient lying there you need to not only be able to talk to them about what you want them to do, but just as importantly, possibly more importantly (definately more importantly from the perspective of your patient getting better) you need to be able to accurately inform other carers (doctors other nurses etc) about the state of each and every patient - its no good getting home at night and realising Mr Smith's cannula fell out but you didnt tell anyone, as little did you know that the little bag of goodies he was hooked up to was maintaining his electrolyte levels so when you walk in in the morning you find hes had an arrest and died.

    Disclaimer: The views I express here are personal and are based upon the (possibly rather naive) thoughts of a preclinical medic whos done about as much clinical attachment as the average joe on a Rheumaholiday ward. If you dont like these views thats just fine.

    Nahh thats good, I like how you've included the patient as part of the tieam..will take note of that
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    anyone else?
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    I was just wondering if you have to be interested in a career of nursing to become a nursing assistant for a gap year?

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