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I don't know how to revise!!

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    Prior to other panic threads, I'm going through slightly the same problem. However I'm not that worried about the time limit away from the exams, I'm more worried about revision technique because I don't know the best way to revise, so all of the stuff I have gone over has jus left my head and no I'm all blank.

    HELP! Any advice appreciated. Thanks
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    Hey, I think this would be a very good, and useful, thread to discuss everyone's individual revision techniques and methods; thus, everyone could learn from each other, and exchange ideas etc.

    First of all, I reckon you need to find out your "learning style", or, preference. For example, I am a mixture between an auditory learner, and a learner who likes to read and write. However, I personally believe everybody is a mixture of all learning styles. For example, occasionally I find visualisation the easiest method of revision, however, I wouldn't say I'm fond of it generally. Basically, you must decide what's best for you, you can do this by taking an online "Learning Preference" test. This will determine whether or not you learn best with sounds and noises, pictures and images, or words or movements etc.

    Another tip, is because I'm part auditory learner, I find that recording my notes onto my iPod really helps me, because I listen to my revision whenever (I always have my iPod!), and it helps me to remember things. Also, check out the Theory of Loci memory method. I find that works for me too. Of course, I do the usual, copy a page out, highlight it, write it out again method - I think this is failsafe, it works everytime - but it takes bloody ages!! You could try mind maps, although I'm not too keen on them. Or maybe try explaining your knowledge to friends and family, sometimes, by teaching them, you teach yourself!

    Anybody else like to share their techniques?
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    (Original post by zhivago)
    Hey, I think this would be a very good, and useful, thread to discuss everyone's individual revision techniques and methods; thus, everyone could learn from each other, and exchange ideas etc.

    First of all, I reckon you need to find out your "learning style", or, preference. For example, I am a mixture between an auditory learner, and a learner who likes to read and write. However, I personally believe everybody is a mixture of all learning styles. For example, occasionally I find visualisation the easiest method of revision, however, I wouldn't say I'm fond of it generally. Basically, you must decide what's best for you, you can do this by taking an online "Learning Preference" test. This will determine whether or not you learn best with sounds and noises, pictures and images, or words or movements etc.

    Another tip, is because I'm part auditory learner, I find that recording my notes onto my iPod really helps me, because I listen to my revision whenever (I always have my iPod!), and it helps me to remember things. Also, check out the Theory of Loci memory method. I find that works for me too. Of course, I do the usual, copy a page out, highlight it, write it out again method - I think this is failsafe, it works everytime - but it takes bloody ages!! You could try mind maps, although I'm not too keen on them. Or maybe try explaining your knowledge to friends and family, sometimes, by teaching them, you teach yourself!

    Anybody else like to share their techniques?



    I read it from my exercise books, write shortened notes on it, read it in a special revision book (letts or cgp), then read over my shortened notes n hope 4 the best.......
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    I read my course books, make notes for myself like my own revision notes, they're like a page and a half or less for each topic. I use post its, coloured ones so i'm actually interested.
    Okay this may sound all immature and childish and i used to do this in the 5th grade. You cud talk it all out. Explain it to urself outloud. It works!!!
    or make songs out of stuff... thats fun revising!!!
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    Well I got pretty decent GCSE results last year. To be honest, I still don't think I revised well enough, but basically I used factualy recall - just constantly tested myself. I found it impossible to revise English Lit/Lang though. Science, Math, History, just read your notes, do practice papers, test your mates.

    Most important piece of advice?

    Chill out. Don't stress. I thought it was the end of the world last year, it is sooooo stressful, it's horrible. BUT if worst comes to worst, you can resit! And nobody need ever know. Besides, when you stress out you panic, and you start forgetting things, you start waffling - You start failing!

    hope I've helped :-)

    Feel free to PM me ;-)
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    My technique is to just WRITE. Jot down notes from your exercise book or folder, (preferablly on some coloured revision cards, there only £1.50 frm whsmith). And then just sit down and read through the notes/cards. If you feel your weak on a certain topic then, then go back to the topic and re-write notes.
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    I used a lot of revision guides at GCSE (I found CGP and Letts the best). Obviously it depends on the subject, but generally I just wrote out all my notes, then condensed them until I just had a page or less or some revision cards for each topic. Explaining it to someone, or just talking to yourself out loud, helps a lot as well. Oh, and past papers to make sure your technique is good.
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    I would recommend you to read your notes and textbooks, then write them out again to see if you get them right or wrong. In addition, spend 1-2 hours each day for the time being and increase the hours when it gets near the exam period. Furthermore, you should revise the stuff learnt yesterday for the next day and so on, so you won't forget the stuff you learn yesterday and before. Lastly, doing some past papers would be a good idea, as you get use to the style of questions asked. Some questions might appear again, you never know!

    I got some sites for you to order past papers:

    AQA - I'll post AQA later on as the website does not work
    OCR - catelogue - http://www.ocr.org.uk/OCR/WebSite/Da...003%200903.pdf
    Order form - http://www.ocr.org.uk/OCR/WebSite/Da...t/ReadMe11.pdf
    Edexcel - catelogue - http://www.edexcel.org.uk/Content.aspx?id=213705
    Order form - http://www.edexcel.org.uk/Content.aspx?id=68362

    I remember posting those websites many time, lol.
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    Experiment, do whatever feels most comfortable.

    Try every method people throw at you and see which feels the best.

    Just remember not to do too much revision, GCSE's are actually as easy as people tell you, don't worry.
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    I'm a write notes notes/ read notes/ learn notes/ write out notes type person, though I also record alot of my revision notes onto tapes.
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    I read a revision page, copy it out, and condense the most important bits onto revision cards. I make brainstorms and mind maps, and also write things I might forget on Post-Its and make posters and put them round the house. I even made a revision screensaver, hehe!! I have tried doing the auditory thing and putting revision notes on tape but I hate my own voice (the sound of it)
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    I read a revision page, copy it out, and condense the most important bits onto revision cards. I make brainstorms and mind maps, and also write things I might forget on Post-Its and make posters and put them round the house. I even made a revision screensaver, hehe!! I have tried doing the auditory thing and putting revision notes on tape but I hate my own voice (the sound of it)
    Lol, so do I! (Doesn't everybody!), which is why I don't use my own voice - I download a text-to-speech reader programme from the internet, that reads all my notes from the PC for me. Works like hell. Takes time though, but doesn't all revision! Dammit!
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    Is this free, this text reader? If so where from?
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    Unfortuently not. My Dad's got the software for it over the internet, it costs like $69 USD. I don't know how much that is in sterling. He uses it a lot though for his work though, so was worth the price.
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    Hmm, I'll have a search and see if I can find anything. Thanks anyway
Updated: April 11, 2005
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