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Know any good diet plans / meal planners?

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    I've looked around on the net for this but havent found anything. I pretty much want a full meal by meal plan for bulking. I always struggle to eat properly or sustain eating, so i just need to know what to eat and when throughtout the week, a full diet. Does anyone know where i can get such a tool?
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    eat load of proteins and forget about carbs and you will lose weight in months.
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    (Original post by Diaz89)
    eat load of proteins and forget about carbs and you will lose weight in months.
    As my original post states i'm looking to bulk up, not lose weight.
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    Read the goddam sticky.
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    Geez i've read the 'goddam sticky' which was why I then came to post, seeing as i could find what i wanted. Why is the fitness forum so hostile all the time.
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    Too much exercise. Makes them cranky.
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    Why is the fitness forum so hostile all the time.
    Yeah I've kinda noticed this too. I find some of these fitness people scary :o:
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    I've looked around on the net for this but havent found anything. I pretty much want a full meal by meal plan for bulking. I always struggle to eat properly or sustain eating, so i just need to know what to eat and when throughtout the week, a full diet. Does anyone know where i can get such a tool?
    Everyone is different, gender, age, activity level, what foods they like/dislike, food budget, etc, it is impossible to design a specific diet and say for certain that said person will gain weight to the best of their ability.

    As has been explained in the sticky, it is relatively easy to devise a diet routine by trial and error. Using the meal proportion guidelines (1/4 protein, 1/4 carbs, 1/4 veg) and meal frequency (4-6 meals every 2-3 hours) you create a diet. If you don't gain weight and you want to, it is very simple, you increase the size of your food proportions until you gain weight.

    (Original post by BioSam)
    Yeah I've kinda noticed this too. I find some of these fitness people scary :o:
    The problem is that most people don't seem to realise that we do this 'job' in our spare time, we don't get paid, we don't have to give advice, and we don't have to take the **** from the people who really don't know what they're talking about.

    What pisses us off is lazy people asking the same repetitive questions day in, day out, which have been answered innumerable times, they expect us to do all of the leg work and create them a personalised plan, it is a waste of our time. *Hint* That is why the Fitness Sticky was created.
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    (Original post by Lady Venom)
    Read the goddam sticky.
    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)

    The problem is that most people don't seem to realise that we do this 'job' in our spare time, we don't get paid, we don't have to give advice, and we don't have to take the **** from the people who really don't know what they're talking about.

    What pisses us off is lazy people asking the same repetitive questions day in, day out, which have been answered innumerable times, they expect us to do all of the leg work and create them a personalised plan, it is a waste of our time. *Hint* That is why the Fitness Sticky was created.
    OK, but as you say, you aren't obliged to do this at all. Don't get me wrong, it's great that knowledgeable people are about when you need them, but I'd understand some of the hostility more if you were given no option but to respond to every thread. Why not just ignore the repetitive questions? I'm sure they will, in time, be answered by someone who finds them less stressful, or else be consigned to the depths of page two and beyond, where you don't have to suffer them.
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    (Original post by BioSam)
    OK, but as you say, you aren't obliged to do this at all. Don't get me wrong, it's great that knowledgeable people are about when you need them, but I'd understand some of the hostility more if you were given no option but to respond to every thread. Why not just ignore the repetitive questions? I'm sure they will, in time, be answered by someone who finds them less stressful, or else be consigned to the depths of page two where you don't have to suffer them.
    The problem is that if the more 'knowledgeable' members pulled out from bothering to reply to the repetitive threads, numpties would come out of the woodwork and start giving out poor, or even dangerous, advice because it appears that no-one is giving out the necessary advice and/or telling the OP who is wrong and why.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    The problem is that if the more 'knowledgeable' members pulled out from bothering to reply to the repetitive threads, numpties would come out of the woodwork and start giving out poor, or even dangerous, advice because it appears that no-one is giving out the necessary advice and/or telling the OP who is wrong and why.
    True enough I guess.
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    I've looked around on the net for this but havent found anything. I pretty much want a full meal by meal plan for bulking. I always struggle to eat properly or sustain eating, so i just need to know what to eat and when throughtout the week, a full diet. Does anyone know where i can get such a tool?
    As a basis you could use www.mealplansite.com, but you'd be much better creating your own. Try one of their sample diets, monitor your weight and energy levels and adjust exercise and portions accordingly. Change around the foods for other similar ones so you don't get bored. Eat (c)lean. Eat big.

    Only you can adequately analyse your own needs.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    The problem is that if the more 'knowledgeable' members pulled out from bothering to reply to the repetitive threads, numpties would come out of the woodwork and start giving out poor, or even dangerous, advice because it appears that no-one is giving out the necessary advice and/or telling the OP who is wrong and why.
    Then why isn't H&R more aggressive? The same applies.
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    (Original post by Poica)
    Then why isn't H&R more aggressive? The same applies.
    Telling someone to read a file and/or website before they post isn't exactly 'aggressive'.

    As for H&R, when I have braved it you do get your fair share of muppets dishing out abuse and trolling, the thing is that H&R is more heavily moderated so offensive/dangerous posts are deleted or changed quicker.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Telling someone to read a file and/or website before they post isn't exactly 'aggressive'.

    As for H&R, when I have braved it you do get your fair share of muppets dishing out abuse and trolling, the thing is that H&R is more heavily moderated so offensive/dangerous posts are deleted or changed quicker.
    People can easily read the sticky and not find things useful and ask for help, and still get Lady Venom and other major fitness forum contributors saying "Read the goddam sticky" rather than any other suggestions. Yes the sticky is helpful, but it is not the be all and end all of advice by any means. There are no diet plans or meal planners in the sticky, and that is what the OP is after - if they don't exist then why not say that?

    Surely if the knowledgable members shouting "read the sticky" pulled out and were replaced by numpties giving stupid/dangerous/abusive advice then fitness would become more heavily moderated?
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    (Original post by Poica)
    People can easily read the sticky and not find things useful and ask for help, and still get Lady Venom and other major fitness forum contributors saying "Read the goddam sticky" rather than any other suggestions. Yes the sticky is helpful, but it is not the be all and end all of advice by any means. There are no diet plans or meal planners in the sticky, and that is what the OP is after - if they don't exist then why not say that?
    What is this then?

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1&postcount=20

    OK, it isn't a 'plan' in so much as it doesn't explain exact quantities and/or meals, at what times, etc, but it's a pretty comprehensive explanation of how to eat a healthy diet, what to eat and in what proportions, for whatever aim (gain weight/muscle, lose weight/fat, maintain your weight, etc).

    As has been said already that is pointless listing out an exact routine because someone's demand depends entirely on their exercise level, gender, age, etc, but also their likes and dislikes come into play.

    If someone details a diet based heavily around beetroot and turkey, if said person doesn't like beetroot and/or turkey, they're not going to stick to it. It is much better to have a good framework and simply substitute in what that person likes/has available. Equally if that person is very inactive and someone provides a diet for an average/active person, it isn't going to be in their best interests because they stand to gain a lot of fat. At the end of the day any 'plan' is just going to be an estimate, it would be just as easy to eat a healthy diet in the correct proportions and then increase/decrease portion sizes depending on whether the person's weight increases/decreases over the course of a week or so (trial and error).

    OP:
    1. Read the section on HEALTHY EATING.
    2. Follow the instructions and eat a healthy diet.
    3. Adjust the food volume after a week or two, if necessary (ie; if you aren't gaining weight after a week, increase your portion sizes and/or meal frequency until you do start gaining weight).
    4. Bingo! Weight gain.
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    Choc, can we get berardis 7 habits of nutrition in the sticky? might stop people asking this kinda stuff. Link here http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/...on/7habits.htm
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    (Original post by Stevo_Mc)
    Choc, can we get berardis 7 habits of nutrition in the sticky? might stop people asking this kinda stuff. Link here http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/...on/7habits.htm
    Your welcome to add to it


    Post it somewhere, there was a contribution thread you can post in, then LV will link it in the sticky mate
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    (Original post by Double Agent)
    I've looked around on the net for this but havent found anything. I pretty much want a full meal by meal plan for bulking. I always struggle to eat properly or sustain eating, so i just need to know what to eat and when throughtout the week, a full diet. Does anyone know where i can get such a tool?
    Here you go Double Agent. I expect rep


    (Original post by Myprotein 'Muscle and Size')
    There are 3 main parts to a good bulking program: Training, diet and rest. All areas are covered within this section.

    I remember the first time I tried to bulk up. It was just after summer and I had been sitting at around 8% body fat for about a year, I had been training for a while but had no appreciable muscle mass and weighed about 10stone (64kg). I had been reading around Internet forums for advice and, unwisely, decided to go for the "eat, eat, eat, then eat some more" technique. For two months I gorged myself on sweets, biscuits, chocolate and rubbish food I could get my hands on, not caring about the amount of protein, carbohydrates (especially sugars) and fats. I must have been eating around 5000calories a day and probably 3000 of those were from junk, the rest from the meals that were prepared for me by my mum (which were semi decent at best by bodybuilding standards). Needless to say, I got very, very fat. I put on 2stone 2lbs(14kg) in those two months, probably only four or five of those pounds being muscle. That meant 25lbs was fat and I was 12stone and nearly 20% body fat. This obviously was not a good bulk, in fact, it was a terrible bulk and I vowed to myself I would never do that again. After that terrible bulk I did lose a lot of the weight, got myself to about 180lbs at 12% body fat and did a lot more research into how to bulk correctly. I managed to slowly, over the course of 40weeks or so bulk my way up to 210lbs at approximately 15% body fat.

    I tried a lot of different techniques along the way and by far my favourite was the slow and steady method, weighing myself once a week and ensuring I was gaining 0.5-1lb a week. I did intersperse cutting phases during that time, when I did get a little too fat for my liking but I never got huge. The highest body fat I allowed myself to get was around 15%, and then I would do a quick cut and get back on the bulking trail again. This article will outline, what in my opinion is the best way to diet in order to gain muscle mass and not become overly fat.

    Firstly we must ensure you know the basics. The 3 main macronutrient groups: Protein, carbohydrate (which is subdivided into 2 main categories which I will describe later) and fats (which can also be subdivided into different categories).

    Protein is arguably the most important macronutrient. If you don't eat enough protein you just wont grow. Most people get around 80g protein per day from their diet. This is not enough for bodybuilders. You should be looking in the region of 1-1.5grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. For a 10stone person this is 140-210g of protein per day. For an 180lb person this is 180-270g of protein per day. The reason for this is that our muscle fibres are made mainly of amino acids (the building blocks of proteins). When we workout the muscle fibres are damaged and the amino acids we eat are needed to rebuild larger, stronger fibres. This at the most basic level is how muscles grow.

    I advise you split the protein between the 5-6 meals you will be eating per day, about a fifth of the total amount in each meal. Don't sweat it if it isn't exactly the correct amount, as long as you have the correct total for the day. It also gets a little more complicated when you consider workout and non-workout days, but we will come to this a little later.

    Next come carbohydrates, the second most important macronutrient. Carbohydrates are separated into 2 main subcategories, simple and complex. Simple (fast digesting) carbohydrates, the kind found in most sweets and refined foods such as white pasta, rice, potatoes and bread. These should be avoided at all times except (some would say) post workout, which we will come to later. The second, and much more important group are the complex (slow digesting) carbohydrates such as sweet potato, any wholemeal variety of rice, pasta or bread and my personal favourite, oats. The complex carbohydrates are digested slowly and give you a slow steady stream of energy throughout the day, as opposed to quick energy spikes and drops, which you would get from eating simple carbohydrates. I would advise roughly 2-3grams of (mostly complex) carbohydrates per pound of bodyweight, depending on if you are working out on that day or not. This equates to 300-450g for a 150lb person or 360-540g for an 180lb person. These should be mainly structured around workouts, which I will come to later.

    The last macronutrient group is the fats, which I will subdivide for simplicity into 2 categories: Good (mono and polyunsaturated) and bad (saturated). The exact type should be printed on the back of the food in the nutritional information section. Failing that, simply looking at the food you can make a good guess. If the fat is solid, such as butters and lard it is probably mostly bad, if it is a liquid (such as sunflower or vegetable oil) it is probably mostly good fat. I would aim to get around 0.5grams of fat per pound of bodyweight. 80+% from good sources and the rest from bad sources. This equates to 75g for a 150lb person and 90g for an 180lb person. This, like protein should be pretty much even in each meal with the exception of pre/post workout where it should if possible be a little lower.

    Piecing all of this together, you may come out with a meal plan that looks something like this: I will assume you are 150lbs, wake up at 8AM, workout around 8PM and go to bed around 11PM.

    8AM
    100g (uncooked weight) oats
    300ml milk (skimmed)
    1 scoop WPC80 from myprotein.co.uk
    40/75/10/550(the values represent protein/carbohydrate/fat/total calories)

    10.30AM
    2 slices of wholemeal bread
    100g (raw weight) chicken breast
    Tomatoes/lettuce to taste
    Small handful of nuts (preferably almonds or peanuts)
    30/30/15/375

    1.00PM
    100g (uncooked weight) wholemeal pasta
    100g Chicken breast
    Small handful of nuts
    25/60/15/475

    3.30PM
    2 slices of wholemeal bread
    130g Tin of salmon
    Tomatoes/lettuce to taste
    30/30/15/375

    6.00PM (pre workout)
    100g oats
    300ml milk
    Small wholemeal roll
    1 scoop WPC80from myprotein.co.uk 40/100/10/650

    9PM (post workout)
    1.5scoops WPC80
    Either 60g dextrose or 100g ultra fine oats (from myprotein.co.uk)
    In a shaker bottle
    35/60/0 or 5/380 or 425(depending on if you had dextrose or oats)

    10PM (Pre bed)
    200g cottage cheese or 1.5scoops Milk protein concentrate from myprotein.co.uk
    2 small sweet potatoes (about 300g)
    Small handful of nuts
    30/70/15/535

    Totals for the day: 230/425/80 or 85/3340 or 3485

    Then on non-workout days you would have the same but without the post workout shake and less carbohydrates in the 6PM, possibly just by dropping the wholemeal roll. The totals for a non-workout days would become: 195/335/80/2830

    A heavier person should just scale up the size of the meals to reach his/her desired macronutrient intake and likewise a smaller person should scale it down.

    These values are not set in stone, as everyone' body is different. You should weigh yourself weekly, preferably on the same day before breakfast. If you are gaining less than 0.5-1lb per week then increase your intake of carbohydrates, preferably around workouts. If you are gaining over 1lb a week then decrease the amount of carbohydrates you are eating in the meals that are not around your workouts.

    The food choices are also not mandatory, you could easily replace a chicken breast with any lean cut of meat or fish (turkey, beef, tuna) or egg whites. Try to get the salmon in as it contains omega 3 fatty acids, which are very beneficial to the body for numerous reasons (cardiac health, insulin control). Likewise, you may eat any of the following as a source of carbohydrate:
    Wholemeal rice
    Wholemeal pasta
    Wholemeal bread
    Wholemeal Tortillas
    Oats, or any whole cereal grain (barley, wheat, rye)
    Sweet potatoes
    Yams

    If you have a nut allergy, or just don't like nuts they can be replaced by a tablespoonful of olive oil or any other source of good fat you can think of.
Updated: July 29, 2012
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