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What happens after you receive your LLB in Law?

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    Can someone please explain the timeline of events that follow once you complete an LLB in Law. I would like to understand the difference between a UK law degree and an American law degree in terms of requirements that must be met in order to commence employment.

    For example, in the US, law school is a three year post-graduate study in which you obtain your Juris Doctor. Prior to graduating, you prepare for the Bar exam. Upon passing the bar, you are eligible to practice law in whatever state you have passed the bar. Finding a job in the field you desire is the hard part.

    Thanks!
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    for law in england as a solicitor (this is presuming you get it all one after another) it's 3 years for your LLB, 1 year LPC, 2 years training contract, then you're a qualified solicitor

    for the bar I'm not so sure
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    in scotland, it's 4 years, then you do a 1 year diploma, then 2 years training contract.
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    For the Bar it is 3 years LLB, 1 year BVC. After you have passed your BVC and completed your sessions at an Inn, you are called to the Bar. You are then a Barrister (non practising). Then 1 year pupillage and you are a practising Barrister.

    EDIT: For England and Wales
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    Sorry, bit off topic..

    Kaisersalsek, did you end up landing a TC in the end?

    Best of luck
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    Thanks for the replies thus far. Im interested in LSE, Kings and UCL. How do they rank in terms of the law program?
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    (Original post by trishavt)
    Thanks for the replies thus far. Im interested in LSE, Kings and UCL. How do they rank in terms of the law program?
    High.

    LSE and UCL probably above KCL, but all three are right at the top.
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    Say I want to work in America after my degree. How would I go about that? Would I have to sit the LPC here? or? I haven't the foggiest to be honest any information would be greatly appreciated

    oh and quote me please or I won't know anyones replied!
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    (Original post by colly6191)
    Say I want to work in America after my degree. How would I go about that? Would I have to sit the LPC here? or? I haven't the foggiest to be honest any information would be greatly appreciated

    oh and quote me please or I won't know anyones replied!

    Hey Colly

    I dont know the specific steps one takes in the UK to make sure they are able to become a practicing attorney (barrister/solitictor) so I cant say at what point you are able to practice independent of supervision.

    Here in the US, in order to practice, one must attend law school and pass the bar exam. There are some exceptions to this rule. In some states, it is not necessary to attend law school in order to take the bar exam. See below.

    "Admission without law school
    In California, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington[3], an applicant who has not attended law school may take the bar exam after study under a judge or practicing attorney for an extended period of time. This method is known as "reading law" or "reading the law".

    New York requires that applicants who are reading the law must have at least one year of law school study. (See Rule 540.4 of the Rules of the Court of Appeals for the Admission of Attorneys.)

    Maine allows students with two years of law school to serve an apprenticeship in lieu of completing their third year."

    See for more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Admissi..._United_States

    Each state is different and the rules depend on where you want to practice. Either way, its a lengthy process without an accredited ABA law school degree.
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    I made a thread here discussing it.
    I hope it helps.
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    I made a thread here discussing it.
    I hope it helps.

    Hey
    Thanks for that link. It explains everything that I needed to know in terms of what is to follow after obtaining an LLB.
    Are you currently a law student? If so, where are you studying? What is the course structure like?

    Thanks!

    Trisha

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