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Oxford Chemistry Students and Applicants

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    At most colleges, the ratios are pretty favorable.
    And it is not too hard to get in if you are intelligent and have a decent academic record.

    No, you dont have to be a genius to do Chemistry
    The geniuses are doing E&M, Medicine or Law
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    I've heard that pure Chemistry is becoming less popular (ppl tend to do combined), is this true, and is it one of the reasons why the ration is more favourable?
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    Chemistry has been slowly dying for years. The mixed/related courses are harder to get into than Chemistry. However, they are more likely to lead to a fulfilling career and not just a job as a Chemistry teacher in a school.
    The brighter applicants tend to go into courses with a future like:
    Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular
    Percentage of successful applications over last three years: 36.8%
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/bioc.shtml

    In contrast:
    Chemistry
    Percentage of successful applications over last three years average: 47.6%
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/chem.shtml

    I would suggest that you consider Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular instead of Chemistry. Unless you really want to become a mere school teacher.
    That is a COMPLETE assertion. The pure Chemistry degree from Oxford prepares you for nearly anything - industry, research, academia, management consultancy, accounting and finance, the city, teaching, and Chemistry graduates are amoung the most favourably viewed by post grad medicine, vetinary medicine and civil service programs.

    Margaret Thatcher, arguably our most successful prime minister, was a graduate of the Oxford Chemistry department.

    So please have a clue about what you're talking about before you post complete rubbish. kthanxbi xx
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    Chemistry has been slowly dying for years. The mixed/related courses are harder to get into than Chemistry. However, they are more likely to lead to a fulfilling career and not just a job as a Chemistry teacher in a school.
    The brighter applicants tend to go into courses with a future like:
    Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular
    Percentage of successful applications over last three years: 36.8%
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/bioc.shtml

    In contrast:
    Chemistry
    Percentage of successful applications over last three years average: 47.6%
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/chem.shtml

    I would suggest that you consider Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular instead of Chemistry. Unless you really want to become a mere school teacher.
    Omg... I don't even want to start arguing with you.

    You are completely misleading people...
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    (Original post by DumberChild)
    That is a COMPLETE assertion. The pure Chemistry degree from Oxford prepares you for nearly anything - industry, research, academia, management consultancy, accounting and finance, the city, teaching, and
    You havent even started at university, have you ?
    The stuff you are mouthing is straight off the promotional web site. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    You havent even started at university, have you ?
    The stuff you are mouthing is straight off the promotional web site. :rolleyes:
    What - you have? Which university? What course?
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    You havent even started at university, have you ?
    The stuff you are mouthing is straight off the promotional web site. :rolleyes:
    They might not have started, but I'm in my 4th year here, so I think I know what I'm talking about. Only one person I know wants to be a school teacher out of all the people I know on the course. Also, she's top of the year :rolleyes:. Most people go into fulfilling, highly-paid jobs with prospects, and many go on to do PhDs.
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    You havent even started at university, have you ?
    The stuff you are mouthing is straight off the promotional web site. :rolleyes:
    No, I haven't started, but I chose to apply for this course after long, serious, extensive thought and research. So I think I know what I'm talking about. I know you don't, because you make such ignorant claims like "doing a Chemistry degree will only qualify you to be a schoolteacher".

    Out of interest, what degree are you studying for?
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    (Original post by DumberChild)
    No, I haven't started, but I chose to apply for this course after long, serious, extensive thought and research. So I think I know what I'm talking about. I know you don't, because you make such ignorant claims like "doing a Chemistry degree will only qualify you to be a schoolteacher".

    Out of interest, what degree are you studying for?
    I am betting - not chemistry.
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    Chemistry has been slowly dying for years. The mixed/related courses are harder to get into than Chemistry. However, they are more likely to lead to a fulfilling career and not just a job as a Chemistry teacher in a school.
    The brighter applicants tend to go into courses with a future like:
    Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular
    Percentage of successful applications over last three years: 36.8%
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/bioc.shtml

    In contrast:
    Chemistry
    Percentage of successful applications over last three years average: 47.6%
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/chem.shtml

    I would suggest that you consider Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular instead of Chemistry. Unless you really want to become a mere school teacher.

    You obviously have no idea what you're on about. Especially quoting statistics off a website.

    OP, it changes every year, and from college to college.
    This year was quite bad, apparantly. There was a surge of Chemistry applicants [about time really]. In St. Hilda's it was 15 for 4 places [a lot of those were telephone interviews], I think, but then lots of people turned up on the second day from other colleges.
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    Jurisprudence
    Typically lawyers, full of lies :P

    I would say it might depend on which college you apply to. The people at Merton seemed quite smart...
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    I would like to say, that I had been considering doing a degree in nanotechnology at the university of Copenhagen, but was adviced against doing so by the researchers I worked along with during the summer at the university of Lund. They told me not to do highly specialized undergraduate degrees since research might change direction in a few years and you will be stuck with a more or less useless degree. They told me, do but do either chemistry, physics or a combination. You need the fundaments first.

    With a degree in chemistry you can do research in many different areas, such as nanochemistry (yay!) spectroscopy, quantum chemistry (I don't know the specifics, but it is theoretical chemistry with computational chemistry) and so on. Chemistry is an excellent choice of degree (as compared to jurisprudence :P)
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    Jurisprudence
    Oh, recalling facts then? Unless of course you do it at an institution like Oxford or Cambridge, but I doubt that.
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    (Original post by DumberChild)
    Oh, recalling facts then? Unless of course you do it at an institution like Oxford or Cambridge, but I doubt that.
    I dont believe that law anywhere is "just recalling facts".
    In any case, BA Jurisprudence is Oxford's law degree.
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    I dont believe that law anywhere is "just recalling facts".
    In any case, BA Jurisprudence is Oxford's law degree.
    Does it even matter? It's the person that counts, not the degree.

    Your words are corrosive.
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    (Original post by acolyte)
    I dont believe that law anywhere is "just recalling facts".
    In any case, BA Jurisprudence is Oxford's law degree.
    Its also called Jurisprudence in certain Scottish universities. Anyway, you didn't answer my question. I refuse to believe that an Oxford-trained lawyer would make the kind of unfounded, ignorant assertions that you have.
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    I was wondering the following and would be very grateful for any assistance:

    I'm doing A-Level Mathematics and Chemistry at the moment, and already have two A-Levels in French and Biology at grades A and B, respectively. I am thinking of applying to Oxford (no idea what college yet) for Chemistry.

    Here's my concern though: How important is Physics at A-Level as a criteria? I hear mixed reviews regarding this and would be very grateful for any help. Are students heavily discriminated against if they don't do it.
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    (Original post by DumberChild)
    Its also called Jurisprudence in certain Scottish universities. Anyway, you didn't answer my question. I refuse to believe that an Oxford-trained lawyer would make the kind of unfounded, ignorant assertions that you have.
    Old thread, but acolyte may have based his comments on the fact that a some UK unis are shutting their chem departments because not enough people want to study the course to make it pay.
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    (Original post by Athena)


    Old thread, but acolyte may have based his comments on the fact that a some UK unis are shutting their chem departments because not enough people want to study the course to make it pay.
    Perhaps, but mouthing off something like
    I would suggest that you consider Biochemistry, Molecular and Cellular instead of Chemistry. Unless you really want to become a mere school teacher.
    is bound to attract trouble. My brother's just finished his MChem from Oxford and is now training with Goldman Sachs. So evidently the opportunities aren't just going into education sector.
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    How important is Physics at A-Level as a criteria?
    I think its fairly college specific. Some colleges view as essential, others as merely helpful. Check on their websites for details. For example,
    (Original post by Balliol)
    We believe that sixth formers studying chemistry, physics and mathematics at school have the best basis for success in the Oxford chemistry course, and we do not often admit students who do not have this background
    So Balliol view it as nearly essential

    (Original post by Jesus)
    A further Physical or Biological Science A2 or AS level would be helpful
    .

    I.E. only a slight advantage.

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