AQA Geography A-Level Flashcards Hazards

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: 13boneo
  • Created on: 02-10-19 15:34
What defines a hazard?
An event that poses a threat to people, whether anthropogenic or natural; a hurricane on an uninhabited island is not a hazard
1 of 11
What constitutes a hazard?
A hazardous event must impact a vulnerable population, meaning they will be severely damaged by it, and over 100 lives will be lost. The Degg Model combines hazard with vulnerable pop to get natural disaster in the form of a Venn diagram.
2 of 11
What are the three types of geographical hazard?
Geophysical (caused by land processes such as tectonic movement), hydrological (caused by movement in bodies of water) and atmospherical (caused by atmospheric processes)
3 of 11
What factors affect how an individual perceives hazards?
Wealth, experience, mobility, religion, education
4 of 11
What is the difference between adaptation and mitigation?
Adaptation concerns learning to live with the hazard, whereas mitigation involves trying to lessen or altogether prevent a hazard
5 of 11
What makes fatalism a passive response to a hazard?
Fatalism suggests that hazards are ​uncontrollable natural events, and any losses should be ​accepted​ as there is nothing that can be done to stop them.
6 of 11
What is the active hazard response of risk sharing? Can you give an example?
​A form of ​community preparedness​, whereby the community ​shares the risk ​posed by a natural hazard and ​invests collectively to mitigate the impacts of ​future hazards​. CurrentlY in NZ, as 2010 Canterbury quake cost 20% of the GDP in damages
7 of 11
Why can low incident hazards (hazards that do not happen very frequently) be more catastrophic than high incidence events?
Low incidence hazards ​may be ​harder to predict ​and have less ​management strategies put in place, meaning the hazard could be more catastrophic when it does eventually occur. Also, low incidence hazards are usually more intense - only 36 above 8.5
8 of 11
Why are LICs likely to experience natural disasters?
Even if the hazard is identical, an area with a​lower level of development is less likely to have effective mitigation strategies as these are costly.
9 of 11
Why do some HICs still struggle to prepare for natural hazards? Can you give an example?
HICs can still be multi-hazard environments, meaning resources are spread thinly to cover a range of hazards. In ​Canada where ​wildfires have been increasing over the last few years (as a result of climate change), less ​money for quakes & namis
10 of 11
Describe plate tectonic theory.
The lithosphere is broken up into large slabs of rock called tectonic plates. These plates move due to the convection currentsin the asthenosphere, which push and pull the plates in different directions.
11 of 11

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What constitutes a hazard?

Back

A hazardous event must impact a vulnerable population, meaning they will be severely damaged by it, and over 100 lives will be lost. The Degg Model combines hazard with vulnerable pop to get natural disaster in the form of a Venn diagram.

Card 3

Front

What are the three types of geographical hazard?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What factors affect how an individual perceives hazards?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the difference between adaptation and mitigation?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Geography resources:

See all Geography resources »See all Natural hazards resources »