Ibsen Critics A05

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  • Created by: Kiera
  • Created on: 12-05-19 14:52
German actress Hedwig Niemann-Raabe refused to act in the final scene of 'A Doll's House' on the grounds that...
..."I would never leave my children"
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Ibsen insisted that the play is not about the rights of women:
“I have never written a poem or a play to further a social purpose. I must decline the honour of being said to have worked for the Women’s Rights Movement.  I am not even very sure what Women’s Rights really are.”
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Nora declares that she is “First and foremost a human being” - Toril Moi says that...
... Ibsen is the greatest dramatist after Shakespeare, and one reason for his greatness is that he is interested in human beings.
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Ibsen (about women)
“A woman cannot be herself in modern society. It is an exclusively male society”
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Morahan
“I would compare it to Hamlet”: Morahan whose interpretation has been described as a career-changing breakthrough. (Both of the characters procrastinate the task they originally set out to accomplish.)
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New York Times theatre critic Ben Brantley called Mcteer’s version
“the single most compelling performance I have ever seen”
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Ibsen himself wrote in a note on his work in progress that women can’t be themselves in an...
...“exclusively male society, with laws made by men and with prosecutors and judges who assess feminine conduct from a masculine standpoint”
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According to Skram, the message that ‘A Doll’s House’ sends is...
...dangerous for society, even if it liberates Nora.
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Smith (2019) - In her clever reworking of 'A Doll's House', playwright Stef Smith seems to suggest...
...Nora's famous slamming of the door on a claustrophobic life was less a revolutionary act than an evolutionary step"
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Smith (2019) - Lacing her feminism with Marxism...
...Smith dresses her three Nora's like collectable wines in tones of claret.
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Smith (2019) - the three Nora's, each awaiting emancipation...
... 1) Nora in 1918 voting for the first time. 2) Nora in 1968 noting the arrival of the pill 3) Nora in 2018, the face of just-about-managing austerity.
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Lavery (2011) Production
Torvald is played with an interesting edge of ****** need
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Morahan's Nora in (2013)...
... She presents us with a Nora who exists from the start in a state of barely controlled hysteria
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McLaren (2013)
At one point, Nora grabs her face to hold a smile in place, only for her features to melt into misery beneath her fingers
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Neuenfels (1972)
The characters moved like puppets with invisible strings, turning to the audience to deliver lines evoking a sense of failure of communication.
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A.S. Byatt
"Even a working woman is ridiculed"
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

“I have never written a poem or a play to further a social purpose. I must decline the honour of being said to have worked for the Women’s Rights Movement.  I am not even very sure what Women’s Rights really are.”

Back

Ibsen insisted that the play is not about the rights of women:

Card 3

Front

... Ibsen is the greatest dramatist after Shakespeare, and one reason for his greatness is that he is interested in human beings.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

“A woman cannot be herself in modern society. It is an exclusively male society”

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

“I would compare it to Hamlet”: Morahan whose interpretation has been described as a career-changing breakthrough. (Both of the characters procrastinate the task they originally set out to accomplish.)

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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