Rugby: Any tips and advice for a winger? Watch

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Wilko1900
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Hello, I'm a 17 year old, 5' 2", 7 1/2 stone Winger and I'll be playing for my College team next week for the first time.
As such, I'd welcome any match, pre-match and post-match advice for a Winger and a Rugby player in general.

Also, does anyone have any training advice, particularly for speed?

Other than speed what should a winger work on in practice?

Communication wise what do you say if you need more defenders your side or if you want the ball your way?

Do you have to wear a gumshield? I hate wearing mine as it is uncomfortable and I can't talk.

Thanks in advance for all and any replies.
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doubledot
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I'd say really practice evasion tactics. You obviously need to run fast to avoid being tackled, but there will be moments where a good slip through defence or avoidance of a tackle is obviously necessary, like swerving or side-stepping. You can also work on running with an arm ready to defend against tackles, which helps any rugby player.

Also, practice your ball grip and handling. By the time the ball reaches you, it's likely that you'll be under immense pressure from opposition, so anything like catching and making wise throws is a must. Fielding kicks are also things you can work on to better your game.

But yeah: being good at running is essential and crucial for that position.
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Wilko1900
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(Original post by wherethebeaverlive)
awww your short! kind of cute really
Ha, I don't need reminding...
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nosignal456
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JESUS CHRIST YOU'RE TINY. you better be fast.

Clearly the evasion tactic is going to be the best.
Try and practice a side step when on the balls of your feet, going forward and keeping your weight balanced. Push off with one foot, then back with the other and maybe even one more time to really confuse them.

You won't have much space to run so just keep your eye up the field (and the ball when it comes) focusing on where the gaps are. Depending on how good your centres are you may have found yourself with an immense gap after a move.

As a winger myself i start on the outside of my man (since im not as pacy as some of the guys im up against). This makes them come back inside to a nice crunching tackle rather than beating me for pace. You should opt for standing on his inside shoulder or outside when marking him depending on where you want to push the player. (i would suggest stand about 2ft inside him so you can tackle him on the outside.

Good luck mate, its more about balls and technique than anything.
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WharfedaleTiger
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I've played the position myself quite a bit and the key things are:

Ball Skills: Make sure you can catch, handle and offload in contact. Generally you don't have a huge amount of space (especally if your centers are as slow as mine to get the ball accross) so being able to make the catch and offload in the tackle is vital. IT also means that your less likely to be turned over. Another key factor is your ability to play under the high ball-practice taking bombs, over the shoulder catches and never letting the ball bounce...

Evasion: You need a step off both feet. Raw pace is useful in a winger but being able to line up a man, step in, cut inside quickly and so forth are the best skills you can have. IMO the best thing to do is a one on one tackling drill (Halps your opponent as well) in a 2 meter grid or getting some poles 50cm apart and stepping between them.

Poisitioning: Being in the right place to take an overs or unders line and not being caught out by the fly-half when he's kicking is vital. Also work on your kick return with the rest of the back 3-you should open up the field and take the ball back with pace, preferable targeting the area from which the ball was kicked (Generally thats where the forwards are) or firectly across the pitch. Dummy switch moves, switches, loops etc. are all veryb useful moves.
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Ab1odun
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I've been playing inside centre and wing for 8 years. I'm 6'1 and 90kg, so I get through a lot of one-arm and faulty tackling. I love playing against smaller guys, because they're no faster than me and I can throw them around aha, my friend, the best pieces of advice I can give you are as follows:

1. always watch the ball when it's been kicked. you do not want to be the one to concede a scrum in your own 22 from one of their punts. If you catch it cleanly in your own 22 and they've kicked it, shout "MARK" as loud as you can to be awarded a free kick. If you've got a good boot on you, take it yourself, or if you're not so confident with punts, give it a tap and pass it to the fly half deep.

2. tell your outside centre/ other wing/ full-back when he's in the line to support you when you run, i.e. staying close to you and going into contact when you do. When you do go into contact, present the ball as far away from the tackle area as possible. twist your body from the torso and try to get it as far into your own half as possible, perhaps even a metre and a half.

3. in defence, mark your man on his outside leg. always be one step wider than your opposite number. stay on his outside when he runs at you. hit a thigh, hit a leg to get bigger lads off balance. 'scrag' or tug on them if they get past you, slowing them down so a bigger guy can make the hit.

4. keep calling team-mates out if you see that the attacking side have an overlap, i.e. more men on one side in attack than you have in defence. "DRIFT, DRIFT" "GET OUT" is what I scream.

I hope i've been helpful.
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Riderz
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Run like ****!

Erm... on a more serious note, then just enjoy yourself.

Stay on the outside of people and try and force them back inside.
Be prepared to shout at your inside numbers and pull them out.
Dont get too involved with rucks/mauls even if they are very close to your touchline. Let the forwards worry about that, but if your the first person to a breakdown then you'll have to go in.
Watch for kicks and stay deep, even when your line goes up in defence.
If your going to be tackled try and protect the ball and try and stay on your feet.

I take it this is your first time playing. Dont worry about any mistakes you'll make. If you miss a tackle its not the end of the world and nobody will be expecting a Jason Robinson-esq performance. Enjoy yourself and try and learn as the game goes along.

ALWAYS WEAR A GUMSHILD. The state of my teeth are testimony to that! Dental work is expensive, not very fun, and nowhere near as good as your own nashers.
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pwilky
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Are we talking about rugby league or rugby union here?
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Wilko1900
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(Original post by pwilky)
Are we talking about rugby league or rugby union here?
sorry, should have said. Rugby Union
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pwilky
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I have played both.

To be honest...in rugby union, particularly in wintry conditions, you probably won't be required to do that much on the wing. I would suggest, in defence just keep your eyes on your opposition number and always be prepared to drop back for kicks.

In attack, just make sure you back up any breaks and chase any kicks downfield, putting pressure on the full back.

Rugby League would be a completely different matter, however.

The ball is in play much more and there really is no hiding place, with the wingers required to do a lot more in attack and defence.

If you ever get the chance to play Rugby League, I recommend it...much more enjoyable than Union.
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thesmellofdesire
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Ignore the last about League! Stick to Union, a real man's game.

Firstly always wear your gumshield, yes its uncomfortable but it'll save your teeth.

The weather is always integral to the way that the game is played. If the pitch is wet and boggy you will most likely be playing a much more defensive role. It also depends on what side your playing. Most people are right handed and as a result are stronger passing off the left. So if your on the right expect that to be the side they come at you.

The call that ive used at most clubs ive played at to call people over is 'Numbers Left (or right)', if youve seen something that they haven't don't be afraid to scream it at your Outside Centre.

To get the ball over to you when you have space, decide on a term to use with the rest of the team. I have been taught variations of roads. 'Highway', 'Motorway'. But you should decide on one with the backs.

Its a great sport. Get stuck in. Don't be afraid to challenge for the ball if your first at the breakdown. Always position yourself correctly when tackled to help your team maintain possession. And don't feel that you have to stick to the sideline. If you see a gap or a space to make a line through then do it. And just enjoy it.

Hope this helps.
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dannyc1310
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hi
ive been playin rugby on the wing for club and school and now playin for college so i have been playin for 7 years one thing i have always had to work on and it is vital to becoming a good winger is defence always make sure you dont get beaten on the outside use the touchline to your advantage it helps to improve your defence because if you consistantly stop your opposition winger he will think twice when you run at him so to become a good winger and score trys first work on your defence hope this has hepled
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martin jol
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run through the legs of the other team :P
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Muhdak
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Work off your wing. By this I mean, when you have passed the ball, chase it. Always be available when the ball is being passed out the back line. This will be tiring but it will be worth it. Also when you kick, keep the foot you are balancing on firm in the ground. This will allow you to generate more power through the kick. I've been playing rugby for 7 years now and have played at provincial level for two years. All of this advice is from my coaches, who are the best in the country. Continuity is another factor to think about, look it up on youtube. Simple rugby will win you the game. Don't try anything fancy unless you are sure it's going to work! Also, don't leave any space for your opposing winger to work around you. Use the touch line as your other defender if you know what I mean. Confidence is key, have a look up if you have time and identify the space...the use it! Back yourself when you run, meaning ensure you have support. Also, put on a bit of weight! For speed training, use the athletics track, rugby will only slow you down. Find an athletics coach, tell them your situation and they'll create a programme for you! Best of luck in your rugby career and I wish you every success in the future!
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y gorau
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Just watch Shane Williams, a classic small winger.

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Kalyne Ponga
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to run really fast run or your toes look down for acceleration then face back up also u should mould your mouthguard to mould it u have to put it in boiling water for 2 mins then take out and put it in your mouth regurarly and vite it gets your jaw size so I can talk
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