• Personal Statement:Law 38

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Law Personal Statement

Firstly I would like to express my passion for the subject of Law. In May 2004 I gained work experience at Blackburn Magistrates Court, this opened my eyes to the English Legal System and from this; I was inspired to pursue a career in law.

Whilst studying for my law AS & pre-legal qualifications in college, I attended a “Behind Bars” conference in Manchester in which I gained a valuable experience into the way the legal system works. I also took on board the reactions from the audience in relation to sentencing and even some miscarriages of justice; I found that this opened different perspectives in my way of thinking about the English Legal System.

College gave me an invaluable opportunity to gain an insight into case studies of Contract Law, which I found to be rather interesting. The one case that will forever be in my mind is the “Donoghue v Stevenson” case, I recall being taught about this case and the fascination I experienced whilst having a debate on who’s lap the duty of care fell upon to, Because of this I still enjoy reading about such cases today.

Learning about the English Legal system at college made me even more determined to follow this type of career because I found it very interesting and it always gave me something to think about once I had left class.

At the moment I am currently studying towards gaining an Access to HE Diploma, including studying Psychology and Criminology at a Level 3 standard.

Studying Criminology gives me more of an understanding of crime, which I believe will help me in my chosen future and continue to help me build upon my knowledge of this subject and assist me in developing the qualities I feel I already have, which would make me very successful in this profession.

At High school I was given the honour of becoming a prefect in which I gained good time management skills and opportunities to help fellow pupils in their education. I enjoyed taking part in study groups and social activities such as music groups and reading classes.

Later in life, once I started college I became a proud member of the debate team.

I would class myself as an avid reader of a wide selection of books ranging from general fiction, through to educational books. In my spare time I enjoy the usual hobbies of socialising with friends and college class mates and given the opportunity I take delight partaking in an afternoon spent at my local Magistrates court. Doing this keeps my mind active over court situations and gives me the chance to see Solicitors and Magistrates in action.

Since leaving education I’ve been employed as a Customer Service Assistant which I believe has enhanced my people skills. I deal with a wide range of jobs, from dealing with complaints to basic customer service.

I’ve also been attending Night College in order to carry on my education studying Psychology and Criminology, which I believe shows my commitment to wanting to improve myself and get myself onto a Law Degree. I know I’ve worked very hard to get where I am now and would be more than grateful if I was granted the opportunity to further myself and get to the pace I feel I belong to be in life.

My goal within life is to achieve a high standard of degree in order to excel in my chosen career path, may this be solicitor or even if I am lucky enough, a barrister. I know I have the skills, Drive and passion to succeed I just need the opportunity.

I fully believe that my succeeding in this law degree will open so many doors for my future and eventually get me to where I deserve to be in life.

Comments

General Comments:

This PS falls into the unfortunately common category of focusing on ‘wanting to be a lawyer’ rather than ‘wanting to study a law degree’. A law degree is not vocational – there is further study required to qualify in the law profession, and the applicant needs to show an academic interest in the subject they are hoping to study for 3 years. This can be done through extra reading around a particular area of law that interests you, or (more riskily) work experience (risky because it can fall into the ‘being a lawyer’ category if not discussed properly). The PS doesn’t flow very well because there are too many paragraphs, and things are repeated in the paragraphs. Also, it is too informal in places.

Comments on the statement:

Firstly I would like to express my passion overused word in PSs for the subject of law. Should only be capital letters when naming a qualification. Also, it is unwise to start a PS with ‘firstly’ – especially as that is what you should be doing throughout the statement! In May 2004 I gained work experience at Blackburn Magistrates Court, it’s not important to name, just saying ‘at a magistrates court’ would be fine this opened my eyes phrasing is too informal to the English legal system and from this; shouldn’t be a semicolon I was inspired to pursue a career in law. This just makes me wonder why they went to the court if they didn’t have an interest in law in the first place. This doesn’t really explain why they are interested in law at all – the applicant should show an academic interest in law (or a particular area or areas), rather than the desire to be a lawyer. Law is not a vocational subject: further study is needed to qualify as a solicitor or barrister.

Whilst studying for my law AS & pre-legal qualifications in college, it doesn't overly matter when it was, also do not use ampersands (&) in a PS, as it doesn’t come out in UCAS formatting I attended a “Behind Bars” conference in Manchester in which this ‘in which’ is worded awkwardly I gained a valuable experience into the way the legal system works. So how was it valuable? What did you do? What did you learn about law? Why was it interesting? I also took on board phrasing too informal the reactions from the audience this doesn’t strike as the right word in this context in relation to sentencing and even some miscarriages of justice; I found that this opened different perspectives in my way of thinking about the English legal system. This paragraph is saying, in a very long winded way, how the applicant has been made aware of the degree of flexibility in the legal system upon attending a “Behind Bars” conference. It is always a good idea to say how you take an interest in law in your spare time as the applicant has tried to do here but the point must be made explicitly and expanded on.

College gave me an invaluable opportunity to gain an insight into case studies of contract law, which I found to be rather interesting. Why did you find it interesting? What was it about it? This needs expanding on. The one case that will forever be in my mind phrasing too informal is the “Donoghue v Stevenson” case, I recall being taught about this case and the fascination I experienced whilst having a debate on whose lap again, informal phrasing. This could be condensed by saying something like ‘The “Donoghue v Stevenson” case was particularly interesting…’ for example the duty of care fell upon to, Why did you enjoy this case in particular? Why is it memorable above all others? How did this make you want to study law? Remember this should be related to the background of law. Because of this I still enjoy reading about such cases today. This isn't a sentence. A number of applicants will have studied A Level Law, so the applicant needs to make this particularly person to them, by talking about their interests in it explicitly.

Learning about the English legal system at college made me even more determined to follow this type of career because I found it very interesting and it always gave me something to think about once I had left class. The applicant needs to focus on the theory/academic side of law, not the career of being a lawyer. At the moment, this sentence is serving little purpose. Also, one sentence does not equal one paragraph. At the moment I am currently studying towards gaining an Access to HE Diploma, including studying Psychology and Criminology at a Level 3 standard. They do not need to include this at all as all of their educational information is elsewhere in the application, it isn't needed here.

Studying criminology gives me more of an understanding of crime, well yes, this is evident, so can be removed which I believe the ‘I believe’ should be reworded will help me in my chosen future very odd phrasing, right now the applicant is simply applying for law, there is no guarantee they will get an offer or become a lawyer. The universities will chose their future, they can't assume anything and continue to help me build upon my knowledge of this subject and assist me in developing the qualities I feel I already have, which would make me very successful in this profession. Right, so what have you actually learnt in criminology that is applicable to law and how has this encouraged to you study law? (rather than criminology).

At high school I was given the honour of becoming This wording is unnecessary a prefect in which this wording is awkward I gained good time management skills and opportunities to Awkward wording with ‘gaining opportunities’, so this sentence needs rewording help fellow pupils in their education. I enjoyed taking part in study groups and social activities such as music groups and reading classes. Once again, chronology is becoming an issue. It’s fine to include events in another order other than chronological but it reads very badly to have them split up and moved around like the applicant has done here, for example, they talk about college again in the following paragraph after moving on from college in the previous paragraph and talking about high school. This paragraph tells us very little about the applicant other than that they are a prefect. They need to focus on transferable skills, such as good time management being essential for their degree. However, they should not dwell on this issue and stick to the academics. Most universities do not care that they have been a prefect because the vast majority of applicants have this paragraph in their PS, meaning it doesn't make the applicant stand out.

Later in life, once I started college I became a proud member of the debate team. A perfectly fine point to include in a law PS but not as it is here. This should be moved with the college section and also expanded upon. The applicant needs to say how well the debate team provides, and hones, skills that would prove invaluable to a law degree.

I would class myself as this wording is unnecessary an avid reader of a wide selection of books ranging from general fiction, through to educational books. Any relevant to law that could be discussed? In my spare time I enjoy the usual hobbies of socialising with friends and college class mates and given the opportunity This implies ‘I enjoy getting drunk’ etc. - universities do not need to know what you do with your friends I take delight partaking awkward wording in an afternoon spent at my local magistrates court. Doing this keeps my mind active over court situations and gives me the chance to see solicitors and magistrates in action. This experience needs to be linked back to how this affected the applicant’s decision to study Law. What have they done/seen etc. that has made them interested in law and why do they now want to study it at university?

Since leaving education I have don’t use contractions in a formal document like this been employed as a customer service assistant, which I believe has enhanced my people skills. I deal with a wide range of jobs, from dealing with complaints to basic customer service. The applicant needs to link this back to a law degree and how people skills are necessary for one.

I’ve also been attending night college in order to carry on my education studying psychology and criminology, which I believe shows my commitment to wanting to improve myself and get myself onto a law degree. The applicant has already mentioned this elsewhere and it will also be in the education section of the application I know I have worked very hard to get where I am now and would be more than grateful if I was granted the opportunity to further myself and get to the pace place I feel I belong to be in life. Again, all the information on psychology and criminology needs to be grouped together to help the PS flow well. The applicant also appears to be saying ‘I belong in a law profession, therefore that’s where I ought to be,’ which isn’t a good idea, as this is an academic degree. Instead, this sort of thing should be implied through discussing their interests in the PS.

My goal within life is to achieve a high standard of degree in order to excel in my chosen career path, may this be solicitor or even if I am lucky enough, a barrister. I know I have the skills, drive and passion to succeed I just need the opportunity. Again, there is too much focus on the wanting to be a lawyer. An applicant needs to show that they are aware of the work and dedication involved in a Law degree but it is also a good idea to show how they already have shown work and dedication and therefore will have the drive to succeed.

I fully believe that my succeeding in this law degree will open so many doors for my future and eventually get me to where I deserve to be in life. This last part is too clichéd and doesn’t focus on the degree itself, which it should. The conclusion should sum up why you want to study law and why you are a good candidate for it.


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