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  • Personal Statement:Mathematics 3

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Mathematics Personal Statement

Maths has always best my first and foremost favourite subject since I was introduced to the most basic concepts of maths from an early age by my father. Such an early start has allowed me to develop my own interest in the subject in my own time. Not only do I enjoy the challenge of problem solving, but I also take great satisfaction upon arriving at the correct answer. Although the majority of maths is done in school, I also spend a certain proportion of my own leisure time to examine mathematical problems from "www.nrich.maths.org.com", as well as the booklet "Advanced Problems in Mathematics" by Dr S.T.C. Siklos

Over the last couple of years, I have seen the importance and relevance that mathematical techniques have in everyday life, and I believe that further enhancement of my knowledge in this subject would allow me to be more successful in my future career. I believe that I am well equipped to follow this programme, as I am currently studying A-Level Mathematics and AS- Level Further Mathematics, taking modules in Pure Maths, Statistics, and Mechanics. I consider the course to be suitable as the extra year gives me the opportunity to study the subject with a greater level of specialisation, which is ideal if I wish to pursue a career as a professional Mathematician. I consider that the versatility of a mathematics degree will allow me to widen the scope of future career paths instead of restricting me to a particular to one. The Master of Mathematics choice also allows me to tailor the programme to suit my personal area of interest, which is Pure Mathematics

By attending a couple of the maths taster courses held on offer by the University of London Summer Schools programme, confirmed that I would like to pursue a career in the field of Mathematics; perhaps as a professional mathematician or as an accountant, as this is a field that I am particularly considering

The two taster courses I attended, ("Exploring Mathematics", a two day event held at Royal Holloway and "Women in Mathematics"held at UCL) not only allowed me to gain a greater sense of independency but also shows my commitment to the subject

Outside of the entire maths field, I have shown commitment by attending Chinese- Cantonese lessons on a weekly basis at a Chinese School in central London from the age of 4 and only recently stopped attending. In a previous Summer job at 'The Chinese Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture Centre' not only did I gain a greater understanding and insight into the herbal medicinal trade, but I also learnt the basics of conversational Mainland Chinese. Outside of the family, I have put by Cantonese lingual skills to practise on holidays to Hong Kong as well as at 'New World Noodle House'

The varied nature of my previous paid employment has given me a wider view of the different vocations as well as sustained my self- sufficiency. This summer, spent at a telemarketing company, 'Business Advantage', as well as being an active part of the 'Sixth Form Council'and 'Think Force', has made me more confident in expressing my opinions, and enhanced my listening skills

During my time in the Sixth Form I have given some service back to the school. I was previously Prefect in Year 11 and was also a 'Big Sister' in the school's 'Big brother, Big Sister' scheme which enables the interaction between the upper and lower schools, as well as help the lower years settle into the school. I find this work rewarding, especially as it is entirely selfless.

Comments

General Comments:

This PS requires a lot of work. It focuses too much on "doing it for the career", so it doesn’t convey any of the applicant’s actual interest or love of maths beyond they like pure maths, which they've not extended to say why. It is important to mention specific areas of interest and explicitly discuss why they interest you. There is too much focus on extracurricular activities at the expense of mathematics: at least 2/3 of the PS should be specifically about mathematics.

Comments on the statement:

Maths has always this can’t be true, as it would technically mean since being a baby best my first and foremost favourite subject since I was introduced to the most basic concepts of maths from an early age by my father. This sentence is awkwardly worded Such an early start has allowed me to develop my own interest in the subject in my own time. Surely all [UK based] children have an early introduction to maths when they're 3 years old at nursery school? And anyway, it’s not important how early the interest started, what’s important is that it is still the case now. Not only do I enjoy the challenge of problem solving, but I also take great satisfaction upon arriving at the correct answer. Why do you enjoy both of these? loving the process is just as important as getting the right answer. Although the majority of maths is done in school, I also spend a certain proportion of my own leisure time to examine mathematical problems from "www.nrich.maths.org.com", as well as the booklet "Advanced Problems in Mathematics" by Dr S.T.C. Siklos. need a full stop at the end of a paragraph.

The website bit can go, as well as the book. If they are staying, they shouldn't be in the introduction, for one, but it doesn't really say much about the applicant’s engagement with maths. The intro is the place to place an interest in context - where did their interest come from and why? They've hinted at this with their father, but this can be extended, as all kids are introduced to maths very early, so what was it about their father's take and presentation of maths which made them love it? As this is the part that doesn't happen to all children, not the being introduced to maths part.

Over the last couple of years, I have seen the importance and relevance that mathematical techniques have in everyday life, like? and I believe that further enhancement of my knowledge in this subject would allow me to be more successful in my future career. Why? What do you want to be? Anything related to maths or just that a good grasp of maths is needed for any career? Although, to be honest, it’s best to just focus on interest in the degree, rather than usefulness in future careers. I believe that I am well equipped to follow this programme, as I am currently studying A-Level Mathematics and AS- Level Further Mathematics, taking modules in Pure Maths, Statistics, and Mechanics. They will see all this on your UCAS form, you are just wasting valuable space here. Plus, every other applicant will have at least A Level Maths, so it’s not necessary to mention. I consider the course to be suitable as the extra year gives me the opportunity to study the subject with a greater level of specialisation, This should only be in if the applicant is applying to all 4/5 year courses where they'd get a MMaths, if they have any 3/4 year ones it needs to go which is ideal if I wish to pursue a career as a professional mathematician. Should only be a capital when it’s a proper noun. Also, what is a professional mathematician? Be specific when mentioning careers, if they are mentioned at all. This hasn’t given any sort of feel for the sorts of interests the applicant has in mathematics, which is crucial to convince the admissions tutors that they want to do it and that they are good enough to get an offer. I consider that the versatility of a mathematics degree will allow me to widen the scope of future career paths instead of restricting me to a particular to one. I would reconsider your usage of the word "consider". You could even write this as "The versatility of a mathematics degree ...". Adding the part about "instead of" also feels slightly redundant. The Master of Mathematics choice also allows me to tailor the programme to suit my personal area of interest, which is pure mathematics Why this area over mechanics etc.? How can you show your interest in this area (extra reading, interesting problems etc.)?

This paragraph doesn’t really tell the admissions tutors anything that they won’t already know: that a maths degree is good for jobs, and that the masters course will give them more specialisation. The applicant should focus on WHY the LIKE maths and what parts in particular.

By attending a couple of the maths taster courses held on offer by the University of London Summer Schools programme, confirmed that I would like to pursue a career in the field of Mathematics; perhaps as a professional mathematician or as an accountant, as this is a field that I am particularly considering This sentence doesn’t make grammatical sense. Also, it’s still focusing on careers, so doesn’t really add anything. The applicant has gone from saying they want to be a professional mathematician (if such a thing even really exists, apart from in academia) to maybe an accountant.

The two taster courses I attended, ("Exploring Mathematics", a two day event held at Royal Holloway and "Women in Mathematics" held added a space here at UCL) not only allowed me to gain a greater sense of independence this isn't a word but also shows my commitment to the subject As it stands, this doesn’t add anything. What should be focused on is what they got out of the course: how did these courses develop the applicant’s knowledge of maths at uni? Why did it further their interest in maths generally and in studying it at degree level?

Outside of the entire maths field, this is awkward wording and the admissions tutors will know that obviously every applicant has a life outside of maths, with non-maths related interests! I have shown commitment by attending Chinese- Cantonese lessons on a weekly basis at a Chinese School in central London from the age of 4 and only recently stopped attending. That's just rather odd! also, did the candidate enjoy the course?? In a previous summer job at 'The Chinese Herbal Medicine and Acupuncture Centre' not only did I gain a greater understanding and insight into the herbal medicinal trade, but I also learnt the basics of conversational Mainland This is odd, mainland Chinese isn't a language, I assume they mean mandarin, as cantonese is also spoken on the mainland (plus loads of other variants!!) Chinese. Outside of the family, I have put by Cantonese lingual skills to practise on holidays to Hong Kong as well as at 'New World Noodle House' The applicant doesn’t really need to mention a noodle house! This is too long to talk about Chinese when the applicant is applying for maths. The varied nature of my previous paid employment has given me a wider view of the different vocations as well as sustained my self- sufficiency. I’m not sure that one job can give this wider view. Also, this is awkwardly worded. This summer, spent at a telemarketing company, 'Business Advantage', as well as being an active part of the sixth form council and 'Think Force', has made me more confident in expressing my opinions, and enhanced my listening skills

This is a rather nothing paragraph, again, the applicant could condense the previous two paragraphs into two sentences and still convey all of the main points.

During my time in the sixth form I have given some service back to the school. I was previously Prefect in Year 11 and was also a 'Big Sister' in the school's 'Big brother, Big Sister' scheme which enables the interaction between the upper and lower schools, as well as help the lower years settle into the school. I find this work rewarding, especially as it is entirely selfless Really? Hardly anything is entirely selfless.

The final paragraph is the last thing that an admissions tutor will read. The final statement this applicant has made comes across as saying something along the lines of "I am a selfless person", and although you are supposed to be positive about yourself, this can come across badly. Try instead to have your final sentence giving a strong case for accepting you on their course. A conclusion also shouldn’t bring in anything new about the applicant: it should sum up what has already been said.


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