Sponsored feature, words by Russ Thorne
Higher education isn't a 'one size fits all' deal. The university experience comes in many shapes and sizes, just like students do, and that variety certainly stretches to where you live while you study.
There's a lot to be said for moving away when you go to university, of course, but it's not the only option. Basing yourself at home has plenty of advantages, from time management to lifestyle.


There's a lot to be said for moving away when you go to university, of course, but it's not the only option. Basing yourself at home has plenty of advantages, from time management to lifestyle.

Here are five great reasons to keep your suitcase in the cupboard when you enter the halls of higher education.

You can save time and money

Going to uni is a weighty financial commitment, in terms of both fees and accommodation costs. But one of the great advantages of staying at home during your studies is that you (and your folks – if they're contributing) can forget about those additional accommodation costs.

You can also save on your living costs. Your parents might ask you to chip in for food and so on, but it will still be cheaper than handling all the individual costs on your lonesome. It might also make it easier to find time for extra study, adds Robert Goate, head of business school admissions for BPP Business School: "Having your parents available to cook, shop and do your laundry can be a major time saver."


You can take advantage of flexible working

Not being on campus needn't be a drag. Many universities, like BPP, have excellent online facilities that help you access extra resources wherever you are. You might also have rather better broadband and computing facilities at home compared to halls.

"All information for your course is available online," says Goate, explaining BPP University College’s offering. "Most of our lectures are recorded, and there are downloadable presentations, and core texts available online." You can use this flexibility to take care of coursework away from campus and free up time for attending lectures.


"You'll learn more about team building, leadership and people in lectures and workshops which will stand you in good stead for the work environment."Going to uni is a weighty financial commitment, in terms of both fees and accommodation costs. But one of the great advantages of staying at home during your studies is that you (and your folks – if they're contributing) can forget about those additional accommodation costs.


You'll be able to focus

Student life is packed with myriad distractions. Along with all the fun you’ll have, you’ll need to find time to deal with exam revision and killer deadlines. If you’re on an intensive course (such as one of BPP's accelerated two-year degree programmes) you need all the time you can get for study.

For anyone who wants to get their head down and get on (or for those who just want to dip into the hectic student world and then retreat to a nice calm oasis) staying at home might be just the ticket.

"Living at home can offer fewer distractions, particularly if you have trouble saying 'no' to invitations from your friends!" says Goate. "Accelerated programmes are intensive and require you to work through the summer, so living at home may be an advantage if it can help you to focus."

It gives you different study options

Some universities, such as BPP University College, have sites based in a number of different locations. That kind of geographical spread means they are closer to a wider range of potential students, making it possible for many students to commute into lectures.


So, deciding on staying home to study might make some excellent institutions available to you, and make your life easier in the process. "It can save you the trouble of looking for accommodation, and all the associated costs and complications," explains Goate, pointing out that BPP's regional centres offer the same excellent facilities as any of their larger sites.

You're still every inch a student

Being based at home doesn't make you any less a full-time student; it just makes you one with more regular access to a (working) washing machine. You'll have all the benefits of the student life, plus a place to get away from it all when you need it (and everyone does, from time to time).

"Because you’re managing the time you spend at university and at home, you’ll better appreciate the times you’re out with your friends or studying,” says Goate. “And you'll still benefit from the same experience as those students who live away from home."