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Working while doing a Masters- how many hours?

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    Hello!

    I am fortunate enough that my current employers are keen to keep me on next year while I do my masters, on a part time/flexi time basis. However they want to know how many hours I can commit to a week (approx) and my uni says about 10 maximum. I basically want to work as much as I can without it detrimentally affecting my studies- I know that this is usually dependent on what degree etc you do…but is 10 hours realistic?

    Many thanks

    S
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    I've been working 8 hours a week and that's been pushing it at times, especially during busy deadline/writing periods. It really depends on how many hours your course is as mine was only 6 hours of contact time a week.
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    (Original post by apotoftea)
    I've been working 8 hours a week and that's been pushing it at times, especially during busy deadline/writing periods. It really depends on how many hours your course is as mine was only 6 hours of contact time a week.
    Hi

    Thanks for the reply. I think I have about 6 hours of contact time as well. Umm Im not really sure what to do- anything less than 10 hours would automatically mean I have to stay with my parents, but then I'd rather stay with my parents then struggle to eat/work/study. Ahhh decisions decisions......
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    Depends how organised you are - I worked 15-21 hrs a week during my final year of undergrad and still got a 2.1 (don't think I could have got a First in any circumstances anyway), so felt I was perfectly willing and able to work 10-15 hours a week during postgrad. Unfortunately nobody would hire me as it seems that too many employers in Oxford are scared of getting into trouble with the university, so you're lucky to already have something to go to. I'd say 15 hours, tops.
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    I did MSc over 3 years whilst working; also married with 3 children. I did 20 units at a time, which was supposed to be 200 hours in the term including lectures and revision. Winter and Spring terms for 3 years for taught modules, then summer in final year was 60 units, so 600 hours.
    The amount of work that you need to put in depends on how much prior knowledge you have of the subject matter. My MSc course was closely related to my field of work, and therefore I spent fewer hours than average on private study.
    Also a lot of overseas students on my course for whom English was a second language; so as native English speaker this also contributed to me needing fewer hours as I was able to speed read etc.
    Coursework I tended to do at night after the children were in bed; working through 'til 2am, and then snatching 5 hours sleep before getting up for a day at work. Reading I would whenever I had a moment. Give up Sudokus, reading fiction books etc.
    Hardest time was when I was doing my dissertation. I was able to do my data collection at work, but I had to take additional unpaid leave in order to do the write-up.
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    Have re-read original post and realise that you want study fulltimie, and work part-time, rather than the other way round.

    If you are studying fulltime, then try not to have outside work if you can get by. It's the last chance you'll get for a long time to have this luxury. Explore available grants. I had an EPSRC grant which was worth £10,000 plus fees for a fulltime British student.
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    I was hoping to do about 10 - 15. Luckily this only work out to be one or two hours a day plus an afternoon at weekends. I can't see this being a major problem. It just means working through my lunch break and putting an hour in before I go to bed.
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    i did 20 hours a week whilst doing a full time MA at warwick in international relations. i also lived about 1.5 hours away so had to commute everyday. during the taught section i did about 3/4 hours of reading a week, they recommend at least 40 but i dont get why.

    i got a good grade and passed easily. however i needed the job because i took out a loan to pay for my MA and had direct debits, and also had to pay for car costs and petrol throughout the year.

    i wouldnt recommend having a job, but if you have no choice financially, then with a bit of prioritising and shuffling your workload you should be fine.
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    Thanks guys for all the advice....

    I ideally wouldn't be working but failed to get any funding and while this means Ill be living at home, I'll still need some money for travel/food/books etc. I've discussed it with my employer and hes happy with me to work for 30-40 hours a month for the first few months and Ill take it from there. Fingers crossed!

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