Biopsychology

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  • Created by: EmiLy1703
  • Created on: 22-08-17 15:04
What is the nervous system?
A network of nerve cells and fibres. Helps all parts of the body communicate with each other
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What is the central nervous system (CNS)?
It receives information from the senses and controls the body's responses
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What is the peripheral nervous system (PNS)?
The part of the nervous system that is outside of the brain and spinal cord
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What is the brain?
The part of the CNS responsible for coordinating sensation, intellectual and nervous activity
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What is the somatic nervous system?
It is responsible for carrying sensory and motor information to and from the CNS
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What is the spinal cord?
A bundle of enclosed nerve fibres which connects nearly all parts of the body with the brain
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What is the autonomic nervous system?
Governs the brain's voluntary activities (e.g. heartbeat, stress) and is self-regulating
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What is the parasympathetic nervous system?
Calms the body after an emergency state. Involved in energy conservation and digestion
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What is the sympathetic nervous system?
Involved in responses that help us deal with emergencies (fight or flight)
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What is the nucleus?
Contains DNA and controls the cell activities
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What is the cell body?
Holds the nucleus and other organelles of the cell
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What is the pituitary gland?
Senses the body's needs and sends signals to different organs and glands throughout the body to regulate their function and maintain an appropriate environment
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What is the thyroid gland?
Regulation of the body's metabolic rate as well as heart and digestive function, muscle control, brain development and bone maintenance
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What is the pancreas?
Makes digestive juices which consist of powerful enzymes which are released into the small bowel after meals to break down and digest food. It makes hormones that control blood glucose levels
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What are the ovaries?
Produce eggs for fertilisation and produce the reproductive hormones oestrogen and progesterone
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What are dendrites?
They receive signals from other neurons and send the signal to the cell
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What are the motor neurons? What do they do and what do they have?
Sends messages from the CNS to the PNS. Carry action potentials: away from the CNS, towards an effector. Have: short dendrites, long axon and large cell body
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What are the sensory neurons? What do they do and what do they have?
Sends messages from the PNS about the environment to the CNS. Carry action potentials:away from a sense organ or receptor in the PNS towards the CNS. Have: long dendrites, short axon and small cell body
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What are the relay neurons? What do they do and what do they have?
Sends messages quickly between sensory and motor neurons. Involved in reflexes. Carry action potentials: between neurons, within the CNS. Have: situated in spinal cord and brain, many axons/dendrites, non myelinated
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What is the axon?
It carries the nerve impulses from the cell to other neurons and muscles
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How do neurons work together?
Stimulus -> receptor -> sensory neuron -> relay neuron in CNS -> motor neuron -> effector -> response
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What is the hypothalamus?
Maintains homeostasis to keep the human body in a stable constant condition links nervous and endrocrine system together
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What is synaptic transmission?
The process by which nerve impulses are carried across the small gap, the synapse, between one neuron and another. The nerve impulse is an electrical signal which is carried by chemicals called neuro-transmitters
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What is the myelin sheath?
Wraps around the axon of some cells to cause the nerve impulse to move faster
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What is the node of Ranvier?
Gaps along the myelin sheath to help conduct electricity
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What are excitatory potentials?
Make it more likely for the neuron to fire and so, if a synapse is more likely to cause the post synaptic neuron to fire so, it is called an excitatory synapse
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What are inhibitory potentials?
Make it less likely to fire and, if the message is likely to be stopped at the post synaptic neuron, it is called an inhibitory synapse
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What is the adrenal gland?
The gland in the adrenal system that releases adrenaline
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What is the adrenal medulla?
The central part of the adrenal gland
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What are terminal buttons?
They are located on the end, sends the signal on to other neurons
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is the central nervous system (CNS)?

Back

It receives information from the senses and controls the body's responses

Card 3

Front

What is the peripheral nervous system (PNS)?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the brain?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the somatic nervous system?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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