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Best Criminal and Tort Law book

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    Which one do you highly recommend? I will be starting tort and criminal law this upcoming term, hopefully I can get some feedback. thanks
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    I have "Tort" by Giliker ... I find it quite easy to understand and use.
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    J loveless is best for Criminal law..
    the 'unlocking' torts series by chrris turner is best for tort

    also, can i ask y ur status is Brum Law 2008-2010...is it a fast track degree??Only 2 yrs? thanks!
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    (Original post by charli159)
    J loveless is best for Criminal law..
    the 'unlocking' torts series by chrris turner is best for tort

    also, can i ask y ur status is Brum Law 2008-2010...is it a fast track degree??Only 2 yrs? thanks!
    thanks for the feedback....I am doing the 2 year LLB program at Brum.
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    Herring - Criminal Law TCM is a great book to use whilst you study the course. But, its not so detailed: you will need to be using journal articles to supplement to obtain the top grades.
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    I think Andrew Ashworth "priciples of criminal law" (think something like that anyway) is very good.

    I also read Clarkson and Keating which was also good but a more difficult read as it's more detailed.

    I also think that the nutcase case book is great for modules like crime and tort because they are so case orientated.
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    (Original post by LAW@BRUM)
    thanks for the feedback....I am doing the 2 year LLB program at Brum.
    No way, didn't know they did that at Brum!! Is that new?
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    I use Smith and Hogan Criminal Law (David Ormerod) and McBride & Bagshaw's Tort Law
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    Smith and Hogan saved me from failing Criminal law.. (whatever you do, dont buy Jefferson!!)
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    (Original post by charli159)
    No way, didn't know they did that at Brum!! Is that new?
    not sure if it is new,

    my options for tort law are the following:

    markesinis "tort law"
    giliker "tort"
    rodgers, winfield and jolowicz on tort
    steele "tort law:cases, texts and materials"
    Jones, "textbook on tort"

    decisions, I am hearing good things about steele's textbook
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    (Original post by charli159)
    No way, didn't know they did that at Brum!! Is that new?
    Its for graduates only
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    Smith and Hogan got me a 2:1, you should definitely get that.
    I like Murphy(Street on Torts) -very reader friendly, Winfield and Jolowicz is good too.
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    I use Strong & Williams for tort but for criminal law I brought the universites compiled book, compiled with chapters from; Smith & Hogan, Michael Allen, Andrew Ashworth and Herring. But the compiled book is not very user friendly(has not index, table of cases or statutes) so i may buy the Michael Alen textbook on criminal law.

    Does anyone know if the Eliott and Quinn on Criminal law is a good book to use, or is it more of a introductory book? Thanks
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    I used Olliphant for Torts. Its a wonderful book, but also happens to be huge.
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    Sorry to bring up a really old thread, but its probably better than creating a new one and I'm lazy too..

    Everyone just seems to have posted what they used/found helpful for themselves.. there isn't any descriptions here on which are more detailed, which explains in more depth etc.?

    Also are the 'Law Express' Series of books any good for brief/simple explanations and outlines? Their quite cheap and i was thinking might be good to help grasp the basics.
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    Go with whatever your university recommends - the course may follow the structure of a particular textbook.

    The Law Express / Nutshells series are quite good for understanding the basic principles of a subject but you would need to look at more detailed textbooks in order to pass the course.
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    Whatever floats your boat. Personally, I think nutshells and law express are an awful idea. They often aren't well written and some have mistakes/over-simplifications which end up making it harder to understand the subject than if you just went with a bigger textbook in the first place. I do like some of the "Core Text Series" however. But nutshells helps some people, whatever floats your boat.

    You do need to try different textbooks. Different people like different books. You can't rely on liking particular series. Different books in the same series are written by different people so can vary in quality, so even if they are all "Core Text Series" or whatever different books in the series will differ in approach/quality.
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    (Original post by Funguy)

    Does anyone know if the Eliott and Quinn on Criminal law is a good book to use, or is it more of a introductory book? Thanks
    I love this book! Their not detailed, but they are good for basic info and to get the ball rolling. I always had two books, one for introductory and one detailed and Elliot and Quinn were always unrivalled for introductory.
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    (Original post by anonymouz)
    Sorry to bring up a really old thread, but its probably better than creating a new one and I'm lazy too..

    Everyone just seems to have posted what they used/found helpful for themselves.. there isn't any descriptions here on which are more detailed, which explains in more depth etc.?

    Also are the 'Law Express' Series of books any good for brief/simple explanations and outlines? Their quite cheap and i was thinking might be good to help grasp the basics.
    I used Simester and Sullivan for Crime and thought it was very good. An explanation of concepts with a fairly detailed history of the case law, and also a good bit of theory and opinion thrown in there for good measure. Whatever floats you boat really.
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    Herring TCM + a couple of full articles each is week is all you need. The other criminal books (e.g. Simester and Sullivan) are far too detailed and engage in analysis that you will never be expected to do in an exam, especially if, like me, cirminal is a first year topic.
    Having said that, Ashworth's principles of criminal law is good bed time reading just because its short, clear and he makes some good points, but on the whole it is less detailed than Herring's.

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Updated: December 18, 2009
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