Sponsored feature, Words by Sheffield Hallam University


Mischelle interviewed the bands in the artists' area behind the main stageWith over 70 music venues, 65 recording studios and 465 bands, Sheffield stands firmly as one of the UK's leading music cities. It's a fundamental part of student life, with thousands of students taking advantage of the live gigs and DJ sets often held in pop-up venues from Victorian cinemas to abandoned warehouses.

But Sheffield is a place where the music scene also creates opportunities to build your skills, the chance to meet some amazing people and gain work experience to really brag about.

Tramlines Music Festival takes over the city every year with more than 100,000 people watching hundreds of bands in venues from parks to basements. The festival costs under £50 for three full days of music and the whole city gets involved, so there are lots of free events too.

Sheffield Hallam University's partnership with Tramlines means that its students can really immerse themselves in the experience.

Victoria Greensmith and her friends George and Mishelle worked behind the scenes at the 2015 event, interviewing the bands, filming and taking photos. Their work has been shown in between the acts on the screens at the main stage.

Greensmith, a film and media production student, said: "I'd taken photos at gigs before, but Tramlines was my first big festival, and I learnt so much. It's real hands-on experience and that can't be taught."

Tramlines taught me so much about how to be a photographer. I would never have had that experience if it wasn't for Sheffield Hallam."

A degree in photography, film production or journalism would provide excellent opportunities to work in the industry during the course, but it doesn’t matter what degree you choose. There are plenty of ways to get involved, whether it's part-time work in live venues, blogging or exploring the history of music in the city (where the likes of Arctic Monkeys, Human League and Pulp began their careers.)Victoria Greensmith

Peter Neild, activities officer at Hallam Students' Union, said: "There are so many ways to make the most out of Sheffield's music scene, whether you're planning a career in the music industry or not. There are plenty societies to get involved with too.

"We have a rock society - for students who enjoy alternative music. Everyone gets together to see gigs, play music and attend other music-related events around the year."

Sam Briggs, a Hallam creative writing graduate, said: "In my opinion, if you're into music and meeting new people, there really is no better place to be. Sheffield Hallam is a great place to study anyway, but you also have the added experience of working with some incredible bands and being a part of the live gig scene. All while adding voluntary or work experience to your CV."

And it's not just music, there are loads of festivals and other events to give you the opportunity to gain valuable experience from Doc/Fest, one of the top three documentary film festivals in Europe, to Sheffield Food Festival and Cliffhanger, a weekend of outdoor activity.

Find out more at shu.ac.uk/sheffield