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Applying to Uni? Let Universities come to you. Click here to get your perfect place 20-10-2014
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Yep, Benedict School it is. I still need to book my flight and get my insurance sorted out for my visa, there's so much to do! I have no idea what I want to do for my year abroad. I study Spanish as well, and at the moment my Spanish is obviously substantially better than my Russian (I've had 8 years of teaching as opposed to 16 weeks!) but we'll see how the exams go and how I feel later. I think Cambridge like it if we specialise in third year rather than trying to split it between two languages, so we'll seeeee. How long will you be in Russia for? A couple of my friends are coming back from Vienna today after two weeks of language schooling
    I've been told by a friend from school (doing Dutch and French at Cam) that you basically have to spend your third year in one country, they really don't like it if you do two. My German is still substantially better than my Russian :p: and probably always will be, oh well... I'm staying here until the very beginning of June, then back to England for a week then gallivanting off. What language school were they at? I'm going to one in summer but I haven't picked for deffo yet.
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    (Original post by thatwhichiam)
    I've been told by a friend from school (doing Dutch and French at Cam) that you basically have to spend your third year in one country, they really don't like it if you do two. My German is still substantially better than my Russian :p: and probably always will be, oh well... I'm staying here until the very beginning of June, then back to England for a week then gallivanting off. What language school were they at? I'm going to one in summer but I haven't picked for deffo yet.
    Yeah, that's what I've been told. It's minimum three months in any one country and minimum 8 months abroad in total, but we're meant to specialise in language papers in 4th year, so it does make quite a lot of sense to spend the vast majority of that in one country. Not the foggiest about the language school I'm afraid

    Eep, still struggling with this verbs of motion. I'm trying to translate sentences like 'We were driving around town' and 'The children are running about in the garden' - what preposition do you need to use to communicate 'around'? Is using the right verb of motion enough? Because I know you use по for 'along', but I can't for the life of me remember how to say 'around'
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Yeah, that's what I've been told. It's minimum three months in any one country and minimum 8 months abroad in total, but we're meant to specialise in language papers in 4th year, so it does make quite a lot of sense to spend the vast majority of that in one country. Not the foggiest about the language school I'm afraid

    Eep, still struggling with this verbs of motion. I'm trying to translate sentences like 'We were driving around town' and 'The children are running about in the garden' - what preposition do you need to use to communicate 'around'? Is using the right verb of motion enough? Because I know you use по for 'along', but I can't for the life of me remember how to say 'around'
    po would be the preposition - I think it takes the dative but I might be wrong - however I'd probably say v sadoo. Don't use the po as a prefix though :p:
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    Ah, v would probably work. Would it then be na for the town one? Thanks And po does take the dative. I appear to have forgotten all of my case endings, whoops...
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Ah, v would probably work. Would it then be na for the town one? Thanks And po does take the dative. I appear to have forgotten all of my case endings, whoops...
    Think it would be po for the town one rather than na, not entirely sure why...I think it just sounds right.
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    (Original post by thatwhichiam)
    Think it would be po for the town one rather than na, not entirely sure why...I think it just sounds right.
    I concur.
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    Excellent, thanks guys I had a major freak out about the next page of my VoM booklet, but then relaxed when I realised it was prefixed verbs of motion and I hadn't just missed out on learning something.

    Ahh, Russian. I love Russian Tolstoi times now!
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    (Original post by Zoedotdot)
    Excellent, thanks guys I had a major freak out about the next page of my VoM booklet, but then relaxed when I realised it was prefixed verbs of motion and I hadn't just missed out on learning something.

    Ahh, Russian. I love Russian Tolstoi times now!

    around - means in russian 'вокруг' (vokrug) and 'по' (po) on/at something
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    I've been doing quite abit of Russian the last few days and whilst doing some grammar about adjectives I think i've become stumped. Am I suppose to learn where the stress is placed for every word that is stressed ?
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    With long form adjectives the stress is always fixed on either stem or ending - you'll know if it's meant to be on the ending because the masculine nominative singular form will end in -ой. My book gives the example of болшой (stress indicated by bold), which becomes болшого, because it's the first syllable of a two syllable ending that takes the stress.

    Short form adjectives are more complicated. My book says there are three main patterns:

    1. Stress fixed on the stem: красив, красива, красиво, красивы
    2. Stress fixed on the ending: хорош, хорошa, хорошо, хорошы
    3. Stress on the ending in the feminine and the stem in the other forms: прав, правa, право, праы

    So the general gist is that there are definite patterns that will make learning them easier, but yes, basically you just have to learn them
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    Boooooooooooooooooooo (thank you)

    The book I have says.

    (Original post by Textbook)

    Types of adjectives . In the singular these have a separate form for each gender as follows.

    Spelling rule: The vowel Ы must be replaced by И, after Г,К,Х,Ж,Ш,Щ,Ч

    Normal type:
    Endings M: -ЫЙ N: -oe F: АЯ

    Exception of masculine singular form when Г,К,Х,Ж,Ш,Щ,Ч is before ЫЙ
    That's cool and I understand that.

    (Original post by Nasty bit of textbook)
    Spelling rule: Unstressed o cannot follow ж,ч,ш,щ,ц. It must be replaced by e.

    The remaining types of adjectives

    Unstressed endings following Ж,Ш,Щ,Ч

    Endings: M: ИЙ N: ЕЕ F: АЯ

    All adjectives with stressed endings


    Endings: M: О́Й N: OЕ F: AЯ
    I'm guessing they're talking about the nominative singular of adjectives.

    I guess that means I have to remember the stresses too ? :puppyeyes:.


    Then it goes on to talk about soft adjectives. What is the definition of a soft adjective ?

    I also do not the definition of short/long form adjectives, but bearing in mind i'm on chapter 4 of my book so...


    Also I love it how in the first post it has members, literally everyone is doing Russian at university (or potential) and then you have like 2 aberdeen medics.
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    всем привет! что нового? Я хочу изучатЬ русски язык потому что ето красиви язык.
    I apologise for the spelling mistakes. Has anyone here been to MGU?
    до встречи ребята
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    всем привет.
    I'm attempting to learn Russian for fun at uni, since it's such a beautiful language. I just wish there wasn't so much of it to learn. Does anyone have any easyish ways of learning all the case endings because I always forget them
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    Hey.

    I thought I would 'join' this thread since, while I don't do Russian any more, I loved it while I did, and would like to pick it up again some time in the near future before I forget too much.

    (Original post by suneilr)
    Does anyone have any easyish ways of learning all the case endings because I always forget them
    When I stopped learning, I knew most, but not all, of the case endings - I had a sheet in the front of my folder detailing each case ending, including the exceptions, and I'd glance at that if I forgot one. It does come with practice. Or, I suppose, a blitz memory session. I never did that. Like my teacher said, though, повторение - мать учения.
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    I am going to be particpiating in this thread :]

    I intend to get serious on my russian learning again, once Ive finished these med exams in June. But I will keep awatch and then no doubt bombard people with questions once I start again :p:
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    (Original post by Adje)
    Hey.

    I thought I would 'join' this thread since, while I don't do Russian any more, I loved it while I did, and would like to pick it up again some time in the near future before I forget too much.

    When I stopped learning, I knew most, but not all, of the case endings - I had a sheet in the front of my folder detailing each case ending, including the exceptions, and I'd glance at that if I forgot one. It does come with practice. Or, I suppose, a blitz memory session. I never did that. Like my teacher said, though, повторение - мать учения.
    Could you scan and post that sheet on to here? Pretty please
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    Privyet! I'm sparks, I'm not a russian beginner, but have been doing it for the last two years and am post A-Level, 3 at the end of this academic year. I'm currently studying it at uni, alongside italian and spanish. Just wanted to see what you do here really. So :erm:....:hi:

    If anyone needs any help with russki, feel free to PM and I'll do my best
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    Hi guys!

    I am Russian.
    It is so cool that u are learning our language!

    I would be happy to help u, if u want me to =)
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    Meh, participles and gerunds tonight. And uses of unidirectional verbs of motion in frequentative situations, good times...
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    I finally studied prefixed verbs of motion and actually discovered French also had perfective and imperfective (kind of) which I hope is gonna make it easier :king1:

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